Sir Gene Speaks

0011 Sir Gene Speaks

February 15, 2021 Gene Naftulyev Season 1 Episode 11
Sir Gene Speaks
0011 Sir Gene Speaks
Chapters
0:16
My Intro to Eric Hunley
8:10
Eric Hunley Speaks
10:01
Back to me
21:54
You are the product
31:34
What can we do to prevent this?
36:25
What you need to know as creator
Sir Gene Speaks
0011 Sir Gene Speaks
Feb 15, 2021 Season 1 Episode 11
Gene Naftulyev

Link to Eric's interview with Alison https://youtu.be/5G-07FtLJVo
Link to Eric's episode which was shut down in the middle of stream https://rumble.com/vdu45v-youtube-channel-shut-down-for-this-interview.html
Link to Eric's Locals https://unstructured.locals.com/

Support the show (https://bit.ly/39tV7JY)


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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Link to Eric's interview with Alison https://youtu.be/5G-07FtLJVo
Link to Eric's episode which was shut down in the middle of stream https://rumble.com/vdu45v-youtube-channel-shut-down-for-this-interview.html
Link to Eric's Locals https://unstructured.locals.com/

Support the show (https://bit.ly/39tV7JY)


Move to the same Podcast Host I use!
Get some credit on Buzzsprout! $20 Amazon Gift Card

Today. I want to start off by talking about something that actually happened while I was watching a YouTube stream which was pretty bizarre. I can't say that it's the first time something like this happened, but it's a very rare occurrence and this ended up having some strange follow-ups as well. So what am I talking about? So I was watching a YouTube video that Eric Conley did. Earlier today and he had a a crypto guy that he was interviewing in that video. And I jumped in, I don't know, 10, 15 minutes after it started. I had a little bit of time and to kill. So I figured I'd watch live instead of watching a replay. And as I'm watching this video all of a sudden the video just. Stopped. And I thought, Oh, it must be a buffering issue. So I refresh the page and instead of starting up again, it said this video has been deleted for content violation or whatever, the official languages for YouTube. That's bizarre. I certainly didn't hear anything that would have been even PG rated. They're talking about crypto stuff. And maybe it was something that happened before I started listing, so I thought, Oh, it's very strange. I'll wait a little bit, see if maybe they'll restart the stream or something. And don't know. Maybe watch another video. Somebody else did maybe a raccoon video. I love watching raccoons. They're awesome. And then I reloaded Eric's channel cause I thought let's see if they have a new video that they started because there was a break in the old one or something. And the message came up saying this channel is no longer here. It's been deleted due to content violations. And so what the hell? This is the strangest thing that's happening here? I've watched a lot of videos in the Erik's channel. All his videos are live interviews. They're not edited. All the interviews are using family-friendly language. It's not even adult language. There's really nothing that I've ever seen on this channel that is controversial me sad. Some politicians and the reason I liked his channel, the reason I found that initially is he was interviewing people that I have, I already subscribed to like Viva fry, Robert barns. Alison Morrow. He's had some very interesting guests on, and then some other folks that I've only occasionally seen, but I don't subscribe to. Who make up a a human lie detector type group where they analyze people's movements for clues on their reactions to, to answering questions. So that it's another fun set of folks. And then a couple of videos that he's had on with yeah. Former CIA agents. So there's been a variety of. What I would describe as really, these are the same exact things that you would find on NPR on their interiors shows guests who work in interesting fields who have interesting opinions, but literally nothing controversial. It's all very above board kind of stuff. And while some of the people certainly like Robert barns are clearly on the right side of the spectrum and a few other folks are as well, but there's also plenty of people that are on the left side. So I was very surprised when I saw that his video was deleted and even more surprised that his entire channel was deleted. That seemed crazy given what I've seen at least. So I reached out to him and and I, first, actually, before I even knew his channel was deleted, I notified him, Hey, I think your stream died. And and then finally I got a reply back from him, hours and hours later and said, okay, Yeah. And unfortunately not, it wasn't just the stream. It was my entire channel. I'm still trying to figure things out. So I thought, wow, that's nuts. So I actually found that he was on Alison's live stream earlier today and he talked for about an hour with her about the events that happened. And apparently he had no clue what was going on, just like the rest of us. At almost exactly the same time that the channel went offline, or I guess the stream went offline first and. Like 10 seconds later, the channel went offline. And when he looked through his emails, he had a series of two or three emails from YouTube first saying, Hey, you're violating our terms of service. Hey, we're going to suspend your channel and Hey, you've ignored what we told you. And now we're going to remove your whole channel. And they all showed up basically exact same time, less than a minute apart. So that was strange, feels like a very automated type system. Clearly not a human being, doing this. So he started reaching out to YouTube and about a half hour later, he got a response saying we've reviewed your channel. And we think that the it was the right call to get again, I don't know the exact verbiage, but essentially, no, we're not going to bring you back. We're going to leave. It turned off. You've been de platformed. So then he started getting on Twitter and obviously getting mad at this point. No, one's told them why. This just happened. It's not obvious they weren't doing anything that could immediately be seen as like, Oh here you go. This is what you did. And this is probably why they shut you down. Now I have a little bit of a theory on that I'll get into later, but as far as he's concerned, no idea what it might be. Once Viva and barns and Alison and a few other folks started picking up cars, tweets and retreating them got some more people involved in that. So then YouTube PR arm noticed anytime somebody's bitching loudly is when they get involved. So they, they said, okay we'll go ahead and review the issue here. Thanks for bringing through our attention. We'll get back to you when we know what happened. And that was the last thing he heard. So he still doesn't know what happened. And it's pretty much been a full day since they took his channel down. Now, Eric is not a huge mega YouTuber. He was a podcast or for a long time, he started doing video interviews. And right now he was out I think, a little over 15,000 people. Certainly not a start-up channel but not a mega huge YouTuber, either. Not like a Tim Poole or somebody with 4 million viewers. He's really a minor player as far as YouTube is concerned, but he's he was using YouTube as a something he could do his show on, but also generate supplemental income. So he does have a local channel. So somebody comes from that, but also he was doing. YouTube memberships, which is something that YouTube started a lot of live content people are using. So essentially you not only subscribe to a channel and then remind you that something is on, but you're actually paying like a monthly fee to be a member of that channel. And then YouTube does a split with the creator for that money. Which I think is super handy from a YouTube. Viewing perspective. It's not a great deal for the creators, but it's probably better than nothing, right? For it may convert more people than telling them to go to Patrion would, but essentially it's YouTube built on Patriot. So obviously as soon as that channel got deleted, he said he got some emails from people he knows that were essentially his supporters through YouTube. And saying, Hey, we've turned off your payments to this channels that it no longer exists. So effectively they've killed this channel, but they've also severed all the relationships that he had with people that are sending him money through automated transactions can like no agenda does as well. It's like a one, two punch against the guy. Anyway, I thought it would be good just for you guys to hear in his own words, what exactly happened? I didn't invite him to get on, but it's late already. And he's had a long, stressful day. So I said like, if you have the energy to do it, if you don't bother. And so I've just grabbed the clip that he recorded. That talks about the situation. This is not him talking to me. This is him talking to you guys to everybody, it was on his website and it was just a short little explanation of what the hell all happened. Take a listen. All right. Well, that was Eric in his own words. So you can see, he is quite confused and very distraught at what happened here. Obviously I'm going to have a link to waste, which Eric, he does have an account on locals, which I'm not a fan of. I think local says a lot of problems, not the least of which is that they're hosted on Amazon and could get turned off at any point by Amazon. If something high profile happens we've obviously seen that happen with Amazon taking down parlor. Locals could happen just as quickly and just as easily. So I'm certainly letting people know to use things other than locals and preferably federated systems, not closed systems, but either way he's on there, I'll have a link to 'em. His alternative sources like the non YouTube tubes out there that also have his videos. I re posted a link in no agenda chat for the video. Copy that he uploaded that went right up to the point where he was taken off YouTube. And you can see the sort of surprise look on his face and his guest at w who at first started just sort of joking about it and then realized that it's more serious than simply the stream going down. It's the whole channel going down and being deleted as well. He's a great guy. Certainly if you want to donate through one of his. Payment options like locals. I'm sure he would appreciate it. He's going to, at the very least have a drop in income, even if YouTube restorative channel. Now the only silver lining on this I'm hoping is that Eric gets a lot more popular and wherever he ends up going, he's going to have a lot more than 15,000 subscribers because frankly, the quality of his videos, the quality of his interviewing is on par or better than guys like Joe Rogan. And Tim pool. So I think he's, a little older he's certainly has a slightly different style. And he does the, remind me a little bit of the old Joe Rogan back when Joe didn't smoke so much weed. So Eric does have more of a calm down to earth and not high type demeanor while he's doing his interviews. So to that end, I wanted to bring this up first and foremost. And make sure you guys check out Eric and wherever he ends up and whatever links I can, I will provide. And also to use this as a cautionary tale for anybody else that is thinking of building their their media on somebody else's platform. This has happened so many times now that it feels like. Everybody ought to know better that being on somebody else's platform is no guarantee that you will be able to sit there indefinitely. And it could be that you taking down for politics. It could be just as easily that you're taking down, because you're just not able to generate the type of revenue that they need you to generate. If the videos that you are producing. Aren't all that great. They're not going to be running as many ads and this sort of happened in YouTube to smaller YouTubers. Probably two years ago now, maybe 18 months ago, something like that. Essentially, a lot of people, myself included that were under a thousand subscribers. I think I was at about 800, 860 or something like that that they just sent out a letter saying we're going to, we're going to take everybody. That's been in the YouTube. Partner program, which is the program where you qualify for advertising and remove you from that program because you no longer meet the minimum requirements that we're looking for. I don't blame YouTube for doing this because obviously there are a lot small or there's a lot more. Smaller channels than larger ones. And if they focus on just the larger ones, they're not really losing a whole lot by ignoring the smaller ones. And I personally didn't really care because I always had advertising turned off. I I didn't think that it would be worthwhile to interrupt my videos with ads at all. If I can avoid it for my Watchers, for my viewers. That was really not an issue. I also had kind of stopped trying to create YouTube videos by that point. It kind of went its course and I realized it was way too much work for what it was doing for me. Like the work was way higher than the the benefits and enjoyment that I was getting out of it. Not any kind of issue for me, but certainly I think for some people that were just trying to build their channels and hadn't quite gotten to that level. It was a bit of a shock. Now YouTube could do the same thing with 10,000 viewers with a hundred thousand viewers. Nothing says that they have to share any revenue with you at all. If you don't meet whatever criteria is, they put together, another thing they're doing, which is known, but it's kind of an, it's a little bit of an asshole move on. Their part, I think is just because you're not in the program, just because they're not going to do revenue sharing with you. Doesn't mean they're not going to put ads in so effectively what they're saying now is if you're a smaller channel or for whatever reason that we've determined that we're not going to do ad sharing revenue sharing with you. It doesn't mean that you're not going to have that you're now going to have ad free viewing for people watching your stream or your a prerecorded stuff. It could very much have advertising on it. It's just that YouTube is going to keep 100% of the money from that advertising. Yeah, I know a little bit on the asshole side there now. A lot of people I'm sure have heard the term demonetizing, lot of YouTubers complain about having to resubmit videos, get them monetized. This is sort of what they're talking about. What I just mentioned is that YouTube can either take your whole channel and the monetize. It essentially say you don't qualify to make any money off of video advertising. Or they can do it individually. So they think your channel is sufficient enough to be in the partner program and they're willing to split revenue through, but they're going to make a determination on the video by video basis on whether or not they're going to be doing that. Add sharing. And so I know the Fry's talked about it on a lot of his videos where he has to constantly resubmit videos and explain why they qualify for advertising, because a lot of them just sort of automagically end up getting kicked out of the advertising program. So that demobilization is something annoying and certainly reducing the amount of of money that YouTube can provide. And YouTube is general is way down. So a million subscriber channel that would have been doing. About $280,000 a year. Yeah. And revenue split from YouTube let's say four or five years ago, let's say four years ago. About a year ago, that same number of people consuming the same types of videos. They would be down to about 130,000. And as of right now, they would be closer to about 80,000. So YouTube has drastically also reduced the. The advertising, earning potential that people have as well as being more finicky about which of their videos are going to be mine. And again, all of this is completely understandable because for a while there, everything was really in the opposite direction where. YouTube was monetizing putting ads like for, big name products in videos that clearly were adult rated or had content that was trying to pitch something that was shady or they were just, they were videos in a very weird nichey. Some videos about people that raise foxes. Now it might be neat, but that kind of video isn't going to have a huge following other than people that enjoy watching faxes. And so YouTube, a number of times has redone their marketing program for advertisers in order to. Make advertisers happy because advertisers want their ads to be on the most relevant channels with the right demographics, meaning covering the right topics. And this is why things like on boxing videos, review videos. And animal videos do so well on YouTube. People are making a fortune off of animal videos. Why? Because they're completely non-controversial unless you do something stupid with the animal, obviously, but as long as the animals happy and you're not doing anything mean to it, those videos are prime candidates for advertising. Videos that are interviews, whether it's Joe Rogan type thing or what Eric was doing, those are worse than animal videos because there's at least some potential for controversy on these things. Not a huge amount, but maybe some. And then you get into the political video category, and this is where like Tim pool and Guys like Steven Crowder, who is back to making YouTube videos. This is where they live. So they're 100% of their content is politically related. And it's a lot harder for Amazon to sell advertising on a political channel. Yeah. Because right now, most advertising money. Is controlled by people that don't want to advertise on, not just saying anything controversial, but also not on anything that's at all right of center. And it's not even that these companies don't want to advertise it's that the people in that are controlling the ad budgets, those folks working in those companies. Are left of center and they don't want to spend any company money with anybody who's right of center. Now there are exceptions, there are certainly a company heads like the head of Nike or the head of Amazon as two good examples of company heads that I've been on record with their very left political views. But for the most part, I think. Generally companies are ambiguous as to any particular political direction. That's why a lot of companies have historically donated money to both parties, which you think about it doesn't make any sense why you donate money to both sides. You're just spending money against yourself. But they're not really spending money on a particular ideology. They're spending money on a particular person. Somebody in Congress, regardless of their political stance who has received money from this company will think of this company when they make laws and treat them nicely. So companies really are donating money to buy favors. And this has been happening forever. This is nothing new, but what's going on right now is. It's becoming less middle of the road, less inclusive and more pick your side and stick to it. When you have companies like Disney firing Gina Carano, who was going to be starring in a new spinoff series before her tweets came out, firing her, giving that up, like they're giving money up just like she is, or they're forcing her to give up money by no longer being in the project. But they're also losing money because either they're going to drop the project or they're going to recast it. And the fans are not going to have it at all. The fans don't want to watch it as a recast project. There's already a huge backlash against Disney's or a felt it there's been articles about it, about how Disney didn't expect this much of a backlash when they fired a coronal and luckily Kronos. Today already in a good place and has a new project in the works. Obviously nothing's started yet, but at least she has a path in the future with Ben Shapiro's company and she's going to keep going down that direction. So anyway, my point getting back to YouTube was that YouTube is in the middle. They're the middleman between the advertising money. And the content creators create content, which is then used by YouTube to pull in eyeballs. And that's where the rest of us come in, where they actual product. The advertisers are sort of like the feed for the product, which is us. So we, as the viewers consume the creators content, creators stuff. And by consuming that stuff, we become the thing that Google through YouTube is actually selling to advertisers and that's the eyeballs. So when a lot of people start watching a channel that has puppy dogs on it, YouTube can make a lot of money by selling those eyeballs. Two advertisers within them, want to put their ads and show us in the middle of that cute puppy video. Oh, here's this cool shampoo you should buy. It's a, it's really nice for people just like you. And sometimes they make huge mistakes. Of course. We've we all remember the Pepsi campaign. About a can of Pepsi essentially stopping and protest that didn't go over too well. So there are plenty of mistakes that happened that this most recent thing, of course, with the Superbowl ad that Jeep did that completely backfired because it was a woke ad. And as it turned out and I, again, I'm spacing out the guy's name the born in the USA guy Springsteen, that it turns that he had a DWI shortly prior to this ad being done. So you've got a guy who is convicted of driving drunk, selling a car. In the walkway. That's like a lose lose proposition for advertisers and Jeep. As soon as they realized this, they pulled the ad. They're like, Nope, we dumped a bunch of money into it. Somebody is probably going to get fired, but we're not going to, we're not going to keep running these ads. It's going to only hurt us, not help us. So this is what YouTube has to deal with as well. It's not just on television, so I'm not trying to say YouTube are the good guys here. They're acting absolutely like assholes. But I understand the motivation for acting the way that they are now earlier. I said, I would come back to why I think Eric stream ended up getting pulled. The title of the video that was on the live stream was. Blah, blah, blah, whoever the guy's name was and the name of the company, and then a giveaway of cryptocurrency. And I think that's the straw that broke the camel's back. Now. I don't think there's a whole lot that Eric did in the past. That was at all controversial. But my suspicion is, and we won't know until Eric publishes a video explaining what he finds out. But my suspicion is that their reason for pulling the plug on his video in the first place was that they're seeing this as essentially a pitch for some new cryptocurrency thing that a pumping dump or a pyramid scheme. And I think they're on super high radar given what's been happening. With with the whole Robin hood situation where you have a bunch of people on Reddit, just teaming up to buy stocks together and effectively. Make a bigger impact that hedge funds can even make. And so I think YouTube had some meetings over the last few weeks saying we can't be in the middle of this type of thing happening on our platform. So watch out for any kind of pump and dumps, watch out for anybody giving anything remotely related. To financial advice, if they're not like a legitimate certified financial person obviously they're not going to shut down Kramer's channel. But they will keep a stronger view on anybody promoting any kind of financial products and. I missed the beginning, the first like 10, 15 minutes of the stream. So I don't know how the introduction went, but I suspect that the word crypto was used a lot new company and even the bits that I did watch, and the fact that I actually. And the title of the video mentioned that they're going to have a giveaway. They're going to do it like a raffle. I think the combination of all those things is what triggered the automated AI process to shut down the stream. Now why after the stream was shut down and the warning was sent, why immediately there's no way a human could have reviewed it immediately. After the warning, the suspension came and after the suspension, the termination of the account came that I have no idea. All those things just happen. Boom boom one, right after the other. But I do kind of think that the reason the channel was shut down was directly related to the topic and the title and the conversation they were having. Because what we do know is that YouTube. Absolutely does text to speech conversion on live streams and does live monitoring by use of AI to determine whether that stream should be kept running or shut down. If you start saying some key words, you start saying Nazi, they will shut the stream down. You start saying COVID 19 elections scam. They will shut the stream down. Any, they have a list effectively of banned words that they're going to be monitoring through texts, to speech conversion, to shut down any kind of live stream. Now, if you upload the video, they will just tell you once the video is converted, this video has problem is not going to be eligible for participation in the month or even that, this video does not meet community guidelines and you should delete it. Because if you play it, if you make it live, it will be a strike. They can't do that. If you're recording something live rather than uploading it. So they rely on their text to speech monitoring to effectively do real-time checking real-time censorship. Yes, it is censorship. Censorship is not something only the government can do. And people are idiots for thinking that it is censorship, is that all of us do it all the time. We're all censoring something quite often ourselves, but we're also censoring what we're writing. We're censoring things that even other people are writing when we do editing, all of that is censorship and it doesn't have to be a bad thing. Censorship becomes bad when somebody does it to you and you don't like it, then all of a sudden censorship is not a good thing. If somebody yells out some really nasty insults, and instead of writing those down, I translate them into more mild insults on their behalf and then send the mild ones. That person might thank me later, say, Oh man, I was just really pissed off. I really just, I'm glad that you were, you corrected me on that before that email went out or whatever. So censorship doesn't have to be horrible and evil, but it generally is because it's usually done through an V what people consider to be a very nefarious type. Situation, because usually it's the people that are being censored that notice it and are protesting it. So anyway, in this case, YouTube is monitoring the channels in real time and it's able to trip the censorship flag as soon as they want. Now they were doing this during the the January 6th live streams that were happening. There's a lot of people streaming live that day. With the Trump's speech to the Capitol and a lot of channels didn't get their livestreams turned off, but they absolutely had their live comments turned off, which is an interesting way to do it. So obviously it was the same kind of thing. They were monitoring all live streams. That were happening at that time, the livestreams that happened to be politically related live streams, that would mention the word Washington that were the word Trump or the word Biden or any of the whole bunch of keywords. Those live streams have their chats, their live chats disabled automatically. It wasn't done on a one by one basis. It was a whole ton of channels that had to happen, but there's also other channels that were, product reviews happening. The same day, they did not have their live chat turned off. So it's absolutely based on what is coming through. As audio on the channel. I don't believe they're doing video OCR in real time. Right now I could be wrong. I don't know this for a fact, but it certainly seems like they're not doing it based on what you will see in some videos. But they we know for a fact that they are monitoring the audio from live streams and this is something actually that view of Barnes nose and. It takes advantage of, or I should say works around. That really takes advantage of, but he works around that issue because he will, when he encounters a controversial topic or something, he will stop talking and the video will change to a text like a screenshot or, a a picture of a printed sheet or something with the point that he's going to try and make hi highlighted or circled or underlined, so you can see it. And then he just, it's quiet. For like 10, 15 seconds to give you a chance to read what's on the screen without him saying anything. And then he picks up the conversation after that. So he's figured out that's a nice little way for him to not become democratized by saying a buzzword, like for example the election was rigged. Like that's clearly a buzzword. If I said that during a YouTube live stream, very high chance that live stream would get turned off. Certainly it would become democratized instantly, but it might actually be turned off. So YouTube is doing this. We know they're doing it. What can we do about it? And this was the question that was asked on view fry and Robert Barnes channel today as well is like, does Eric have any legal recourse? And my suspicion was probably not because he's not paying for that service and Barnes pretty much confirmed that. He said, there's really not much, if anything that Eric can do, because these platforms. Are the ones that provide a service for free to content creators. So a content creator can creates, like I can create my own videos. I can buy or rent a server. I can pay for the internet connectivity to that server. I can buy advertising to get people to come in to watch that video. And then at the end of the day, guaranteed, I will spend way more money. On that video, then that video will ever generate back for me. It's a way to get your message out there and pay for it rather than the way to create content that brings you money in. So what you do with YouTube and with similar services, but let's mostly focus on YouTube is you essentially enter into an agreement. And by the way, you don't get to modify the contract. They provide you with the contract that you have to agree to. In order to do this, and it's a pretty lengthy contract. Most people never bother reading it. Oh. And by the way, they get to modify it anytime they want. And you'll just get a little notice in the mail saying, Hey, we've changed the contract, just FYI. Almost no other business relationship works that way. But in this case, if you're going to rely on their bandwidth, their storage, their advertising, being in their searches, you're getting all these things for free. And what you're trading for that is that this contract is completely at their leisure. They get to cancel it anytime they want, they can deep platform. You, they can turn it off, like with Eric at any point in time. And you really can't do anything about it because. It's all in the contract that you agreed to, which is all the people that you call your subscribers. They're not really your subscribers. They're YouTube subscribers, they're YouTube subscribers to a YouTube channel, which YouTube owns and agrees to provide you with a place to store content that's on that channel. And if you're popular enough, They even agreed to share revenue from advertising, with you for content on that channel. So you do the work first, you create all the content, you promote the channel. Now they will also help you promote the channel. And if they start getting a lot of likes on the channel, they started getting a lot of activity like comments on the channel. YouTube will promote your channel more. And so they're certainly doing part of that. It's not all up to the creator to get the word out about their channel. But essentially you're trading off your content for all the free quote unquote stuff that they're doing for you so that you two combined together can share in the revenue coming off advertising from that channel. That's essentially the contract that everybody has, regardless of whether you have 50 viewers and subscribers. 15,000, like Eric 80,000, like Alison or 4,000, like Tim now, Tim Tim pool, because he does have 44,000. What are we saying? 4 million, 4 million subscribers. And incidentally, I think Steven Crowder is like six and a half million, so he was even bigger. But. These guys that are bigger, they have a little more direct one-on-one relationship. So when you get to the millions, you will have a non dedicated rep from YouTube, meaning he doesn't just work with you. Obviously he's got other people like you, he's working with, but you get somebody that you can reach out to and say, Hey, what the hell? Why can't I get this particular video to be turned down for monetization? Then that guy will go into YouTube. Find out what the deal is. Okay. Here's the deal. If you cut off these three seconds out of that video, then we can get it monetized for you. But you got to cut that out. First, a guy like Eric, isn't going to get that type of response. YouTube doesn't have the manpower nor really interest in providing that level of guidance to small YouTubers in what they need to do to maximize their ability to earn money guys like Tim. And I'm obviously using Tim and Steve Crowder on the right, even though Tim's really kind of a centrist dude, but lately he's been very much creating content that people on the right watch. But it's certainly true, just as much for CNN and other channels on YouTube, where their audience is big enough, that they get more direct support and guidance from you. So should somebody like Eric B completely distraught about the fact that he got his channel removed? Because really that could have happened at any time as per the contract that he's agreed to. And again, it's not like you're necessarily saying and beyond just clicking the OK. Button or clicking the, yes. I want to become a creator when you're first joining YouTube, but at somewhere along that path, depending on how long ago you did it, you did agree to the terms of service of being in the creative program. So the answer is yes and no on the one hand. Obviously it sucks when you have no idea why things happen around you, especially when you've dedicated hundreds, if not thousands of hours of your personal time to build up a channel. And it is probably thousands of hours for Eric. And for the big guys like Tim and Steve Crowder, it's way more than that. It's beyond tens of thousands, probably hundreds of thousands of hours, because they're not just doing one man shows it's them and a whole slew of people supporting their show in the studio and the production and the editing in the advertising, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, that are all involved in creating those products. There's a lot more man hours involved. And if, if Tim Poole is this loses his YouTube channels tomorrow, he's not going to be a happy camper, but he is doing something that I'm glad he's doing, which is he's realizing it's not a question of, if it's a question of when, even though he is pretty big, He's not big enough to fail, or I should say he is big enough to fail. He's not small enough to not fail. Okay. Now I'm confusing. Myself. Point is he could absolutely get deleted and he's realized that he's built a community on his own website. It's kind of crappy right now. They're working on trying to make it better. I and others have been recommended. They put it in a federated system so we can all be on the same federated network and get messages back and forth. We'll see what they end up doing, but the lesson here for everybody is. You can't simply rely on building your platform by signing an agreement where the agreement can be terminated at any second and time by the other party, for any reason whatsoever, because you're not willing to pay a little bit of money yourself. Like I said, in my initial example, If you don't want to get, if you don't have the possibility of being replatformed, you will have to pay for that server yourself. You will have to pay for that hosting yourself. You will pay for the bandwidth yourself. You'll pay for the marketing yourself and every other cost. But when you do that, you can't get the plant form because there's nothing deep platform. Yeah. With a little asterisk at the end. And the asterisk is. Don't freaking keep your stuff on Amazon. Amazon will deep platform. You, Jeff Bezos is a liberal. He has no problem doing that. He's not going to be looking for anything beyond personal opinion. He tells his employees who represent now, like what, he's the largest employer in the country. Now I think what his personal politics are through the messaging they get. And I can assure you. Amazon is very much a liberal company with a liberal owner. So if you would like to use Amazon services, keep that in mind. Keep in mind that if you do anything that could be perceived by a liberal person, working at Amazon as being anti-liberal or pro conservative, you are likely to at some point and Murphy's law guys, remember Murphy's law at the worst possible point. You're likely to get shut down, building a new cool app it's published for three months. Almost no one's using it. All of a sudden something clicks and you're getting a hundred thousand downloads a day. That's when you're going to get shut down. That's when your Amazon service is going to go down because of something that they didn't like. If you have controversial material please do not use Amazon. Use somebody else. Use services preferably with multiple providers. One of whom at least is outside of the United States Europe is very politically correct. Us is becoming extremely politically correct servers in other places in the world. Not so much, Africa is not horribly politically correct right now. And their bandwidth is getting better and better. There are some countries in Europe that are not politically correct, and that have great bandwidth that you can use. There are places that are. Well, let's just say they're more libertarian than they are liberal, so they may not be conservatives, but they're sure as hell not liberals. And so there are choices for you to go, but it means. It's not going to be easy. It's not just a matter of sticking your content up on YouTube, hitting the record button, hitting the upload button. Boom, you're done. So sorry to have made this whole episode. Well, no, I'm not. Sorry. I was going to say, sorry. It's all on one topic, but no, this topic needed more in-depth coverage. So I think this was exactly the time to do it. Anybody that is creating their own content, a podcast, a book. Video doesn't matter what it is. Keep in mind that when you use free services and free tools, the contract that you have with them is that they can dump you at any point in time. And you know that time's going to be exactly when Mr. Murphy comes around. Hope you enjoy this episode.

My Intro to Eric Hunley
Eric Hunley Speaks
Back to me
You are the product
What can we do to prevent this?
What you need to know as creator