Sir Gene Speaks

0018 Sir Gene Speaks

March 04, 2021 Sir Gene Season 1 Episode 18
Sir Gene Speaks
0018 Sir Gene Speaks
Chapters
0:14
Intro
0:44
giotmo.life
3:16
Space
23:45
TX Done with COVID
26:05
How Vaccines Work (4th grade level)
37:54
Fauci Flu
38:34
Wrap-up
Sir Gene Speaks
0018 Sir Gene Speaks
Mar 04, 2021 Season 1 Episode 18
Sir Gene

I recommend listening at 1.25X 

Sir Gene on Gitmo Life: https://youtu.be/y24jlZMueZo
Starship SN10: https://youtu.be/ODY6JWzS8WU 

Support the show (https://bit.ly/39tV7JY)


Move to the same Podcast Host I use!
Get some credit on Buzzsprout! $20 Amazon Gift Card

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

I recommend listening at 1.25X 

Sir Gene on Gitmo Life: https://youtu.be/y24jlZMueZo
Starship SN10: https://youtu.be/ODY6JWzS8WU 

Support the show (https://bit.ly/39tV7JY)


Move to the same Podcast Host I use!
Get some credit on Buzzsprout! $20 Amazon Gift Card

I am back out on a little vacation here. I know I didn't mention it on the last podcast, but it was a little impromptu. I actually didn't realize I was going to have a little vacation when I recorded the last podcast. It was a surprise to you guys. Anyway, I'm a little bit more re-energized getting back in the swing of things and right off the get go For those that haven't seen it. I was actually on Gitmo dot life's YouTube channel doing a live stream last night. I think we did a little shy of three hours and frankly, I was getting a little tired, which is why we stopped. We probably could have gotten a lot further, but anyone curious about what I look like when I'm talking, you can watch that. It's up, I'll have a link in the show notes as well. Let me be honest here. I think the first hour of the conversation was a little on the boring side, a little too much techie stuff going on. By the second hour we started getting into a little more politics, a little more interesting stuff, in my opinion. Just kinda also ended up talking quite a bit about the eighties. Living in New York while eighties and nineties, a little bit of music scene and reminiscing on some old tech. So it was interesting episode. I definitely would not call this an interview. I was needed the subject, nor the interviewer in this one. It was more of just a livestream conversation that, I might have just sitting around and having a drink or two. Chatting with some guys about whatever topics happened to come up. So check it out if you're interested. Certainly get on.life is growing. Once no agenda social closes up for new users, I think that's going to happen in to 10,000 users and it's pretty close. Then get mo.life will certainly be one of the. Potential spillover sites and for anyone not wanting to manage their own site, I think it's going to be a pretty good option to be on there as well. Let's see, what am I going to talk about today? How bout. Let's start off with something. Interesting. And then in fact, I think the theme of this episode I'm just gonna make a prediction, even though I haven't finished recording it obviously is. I want to be a little more upbeat. I feel like the last four or five episodes, there's been a lot of, very pessimistic, negative. We're going to hell in a hand, basket type conversation going on, and it's easy to have that. Because if you look at the media, including alternative media, by the way, I'm not talking about mainstream media, I'm talking about the media that I generally check. Most of the stories are negative, at least for people that are similar to me. So it's pretty easy to start following, going into a pattern of just constantly looking at all the net negative crap happening. Feeling either more depressed or more angry or both of those or just run down, even if you're not depressed or angry, you just feel like you have less energy. So this episode, I want to make a pivot and start. Being a little bit more upbeat. So to that end those of you that already know will know and people that don't will after this, I'm definitely a big space nerd. I've been following space stuff ever since the space shuttle space X. Absolutely. Re-energized my interest in space. I think I've watched every single launch that space X has done. Probably in the last four years. So anything before that was spotty, but over the last four years I've got a good friend that is also super into space. So anytime one of us remember something's happening, we always remind the other person that way. We never miss a launch. Most of the time I watch him live certainly last year with COVID. It was really easy to watch every single launch live because I wasn't doing anything. I wasn't working. So I always had time available to watch the lunches. Now I think it's going to get a little bit more rare for me to be able to watch it live. But even if I don't watch the launch live. I'm absolutely going to watch it on YouTube after, in the evening or something after it happened. Along with that, it's been fun watching space X construct Starship, which is the new gigantic rocket platform that they've been billing for the last couple of years. In fact their launch facility down in Boca Chica, which is a little bit outside of Brownsville, Texas. It's about five and a half hour drive for me. So it's not near, but it's also not like a crazy far distance, like five and a half hours is about the longest that I would want to drive in one day to go see something. I did drive down there a few months back, a few months back when SN. Eight I believe which is the first sort of fully built out version of the Starship was getting ready to launch. So I got there a few days, so they had a number of days. They were thinking it might happen. And I figured there's no way it's going to happen on the first two of those days. So I'll come down. I think it may be Sunday and Monday where the first two. So I figured, okay, I'll come down on Tuesday or maybe I'll come down on. Might've been Monday in the evening. Get a hotel room and then drive down and see what I can see when I'm down there. So did that discovered a couple of things. First of all, the area that the roads are closed near the launch facility is substantially bigger than I expected. We're talking like six, seven miles away from the launch site and the roads are just closed. There's not really a good place to just watch the rockets the way that you can watch them on YouTube because on YouTube, there are, there's a couple of channels. I think there's actually three of them that have cameras out and with really good zoom lenses and really good stabilization to watch every time they do a launch down there. So I ended up driving around and eventually ended up in South Padre, which is the Island right across from the launch facility. But it's still five miles away, maybe. So while you can see the outline of star ship standing there, you can't really see any details. It's like watching a a sporting event from the bleachers. You can definitely say, Hey, I was there. Live. And you can see what's happening. Like you can follow things, but while you see the players, you can't really see their faces. So if a player's got a mustache or night or, something unusual about them, it has a nose ring. You can't tell from watching that game from the bleachers, if that's the case. And that's how I felt. So first day, no launch, everything got delayed and I thought, okay, I'll just stay another day. That's right. So stay one more day, Wednesday drove out to South Padre at some lunch out there waiting. I'm basically white waiting. I'm either sitting in a Starbucks or a restaurant or in my car watching YouTube and watching the guys that have cameras that that have a much better zoomed in view than I do. Nothing happens third day. I'm like, all right, I'll spend the money to do one more night down here. So stayed over one more night. Now mind you, it's not like I'm missing work for us or something. Right. I don't have a whole lot going on that week. So I could be there for several days and with the big deal, but it was costing me money to be there. Obviously. Hotels are not free even though there's a lot of fewer people during COVID and third day. Same thing. Repeat no launch. And I'm like shit, I'm not going to spend like a week or more down here waiting for them to launch. I really want to see it live. But I also realize how far away I would be to watching it live as a little bit. Again, it's like being in the bleachers. It's a little anti-climatic. You can say you were there, but you actually see a lot less than people that have the fancy camera equipment running. So finally, after three days of no launch, I just said, screw it. I'm going home. So that evening I drove back home and of course Murphy's law. On the following day, I was able to watch the first launch or the first launch. That was almost totally successful other than the fact that one of the engines, I guess actually both of the engines had problems. So the landing the launch was good. The execution of the belly flop was good. Even the straightening of the rocket back out was pretty good, but that's where the engines lost power. And it landed really hard with a big fireball, but I didn't get to see it live. The fireball would have been kinda neat to see you live. I guess that would have been big enough to be able to see it from even the cross from the other Island. It was almost successful. I'd say it was about a 90 to 95% successful flight giving them what they were trying to test and given it's the first time they ever flew that ship. So a few weeks later, maybe a month later, I can't remember now. And finally the launch of S a nine happens pretty much the exact same thing that we saw with the first launch with Snam. Takes off perfectly. The engines get turned off, sequentially, just like they're supposed to. Does the flip, does the belly flop straight down? It's coming down. It's about ready to land. They flipped the engines back on it, straightens up. So it's coming down getting ready to land and it looked like one of the engines cuts off. So now it's Not quite in the rights it's in the right area, but it's facing clearly not straight up. It's like often angle a little bit. And with just one engine running, not going to happen. So that one pretty much belly flopped right into the concrete, big red ball, big explosion, fun to watch, unfortunately, so they really didn't come a whole lot closer. And then somebody tweeted a question to Musk and said, Hey if you have three engines on the thing, which you're using all three to a fly up why are you only turning on two of them? Because the last two flights, you had engine failures, why should turn all three of them on? And, you could take that as a little bit of a smart ass question because clearly they have their reasons, right? Musk replies because we're stupid. Yes. That is absolutely what we should have done. So ironically the response back from mosque, and this is one of the things I love about them is that the guy absolutely has no problems saying when he's wrong, he has no problem being self-deprecating. He's the kind of guy that you would actually enjoy having drinks with. And of course he lives here in Austin now. So one of these days I'll stop them down and have drinks with him. But. For this, for the next flight that just happened yesterday, they did that procedure. So once again, everything was perfectly fine. Flew up shut the engines off the way it's supposed to flipped over on its side, started doing a belly flop of that was perfectly controlled. Getting ready to flip back so that it's facing up words, all three engines kick on it does its maneuver and it's pointing straight up and everybody's holding their breath and thinking, Oh, this is going to be great. It's great. This thing is landing, hopefully, and it's coming down and there's. Now down to two engines. And then finally we only see one engine burning and as we later found out spoiler, it that's the way it's supposed to happen. So it's supposed to go on two engines until it gets through within, I don't know, 50, maybe 50 meters, maybe 20 meters of the ground. And then it turns one of those two off. So it's really just doing the final landing on a single engine by design. So it's doing that on one engine. But there's a lot of smoke, which is to be expected because you're near the ground. You're stirring up, Dustin there's, stuff around it in the air. But also there seems to be just a, a random flame burning either out of one of the other engines or off the side of one of the other engines that is clearly not flame. In the traditional rocket sense. It's not a super high speed exhaust that is actually pushing the rocket up. It's just like if you lit a rag on the fire and the rag was soaked in gasoline or kerosene or something, or in this case methane, and there was just burning this red color with black smoke coming out of it. And this was on the on the other side where the engines are. So yeah, theoretically the engine plates supposed to be pretty heat resistant. It's obviously dealing with much higher temperatures itself from the engines when they're running. So probably shouldn't be a big deal. So finally, the smoke clears and we see SN 10 Starship standing there. Leaning there. It is slightly leaning, like the tower of PISA that everybody probably has seen photos of. So it's center of mass is enough above itself so that it's not toppling, it is standing there, but it's not exactly standing straight up either. So either the landing mechanism didn't work correctly, which is very likely because they're temporary landing legs. They're not what they're going to end up using in the permanent design. They haven't, I don't think manufactured those. Maybe they haven't even designed those yet the long-term legs for this thing. It's leaning, it's landed, it accomplished the thing that the two priests, yes. Landings could not, which is actually touched down on the ground in a controlled fashion without toppling, without exploding. But there's still that red flame. There's still a fire that seems to be burning underneath and to the side of this thing. And there's the official video stream on YouTube. They have two cameras that are showing this. Then there's one of the channels. Everyday astronaut, he's got at least two other cameras from different angles shooting this thing, and you can see a fire from a slightly different angle. And then there's NASA space flight channel, which has another set of cameras. They have, I think probably the most expensive, or at least the best quality cameras set up. They've set their cameras up. This is interesting. Like I said, space, nerd stuff, also photos and photo nerd stuff. They've said their cameras up on the roof of one of the residents that's in Boca Chica. Now all the houses have to be empty. All the residents. Essentially after evacuate every time there's a test launch, right? But these guys have cameras that are remote controlled on the roof powered by solar panels. So even if the power gets cut off to the building, their cameras are still running and they're communicating over a cellular. Data connections. So again, if the power's off, if the the hard line, the internet to the house is turned off, they're still getting signals from those cameras. So they have a really nice, close up view of the fire-burning. So a minute goes by a couple of minutes, go by. And the reactions from people are congratulatory. Third time's a charm. They finally did it. In fact, the official broadcast for space X ends with the statement. I guess third time's the charm. Landed safely. And we've achieved our goal for this test. Everything is great. The flight probably took about three minutes going out, but another two or three minutes going down. So it under 10 minutes, all of a sudden done, probably about nine minutes for the flight. A couple of minutes go by after that most of the broadcasters are getting a lot more relaxed they're talking about let's see, what's going to happen with the next test launch. See what kind of functionality they're going to be testing. And all of a sudden this spacecraft that is landed and standing with little fire towards the bottom explodes the massive fireball of bright red. Pushing the spacecraft up by about its height. And I think the height, I'm trying to remember what the height of this. I'm sure I will get it wrong, but I want to say it's at least 50 meters. It might be taller than that. It's substantial. It's hard to really judge because it's also a very wide ship. I think it's how wide was it? It's. Nine meters wide. So maybe nine by 60, maybe something like that. Anyway, I'm not going to look it up. Let's just say I'm wrong. You guys can look it up on your own, but it's a large ship. It ends up the explosion causes the rocket to go up about its own height before crumpling, as obviously there's massive structural damage from the explosion. And then falling down sideways on the launch pad, effectively doing the exact same thing that the previous version of the rocket did. That's a nine, except of course it first landed. Then it went up technically for the second time. So technically the rocket went up twice, although one of them was planned and one of them was definitely unplanned before turning sideways and then crashing back down. It was quite sad. I have to say watching this live while it was happening. I had the same reaction as the commentators. I was very happy that they managed to land it. Even though it's standing a little crooked. I was curious about the fire burning. I don't think that's supposed to be happening, but it looks like they had it under control. They had some remote controlled water jets pointed at the fire. They were trying to put it out and then the explosion happened. And then we got to watch that. In slow motion. I think the everyday restaurant guys video channel had it running at a high speed video as well. So we could watch the slow motion of the explosion happening. So as a space, enthusiastic, who has spent way too much time building rockets on the computer with a program called Kerbel probably in the neighborhood of 2000 hours, maybe even more. Or let's just say, I'm not going to admit to any more than 2000, even though it probably is more than that, that I I have a very I've experienced a lot of failures in that simulator and watching it happen in real life. It's just gotta be that much worse when it's happening. Then the seeing your pride and joy blow up in a simulator. And especially after it's accomplished its mission. It's very sad, but watching the slow motion video, there's a couple of things that To me at least look like a potential cause. So I think it is highly likely that the reason for the explosion was a methane leak. The rockets use a liquid methane and liquid oxygen and they were venting oxygen very early on. When you mix those two gases, of course, that's when you get the the really. High speed high energy burning that the rocket engines need. And when the field mixes. Methane without a high concentration of oxygen burns much slower. It burns more like what you see in most movie explosions. When you see an explosion in the movie, regardless of what the explosion they supposed to represent you always have this sort of a slow motion or a slow moving. Expanding red fireball. That's what everybody just from watching movies and television assumes explosions are like the majority of explosions you can't see. All you see is the aftermath, which is a dust cloud because the explosion itself usually takes place in just a tiny fraction of a second. It is super fast, super loud, and nearly. Invisible to the human eye on aided. That's why they don't use real explosions and movies because they don't look impressive. The aftermath is going to be impressive. There's going to be a lot of damage and destruction, but the actual explosion doesn't have that giant red fireball that everybody's used to. This absolutely looked like a movie explosion. What does that mean? So again, in my amateur rocket enthusiast, hat on. To me, it looks like they got rid of the auction from the rocket, but there were still a substantial amount of leftover methane that was neither vented nor was the fire fully put out. And so eventually the fire that was the side either coming out of one of the engines or maybe it wasn't the engine, but it was right next to where the engines are in the rocket. That eventually it heated up the inner containment tank enough that the size of the hole for that methane increased. And there was a big rush of methane came out it mixed with the oxygen in the ambient air and created this massive explosion. And the reason for that, like I said, is because you can see. Now all explosions are fast, but when you're talking about an explosion that is just an ambient air type explosion you can actually see over the course of a second or two, the burning of all that methane happening. And that was certainly a lot of energy. It raised the rocket, up to its own height or the carcass of the rocket, I should say. But. Had this been a, an explosion that internally would have mixed the liquid action? It wouldn't have been liquid because liquid action doesn't really burn, but if it would've mixed oxygen and methane prior to the rocket right engine, like it would have just mixed inside the rocket itself, the chambers inside the fuel tanks that. That explosion, it would have been much faster because massive amounts of both methane and oxygen would have all combined at the same time. And it would have just pulverized the rocket. It would've turned that entire stainless steel rocket into shrapnel flying in every direction. And here instead you had the majority of the husk of the rocket intact with some bits that were clearly blown off. You could see that in the video, but a lot of it just went up and then fell back down sideways and totally collapsed because there's no more pressure inside forcing it to hold its shape. I'm very anxious and curious to see what their official findings are. I'll be looking for when they release what the root cause was. And also what they're going to do to prevent that from happening in the future. But this was this was definitely fun to watch. It's all part of the process having the rockets not survive is the expectation. And Elan always says that it's like, there's only a 60% chance this time around that he predicted the rocket would survive land safely. Now it didn't land. So it was in that 60 percentile, but then it's still managed to detonate. After the fact. All right. So now that everybody that doesn't give a shit about rockets has stopped listening to the podcasts. I guess now I can actually flip gears a little bit and get back into some political stuff. So I mentioned I was on the fingers program at get more of that life. That was interesting, fun time. We might do some more of that stuff in the future. What's been happening while I've been on vacation. I gotta say I purposefully had tuned out to to not really be engaged in the political scene during my little break, my little holiday here. So I'm going to be catching up on, on some stuff. And in fact, let me start by. Okay, so C pack. Yeah. So this was, this is why I figured it would be a good time to take a break because when I was leaving SeaPak was still happening. And I figured that'd be plenty of news from seatback that everybody else was reporting. So I don't need to worry about that good time to get away from the podcast for a little while. It looks like Texas two days ago, the governor of Texas announced AF so my guess is somewhat embarrassingly prompted by what happened in South Dakota, Texas, the governor of Texas being somebody who considers himself at least to be very Republican, not a centrist, but very much On the same vein as the hardline publicans. I think he felt like damn if they're having no negative impact for not having mass and getting people back to work, makes us look a little too liberal if we don't do that. So he made an announcement saying the lockdowns over businesses can operate at full capacity and the mask mandate is GaN. Immediately stirring up a hornet's nest of liberals going bah. How can you do that? How can you do that? We're not immune yet. We haven't had the COVID shots yet, which is funny because Fowchee himself talks about how getting a COVID shot does absolutely nothing. In terms of changing the recommendations. You go in wearing a mask to get a shot, you get a shot, you walk out wearing a mask. You're supposed to still be tested after you get shots. So you want to fly from Texas or I guess anywhere really, you want to fly in an airplane while you gotta get tested beforehand submit that your results. And if you're going to one of these super communist countries, then you're going to be tested when you arrive as well. But let's say you're just flying a United or something. So you're going to get tested to here. And then if you already got the shot, you've got your, let's say you got both of the vaccinations, right? The two shot deal. Guess what? You still have to get tested the shots don't do Jack shit for you. They are. I don't know, honestly I don't know what they do because that requires actual investigation into the science of it. But I can tell you what they don't do. And there is, they don't change the requirements after you've had the shots for any behavioral modifications that the current governments have decided to impose on citizens. So maybe let's take the optimistic approach, right? Maybe the shots do work to moderate people's symptoms. If they get COVID, that's a very weird thing by the way, because typically when you're when you're getting a vaccine, like for measles or mumps or something, or, for cowpox CAPOX, is that a thing? Is it just pox? I can't remember, but like the original reason vaccines were invented and were given out, was to prevent people. From getting diseases because the vaccine simulates the virus and back in the olden days back in Louis pesters time, they didn't have electron microscopes and genetic engineering. So what they did have was access to the actual viruses. So they would attenuate the virus. They would effectively damage it. By using heat or later radiation by using processes that would effectively rendered the virus damaged enough to not really cause the the disease, because it couldn't replicate because it was already damaged, but it was the attenuated virus damage virus that was when injected into. It could be a human could even be an animal that would be compatible as well to generate antibodies to that virus. So that the way the antibodies working, I'm trying to talk in a very layman's terms here. But essentially the antibodies. We'll map a foreign substance and say, okay this doesn't belong in the body normally. So it must be some sort of a foreign thing. And in order to make sure that this foreign object doesn't damage the body the immune system, essentially clumps around that clumps the white blood cells around that object. And part of that process that actually transmitting to the immune system in general, in the body, the the pattern for how how the virus outer shell proteins actually connect. So it, the best way to think of it is that if you take a piece of clay or Play-Doh or something, and then you. You stick it on an object? I don't care what the object is. Pick one, let's say a let's see, what has variants? Let's say, Oh, handprint. That's a good one. Right? So you take a large piece of clay. You stick your hand into the claim. And then you pulling your hand out and now that clay has the pattern of your hand and that's essentially what or it's not exactly what your body's doing. Obviously this is I'm using a, an allegory frequent your body's doing or an analogy for what your body's doing essentially is map that. And so the next time that a similar substance gets picked up anywhere in your body and your bloodstream That pattern, if it already has existed from a previous infection will trigger the appropriate immune response extremely quickly. So immunity isn't really that you can't get infected immunity is essentially that you have a super fast response to any kind of a previously. Seen virus. And so when when we started having vaccines, it was a way to get the body to create that immune response. And to memorize it for the future. So it could very quickly fight those viruses if they ever came back without the first initial full blown infection by the virus where the body is I dunno, what's going on here, but there's something attacking me. So I'm going to just try stuff. First thing, let's crank the temperature up to 105, see if heat will kill it. And if that doesn't, we'll try something else. Man, I could just hear the voices of medical professionals and and neuroscientists yelling at me right now for. For using the wrong analogies, but it's close enough. It's close enough for this conversation. If I can talk about rockets using a simulator software, I can sure as hell talk about this using Play-Doh using the way viruses and human immune response works. They get on this whole track of conversation. What we're seeing right now is unusual because typically these the. The vaccines, they work by getting your body to be able to have a very fast immune response, thereby allowing you to not be infected by a particular virus. And that's even true of viruses that mutate like crazy, like, the flu virus, you, that it's constantly mutating. That's one of the characteristics of that group of viruses is that. They have a high mutation rate, which is why if you get. Inoculated against the flu in in the fall, you may still get the flu in the spring because a different strain, a modified version of the flu is the, in the spring. In fact, you might still get flu in the fall too, because there are more variants of it concurrently happening. Then the number that are in the vaccines for the flute that are typically, I think there's usually three of them, three or four that are in that shot. But there's more varieties out there. They just put the most common ones in. So with this, with these shots, like the Madonna one and I'm, I gotta assume the Russian ones the same way the split Nick shot. I'm not sure about the Johnson. I think that one's a little different in the way it works, but. But what we're hearing from from Dr. Death himself from Fowchee is that even if you get the shots and you absolutely should, according to him you get both shots. In fact, you get the full regiment that it provides no real protection against getting a viral infection. So what the hell are these shots doing? Because they're certainly not doing what typically. Vaccines have done. So they're still being called vaccines. And I know some people are they're MRNs, so they're totally different. I agree. They are different. Theoretically speaking or scientifically speaking, there's nothing wrong with an Mr. And a type vaccine. If you're artificially creating the outer layer of what the virus has, and then the inside is totally empty. Like it's not alive, there's no viral data in there. You're just basically replicating the outer shell of the virus. That is theoretically possible. And that theoretically should work in the exact same way that the historic traditional vaccines have worked as well, because the way that your body responds is by mapping the outside of the shell of the virus, it dizzy your body. Doesn't really give a shit what's inside the, like the actual viral load in there. It's just mapping the. Exterior surface of the virus, because that's the thing that it can interact with immediately and be able to use that, to prevent the infection by clumping around it. And essentially isolating and keeping it from. Interacting with other proteins in your body that it's actually trying to connect to. So it's just like, putting, if you think of the virus as being these analogies are horrible as being like wrapped completely in Velcro. And the virus has all of the one type of Velcro on it. And your cells that it's targeting have the opposite type of Velcro. So the one the virus let's say has the hooks and then your cells have the loops on them for the traditional type Velcro. I know there's other Velcros that are just use sort of mushroom looking pins that all interconnect with each other. Yes, those are better. But so if you have the Velcro type connection between the virus and the cell that it's targeting, that it's going to try and attack. What your immune system does is essentially dump a bunch of goo around those hooks that are the, on the Velcro on the virus to fill in all the spaces around the hooks and then gelatinize. So that even though. There's a Velcro on the virus and there's Velcro on your cells when they come together. There's too much other goop between them, for the virus to stick to your cell. And therefore the viral load does not get released. So that's the fourth grade level description of the way these viruses work. And I, I still, I've done a lot of reading guys. I've still not figured out exactly how the new proteins managed to or the new protein. Sorry. The new vaccines managed to. Stimulate your body to be able to react in that way, because everything that's coming out of Fowchee is to the contrary of the way vaccines work into the country of the end result. So it's I don't know if we got a, an actual vaccine that w that was a broken version of the virus. So that your body could map what the outside of that virus is, and then have a traditional immune response. I think a lot of people would be a lot more on the, Hey, let's go get a vaccine bandwagon than is currently the case. There's just too much black magic and shadows and candle lights and weirdness going on that they've. They've taken a lot of the trust factor away from these vaccines, because there's not been a good description of exactly how they're different from other vaccines, how they interact inside your body. And why is it that the end result of these vaccines is so vastly different than most other vaccines? So a lot of questions to answer. One thing I also mentioned to Adam, so if you heard it in no agendas last episode then you get bonus points because it came from me is I thought, Fowchee really deserves to have an honor at this point for being at the forefront of this COVID outbreak both from a. Hogging the news standpoint and from potentially we'll probably find out some years down the road, what part he played in the lab in move-on that actually created this. Why don't we just start calling this the Fowchee flu? Because the Fowchee flu, I think is a better descriptive term for what we're experiencing right now. This virus is acting very much like a flu. And the rate of mortality morbidity on it is also like a flu. There have been flus at some points over the years that have been much harsher than other years. This is by no means anywhere near the the reality of the Spanish flu. So let's just immortalized, Fowchee. And start referring to this as the Fowchee flu which is what it is. And it also should appease all the all the woke mob out there because we're not calling it the the flu or the China flu or, anything relating to blaming China, because for some reason, the woke mob seems to be super pro China these days, china's just doing everything right in the way they treat humans in their own country, the way they treat their own citizens. So they're clearly a model, but but if we just call it the the Fowchee flu, I think we get around all that. And Fowchee out, be happy. Cause when he's dead, we'll still have the Fowchee flu and we'll be able to remember this man forever. And he will be forever tied to the outbreak that happened in the last few years of his own lifetime. So anyway, I'm back, I'll have more traditional standard type, like going over a bunch of different articles. News stuff moving forward. I'll probably also do a few more interviews. I've been enjoying doing that. And hopefully you guys enjoyed this episode, even though this is a day delayed beyond what I was expecting and also covers a few. It covers only two topics, really. So definitely fewer topics than normal, but these are topics that I'm excited about. So hopefully you guys are as well. Thanks for listening.

Intro
TX Done with COVID
How Vaccines Work (4th grade level)
Fauci Flu
Wrap-up