Sir Gene Speaks

0110 Sir Gene Speaks with Ni**arificEnergy - Prepping

February 13, 2024 Gene Naftulyev Season 2024 Episode 110
Sir Gene Speaks
0110 Sir Gene Speaks with Ni**arificEnergy - Prepping
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Gene:

We never really got into talking about any kind of prepping stuff and you wanted to do that. And I said, great, let's do another episode. So this is the prepping episode. Anyone keeping track of that sort of thing? And I will just right off the bat caveat and say that I'm, I'm definitely not a professional prepper. Although I have run several companies that sell specifically to preppers over the years, and I've just sort of by, you know, my normal personality type, I think I have I've managed to accumulate a fair amount of things that fall into the category of. Prepping, but I do not have a underground shelter next to my house. So that kind of disqualifies me from being a professional.

Ni**arificEnergy:

I would just like to say for all of the FBI people listening that I do not have a shelter underneath my house either. I have no weapons whatsoever and I don't, I don't prep. I'm just here to learn.

Gene:

Exactly. Well, prepping is really all about LARPing. That's really the bottom line. You know what LARPing is, right? Live action role play. So this LARPing is what really, I was going to say adults, but I could probably just say men who grew up in age. And their financial abilities, but not necessarily did they grow up in terms of their mental capacity. So, so a lot of guys enjoy getting the kind of gear that you will find in call of duty. Or other video games where the latest, greatest, coolest toys exist, except getting them in the real life and living in the United States. We are at least for the time being blessed with the opportunity to get a lot, if not, certainly not all that stuff, but a lot of those things that are used in video games used by professional militaries around the world, we are able to purchase legally. So, with that in mind, and obviously. Prepping could have a lot of different areas, including like canning foods or dehydrating foods or, or having that underground bunker, or just having a, a lot of solar panels and a lot of ways to live off the grid. All of those fall in general category. What do you want to start talking about?

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right. So that's like the main question I think is, and you like touched on it a little bit, but what type of prepper are we talking about here because some people are prepping for the government to shut down. Some people are prepping for, I mean, the, the earth to turn on its side. You know what I mean? So I mean, we've touched on like the LARPing and guys who are talking about or thinking that the government's going to shut down or we're going to have some sort of political chaos, but yeah. I think a lot of people are prepping and this is like stuff that I've gone into for years now and I don't know what to, what to think of it, but the world like turning on its side and like the acceleration of the pole shifting and that causing like ice ages and for most of human history that, The Earth has been a snowball, and for most of the Earth's history, you know, it's been been mostly cold periods, which have few warm periods, and this is the longest warm period that we've been in.

Gene:

That's actually not true.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, okay.

Gene:

you're right about for most of human history, the Earth has been a snowball. That is correct. But we are right now technically still in a defrost from the last ice age

Ni**arificEnergy:

Ices. Right,

Gene:

If you look at the majority of Earth's history. Which humans comprise of just the very last small fraction of a percentage of the Earth's history. The average Earth temperature that we've been able to extrapolate from measurements of ice cores, wood samples and rocks we're roughly eight degrees below the average temperature of the planet right now. So. We're talking about panic setting in over a fraction of a degree increase. But keep in mind that the temperatures have been slowly going up for the last 100, 000 years with some ups and downs because we've had global warming events and global cooling events during that time. But in general, they've been increasing. But they've been increasing because we're still recovering from the last real deep ice age. And we

Ni**arificEnergy:

for sure.

Gene:

quite a ways to go. And you look at the, the, the period in time when the earth contained infinitely more, well, I shouldn't say infinitely, but vastly more species of animals and insects, and we had gigantic insects, we had large lizards, those. Oh, yeah. Yeah, the the God, I forget what the giant centipede name was. Our, our, our crow, or I think Arthur plural. That was it. And you know, a lot of that was possible due to combination of factors. One was a warmer planet earth to a much higher oxygen percentage in planet earth. And three, a higher CO2 percentage, which allowed so much vegetation to grow and prosper that it was then able to generate more oxygen and people say, well, wait a minute, how can you have both more oxygen and more CO2 because CO2 takes the oxygen and then turns into CO2. So if there's more CO2, there's less action. That's actually a. A fallacy because it's oversimplification of what happens the amounts of carbon that combines with oxygen to form CO2 is measured in parts per million. The amount of oxygen in the atmosphere is measured in percent in which is literally oxygen makes up I believe it's It's around 20%, maybe 22 percent of the total atmosphere of the planet. So CO2 is a tiny amount, so we can absolutely have a higher percentage of oxygen and oxygen was as high as 34%. Of the atmosphere during the which I'm going to forget which of the, the, the seat. Yeah. Which of the errors that was in, but it was basically the, the one that was predates the dinosaurs. It was during the, I think it was the, the one at the very start of the Cambrian. Where you had the earth sitting at about 34 percent oxygen, where you could support much larger organisms because the higher the percentage of oxygen is, the more surface area you need to be able to breathe. And we would know this in modern days from COVID because when people were suffering from COVID effects with diminished lung capacity, because You know, there's fluid in your lines. There's this storm, which creates all kinds of issues with, your lungs no longer being able to take in the action from the little. Little bags that I forget what they're called that are make up your lungs a way to make sure that people are still getting the appropriate amount of action is to put them on either in the beer bariatric chamber, or just to plug them in. So they're breathing a higher content of action, which is exactly what I did when I had coded. I, I bought a machine for the house and then so, I actually was normally my house is running at about a thousand parts per million CO2. I prefer a high CO2 environment, but during the actual COVID. I was actually breathing 67 percent pure oxygen and you know, I went through COVID just fine. It's no, no major issues or long term negative effects from it. And of course I never use any vaccine bullshit. So, I just treated the disease and moved on. So,

Ni**arificEnergy:

What is that what is the advantage of a high CO2 environment that you like?

Gene:

well, there's a couple of things. First of all, plans grow better

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right, yeah. I understand that for sure. I'm talking about for you specifically.

Gene:

yeah, yeah. Well, I think, again, we, we think that the way things were last year is the way they've always been. And that is just contrary to reality. So, if you look at the history. Even during the last roughly million years or so that, that our ancestors have been around, or even the last hundred thousand years that Homo sapiens have been walking around in most of the world, the amount of CO2 has been higher at times and it has correlated to larger growth in in food production. So like the, the great harvest years that our ancestors Experiencing where at times that correlated with higher co2 during those years. And so, it is not a problem for me, I'm only going to speak for myself because we don't give any kind of advice, no legal or medical advice on this show. But speaking for myself, I have. Absolutely zero problem being in the, the highest I've done is 3, 000 parts per million, which is, it's, it's just beyond what medically they say is potentially problematic, but I, you know, I like to do my own testing, a lot of things. And I felt perfectly fine in the house at 3000 parts per million CO2. Outdoors generally right now, we're running at about 450, 460 in the house. I'm usually around a thousand, a little over a thousand. And this is something that I've been measuring for roughly 12 years now. So I've, I've actually got in the same house, in the same environment, 12 years of data points.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, see, I look at so I look at things from an athletic standpoint because that's like where my background is. And we're trying to build hyperbaric chambers that have basically all oxygen. So

Gene:

of that. That's how you end up with explosions.

Ni**arificEnergy:

right, right. But yeah, like increasing the oxygen percentage for us, it helps us heal.

Gene:

Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah.

Ni**arificEnergy:

so yeah, it's interesting. I've just never heard that perspective of Oh, okay. Well, we're, I know that

Gene:

Yeah. But again, keep in mind, CO2 is a tiny change in the amount of CO2. It's you're going from way less than 1 percent to still way less than 1%. So you can double, triple, quadruple the amount of CO2 in your atmosphere without any adverse effects. As far as I'm concerned for me Of being a result of that increase in CO2, is there a benefit to you as a human with increased CO2? I, I think the only potential long term benefit and it is only long term is just being less sensitive to high CO2

Ni**arificEnergy:

Okay.

Gene:

because I'm in that environment. Anytime I'm in the house, that means if I happen to be in a shopping mall or something, or in a movie theater, and there's way too many people and everyone's breathing really hard or whatever. I'm just not going to be sensitive to that. Like people that have never been above four 50 might be. But it's not like there's any physical or, you know, disease related. I don't recommend people do this. Certainly. I don't recommend that. And the only reason I'm doing it is a, as an express, a long term experiment and B because it's, it's good for plants in my house. And I, I don't grow pot if people are wondering, I'm not living inside of a pot grow house with high CO2 levels. I mostly actually grow potatoes and I grow them indoors and it's kind of my that does touch a little bit on the whole prepping thing because I always have potatoes growing all year long indoors.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah. I was gonna ask you how is, how is that, that must be pretty awesome.

Gene:

Well, they're kind of cool. I mean, they're not the

Ni**arificEnergy:

Catan or what are you, what are we getting into? What kind of potatoes we got?

Gene:

You know, I, the Idaho potatoes from the store. It's pretty basic. I don't go looking for heirloom seeds or anything like that. No, it's just, I found that if you, if you Like certain brand of potatoes, you can plant them about, about a quarter of them will actually germinate. So that's good enough for me. So watch all of it sued by Monsanto or some shit. We're illegally growing their potato strain. But it's kind of neat just to have your own growing plants that are producing food in the house year long year round. I should say I've tried other stuff like carrots. Don't like to grow indoors for whatever reason. I guess they want more sunlight or something. Potatoes are fine. They're actually kind of, a fairly all viney kind of. Plant so they actually will grab onto my the what do you call it? The the thing next to the window, the the shades

Ni**arificEnergy:

Gotcha.

Gene:

I'll grab onto the window shades and just kind of hook in between the slats on the shades

Ni**arificEnergy:

Ah,

Gene:

and then use the shade as a way to hang it on. And so they're, you know, they're, they're wanting to stick their leaves out right next to the window to get sunshine, which is great. But yeah, in general, I also have an I should say I had. An avocado plant growing like that, that I grew from a seed as well. Now could I'll be,

Ni**arificEnergy:

like?

Gene:

it was good until I accidentally killed it. So. I was too, because I let it grow for about a year and then I kind of accidentally kill it. So it wasn't, it never got to the point of actually delivering me avocado plant fruit.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, it takes years

Gene:

been kind of neat to do that, but it certainly grows indoors. It didn't have any problem growing indoors. But I

Ni**arificEnergy:

I grew weed.

Gene:

well, that, that could also grow indoors, but I hear that everywhere.

Ni**arificEnergy:

It does grow everywhere. I was a little bit more scientific with it and I got the very, very large, beautiful plants out of it.

Gene:

Okay.

Ni**arificEnergy:

But all,

Gene:

or regular. What

Ni**arificEnergy:

allegedly no, just regular. I had a live soil, actually. Yeah, so I just I had to feed my soil as well as the plants. was really awesome. It was like a micro haze, a bunch of different mixtures of different chemicals and stuff. I can get you the book that taught me all this stuff.

Gene:

Well, I just mentioned it. I mean, I don't, yeah, it

Ni**arificEnergy:

It's just called the, it's called the grow book. That's it. That's what it's called. Yeah. I mean, honestly, you could grow anything out of this book. It's very, very good, but it's more specifically geared towards growing marijuana and specific strains of marijuana.

Gene:

Yeah. And I mean, I like, I do manage the pH of the soil with chemicals just to keep it level that I wanted that. And then I've got Oh this, as far as the soil, I, I usually buy Michigan, upper Michigan, upper peninsula peat. And I have that shipped in and use that because that's, that's like some of the best soil in the country.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Okay.

Gene:

Which is probably excessive and unnecessary, but I, I, I tend to do it. Cause

Ni**arificEnergy:

They're your babies, you know what I mean? I

Gene:

you know, why

Ni**arificEnergy:

a, I went with a mix of cocoa, flour, a bunch of things to keep moisture. And then a little bit of rocks, but like mostly just like really, really high quality dirt, fat guano. Bunch of different things. It's really

Gene:

yeah, that that could be really strong fertilizer and then I've got isopods in there that will clean up any kind of debris that needs to get cleaned up. And then I've got spiders eating the isopods that, so I've got a little ecosystem in there, but really predominantly it's, it's just. Being able to have a constant year round supply of food growing. And it's not like I'm growing enough food that I'm eating only potatoes that I grow myself. That's not the goal. The goal is to have something that if I need to, that I can then transplant and multiply and start to grow a lot more of. So it's really more like keeping a small flame burning in case you need to build a larger fire.

Ni**arificEnergy:

That's actually a really good concept. It's almost like a swing training, you know, like you're just investing in this a little bit at a time

Gene:

the way I look at it, like prepping is really, it's all about just in case,

Ni**arificEnergy:

right

Gene:

yeah, you may not need any of this stuff, but just in case I also have, I, I keep somewhere around maybe 200 gallons of water. In the house,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Okay. Yeah. Water is always really, really good to

Gene:

yeah, which is, and, and it's 200 gallons of distilled water. So it's all pure from any kind of little critters getting in there. And for, for really a single dude, you know, 200 gallons can last me a damn long time. That's, and I think everybody should keep some water. And that it's really up to you to determine what is. What you feel is the correct amount, but I know from practical experience, like back three years ago here in Texas, I went for five days with no electricity in the middle of winter. And that was not fun. And I didn't have a generator back then at the time I do now. And so, you know, the stores were closed, everything shut down. There were definitely people that, and of course there was a do not drink the water. Advisory, because when there's no power and all this shit's happening, you know, the, the power plants aren't adequately cleaning or not the power plant, the water plants are not treating the water properly. So you shouldn't be drinking and that's assuming your pipes didn't freeze like a lot of people's froze. So,

Ni**arificEnergy:

in Texas during that time. Yeah, so I lived in just outside of Dallas in Flower Mound at that

Gene:

okay.

Ni**arificEnergy:

And so yeah it was like really weird. Bucky's kept my family alive at that time, which is

Gene:

Oh, dude, Bucky's is so awesome.

Ni**arificEnergy:

I know, they're so great.

Gene:

it's every opportunity I get to stop at a Bucky's, I stop at a Bucky's. There. There's you, you have to be out of town.'cause they're always spread around a little further outside the civilized areas where the land is cheaper, obviously. But yeah, it, it's, I I love bringing people that are new to Texas, out to qui. He's oh yeah, and this is a Texas sized gas station for y'all.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yep. So we have in the northeast, we have Wawa, and people up here really love Wawa. And then when I take my friends to Buc ee's, it's like Of a world changer, like an Oodaloop in their brain. It's just it's so hilarious. Cause they can't fathom a universe better than Wawa. And then it is. So it's yeah, it's really awesome.

Gene:

is like a a Walmart size gas station.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah.

Gene:

It's, I mean, or certainly a target size targets. I think are a little small in Walmarts, but it's like a target

Ni**arificEnergy:

with barbecue.

Gene:

destination. Yeah. Yeah. Tons of barbecue options. They've got roast. They've, they've got tons of beef jerky available, all the different varieties of drinks with and without sugar. You got your Mr. Frosty knockoffs. You've got all that stuff. And then tons of different products that you may have forgotten on your drive to wherever you're going. And tons of things that you never knew you needed until you walk into a Buc ee's as well. So we are you still in Dallas or yet?

Ni**arificEnergy:

So I am home in New Jersey. That's where I grew up.

Gene:

Okay. I knew you grew up there, but I wasn't sure that's where you're currently living.

Ni**arificEnergy:

again, we're just here on vacation a little bit visiting our parents because our parents never got to see our kids because our first kid was born the first day that they locked down the country.

Gene:

Oh, wow.

Ni**arificEnergy:

So yeah, we have a three, two and one year old

Gene:

Well, I can see why now.

Ni**arificEnergy:

yeah. Yep. Had those COVID babies, you know, there's nothing else to do.

Gene:

exactly.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Hey, you are cute.

Gene:

Nothing wrong with that, man. Nothing wrong with that.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, that's right, man.

Gene:

and then, so you're, you're there for how long or when you, when are you coming back to your house?

Ni**arificEnergy:

Actually in a couple weeks, wait, our wife, she just gave me the timer. It's 13 days. So

Gene:

Oh, wow. Okay.

Ni**arificEnergy:

yeah, yeah, we'll be

Gene:

and then where's that? Where's the house?

Ni**arificEnergy:

We'll be going to probably Killeen or East Texas. We'll be buying a new house.

Gene:

Oh, nice. Okay.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah. So we'll see what happens. We're trying, I'm trying to get out of out of the cities. So we might go to

Gene:

good idea.

Ni**arificEnergy:

versus Killeen, which is Gatesville is like a little bit like Forty minutes north of it, but I honestly really like East Texas. They have a ton of like small towns that don't even basically recognize Texas as their authority, which is hilarious. Everyone thinks in the universe of Texas is the most free plates. And then there's people in out of Texas who are just like, don't ever tell me what to do. I'm from Texas. So yeah, that's kind of awesome. I really liked that.

Gene:

So I used to live in Frisco and you definitely get tired of the flatness up in Dallas. I know I did and that, and you know, being either East Texas where you have a lot more bigger trees and just more of a forested type environment or being further West in the Hill Those are both good options to kind of break up the flat monotony. Of of DFW I would say also Houston for being close to the water. The problem is Houston has got a hundred percent humidity for half the year. That kind of takes it out of consideration,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, that and the crime too it's pretty it's not as bad as other places,

Gene:

but there's different parts of Houston. Yeah,

Ni**arificEnergy:

yeah, for sure we we, we don't want to be anywhere near any cities. That's like another part of prepping that I think that gets missed, is that people are, like, in cities that's the worst place to ever be.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, no, that's absolutely true. I ideally, you want to be somewhere that's far enough away. That you're, you're able to get enough land to be sort of self sufficient if you want to be like I, one of the guys I had on the podcast last year is a buddy of mine named Tucker Max, who has written a few books and then ended up selling his book company and sort of kind of doing what you're doing, you know, he's, he's being Mr. Mom and home and he bought, or well, they bought, I want to say a 70 acres, 60 acres, somewhere around there. And so he's, he's got a herd of goats. He's got four cows. I think they're all steer. I think they're all for food. I don't think they're doing any milk cows. It's got, you know, chickens and all of these critters basically just. Walk around and feed themselves like he's not having to do something special because he's got enough land to where all of this is just sort of on the hobby slash autopilot, but also you know, his freezers filled with meat that he's butchered himself or had a butcher come out and help him,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right.

Gene:

rather than buying it at the grocery store. Same thing with plenty of vegetables and. And then also he's gotten into the whole prepping thing quite a bit as well. So he's got the house outfitted with infrared flashlights or, you know, lamps on the house. He's got night vision goggles for every member of the family. So yeah, he's having fun with it. And like I said, part of it, he also has a gun range that's 200 feet away from the house, which is great. I've gotten out there to sign in some of my guns and.

Ni**arificEnergy:

awesome.

Gene:

Yeah, it's, it's, that's definitely one of my eventual goals is to get far enough out of the city and I, I've been looking at land, but I, I've been threatening to leave Austin now for probably eight years. So I haven't done it.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Honestly, bro, if you haven't done it at this point,

Gene:

it's been a while. I, you know, when I moved in here, I figured I would stay in Austin for about three to four years. Because that's about how long I've stayed in every other place I lived. And that was 12 years ago. So it's, it's been kind of crazy. I watched Austin changed dramatically. I watched it completely collapse with what happened during COVID. It's mostly back, but it's a very different city now because the percentage of people that work for Apple, Google Oracle. You know, you name it. California company is really big here. The, I talked about this on the other podcast too. One of the crazy, crazy things in Austin that you have that you see if you've been here a while, like I have is a shift in population to these sort of. I don't want to use the term yuppie because it's, it's very eighties term, but essentially 20 something year old software related people. They're not even necessarily developers, but they might do something that's related to software. They're all in their twenties. They're all making over 200 grand a year. They all own a Tesla. None of them drive the Teslas because they take Ubers everywhere they go. And so they basically have a Tesla that just parked in their garage because all their friends have a Tesla as well. And in a lot of ways they're making substantially more than people that are doing real jobs, but they're also, they're kind of naive in an awful lot of things about life.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right. They're not contributing to society in a normal sense that like normal human beings

Gene:

I wouldn't even go that far just to say things like they have no clue how to change a tire

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh yeah. So I think that that's, don't you think that's like sort of generational though?

Gene:

Yeah, I think

Ni**arificEnergy:

Are our back in the day, our manuals for cars used to teach you how to tune your engine. now they tell you not to drink the oil, you know, so like it's

Gene:

exactly.

Ni**arificEnergy:

human beings are

Gene:

Yeah. They, I remember when they started putting plastic covers on car engines. So you open up the hood. And then you see this very nice, pretty looking plastic cover. And I'm like, what the fuck is that all about? Why do you need a plastic cover? You already opened the hood. That means you're going to be doing something to the engine. Why would you cover the engine with yet another cover? And I think a lot of people don't know that that's a cover. They think that's the engine.

Ni**arificEnergy:

That's your engine, right? Right, right. Yeah But also how many idiots just tried to fix their own car while it was hot and just touch that, you

Gene:

Oh yeah. Yeah,

Ni**arificEnergy:

so yeah people

Gene:

as well, but you know, that's how you learn things back in my day

Ni**arificEnergy:

No, I don't disagree with you. But like now

Gene:

break a leg, you learn not to do it again.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, now we have lawyers. They're lurking

Gene:

Mm hmm.

Ni**arificEnergy:

at playgrounds and stuff like that. It's a, it's really crazy. I was, I was wondering for a little while, why there weren't new parks and playgrounds being built in a bunch of different places. And that's the reason because a bunch of those places, I mean, people will just sit

Gene:

Yeah.

Ni**arificEnergy:

and they don't want the liability at all. So yeah, like the world is like becoming a way easier place for some people. And at the same time, it's becoming very, very difficult for others. So I think, to keep with the theme of prepping, I think that, that preppers, they're, it's tough, because I'm one of these people, so I obviously think that I'm correct. But I do think that they're, they tend towards being correct, because the universe just tends towards more and more craziness, and nobody's putting any quirks back on to the bottle, you know what I mean?

Gene:

Yeah, and I think that this is 1 of those areas where the value of knowing how to do things and doing things that may be risky is going to become parent. If there's some kind of negative thing that happens. And all of a sudden, you quickly separate the people that can actually take care of themselves from the people that don't know what to do. And it's, it's sad, but the reality is. can't take care of those people you have to let them die.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, yeah. It's definitely more triage. You're just like, okay, well, and this is why I brought the prepping into or

Gene:

Mm hmm.

Ni**arificEnergy:

conversation about the ice age and stuff into it as well, because eventually we are creating the people who are going to have to survive the next ice age. I do know that we're coming out of an ice age, but we're going, the warming periods do not last long on this planet at all. So yeah, I think that we, we are building the people who have to survive the next Ice Age. So, I think that

Gene:

I think it'll be a while. But yeah, I mean, I get

Ni**arificEnergy:

for sure, for sure, for sure. Yeah.

Gene:

It's

Ni**arificEnergy:

yeah, it's That's

Gene:

I think it all starts. Yeah, it all starts with do relying less on. Yeah. others and relying more on yourself and things you can do. And that's why. You know, conversations like, well, do you have a couple of hundred gallons of water at home? And if you don't, why not? And, and do you have a few months worth of food supply at home? And then if you don't, why not? A lot of these things are just a question of a little bit of money. I mean, you think about it, what's 100 gallons of water cost? About a hundred dollars if you want super clean water and basically a couple of dollars if you just pump the water right out of your you know, out of your kitchen faucet,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Spega, yeah.

Gene:

it's, it's not going to cost much at all. In fact, if your toilet leaks the, like the, the. The thing that closes up the the toilet, you know, letting it flush, which occasionally you need to get replaced. And a lot of people don't know how to replace those as either those plugs, but if, if that plug is leaking, you'll easily see. 500 to a thousand gallons worth of wasted water in your water bill. It takes nothing at all. Just a little just a drip from your kitchen faucet that is at about this speed of drip, drip, drip. That's about one gallon per hour.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh yeah.

Gene:

that tiny amount of water drops adds up over the course of an hour. So about one drip per second. And that comes out to about a gallon per hour. So having a hundred or a few hundred gallons of water is a minimal amount of money. And it guarantees you a certain peace of mind that you certainly don't have. If you open up the fridge and you see like a couple of six packs of beer, some milk, no juice and

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh yeah.

Gene:

water. And, and you're like, Oh shit, now what my water's, I can't drink my water at home. Or you, you know, then you go and do risky things like, well, I'm going to filter or boil this dirty water and then I'll have something well. Yeah, worst case scenario, if you have no options, that's what you do, but you'd like to have options, options are preferred.

Ni**arificEnergy:

And I think, honestly, about prepping you, you're really just trying to survive the first three months. Because after the first three months, the population is gonna drop so far dramatically that it's gonna basically reset the goods. Versus what person, like what people need and what people can use as usable land, I think it'll reset that so much that people, there'll be less violence.

Gene:

Yeah, I think you're absolutely right. Let me mention a book series here. I don't know if you've read it or not, but I highly recommended something that Ben got me started on with just a good old boys, which is the going home series by a American. A stands for angry and it's a series of 12 books and it starts off with a guy, very typical kind of it working, you know, mid forties kind of guy or late thirties, whatever he is driving out to a client visit. That's about 50, 60 miles away from the house. And then his engine dies and then he quickly realizes that. All the cars, engines died starts to piece together. There was some kind of an EMP event, whether it was a sunspot related thing, or whether it was a weapons or anything, don't know. But the bottom line is anything that relied on microchips no longer works. And so he has to make his way back home. That's what the first book is about is basically him spending over a week. And walking back the 50 or 60 miles that he only took about an hour. To drive away from his house in the first few pages of the book. Because obviously it's way slower when you're walking, when no one has technology, and then as he encounters a lot of the people and their reactions and their level of preparedness and what you find, and I think this is statistically true, is that the vast majority of people are not prepared to survive even three days, far be it. A couple of weeks or several months, so people will literally be out of food, out of water, out of heat, out of clothes, out of everything within a matter of several days because they're so used to a just in time society.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah. The vast majority of people, like from things that I've read will die within the first two weeks. And then some people who have we're like the big gangsters or people who may be bonded together with other people who are a little bit more prepared, they will survive. And then after a couple of months, those factions will start to either fight each other for resources or someone will take control. And then that's when you start to see peace.

Gene:

Have you read this book? It sure sounds like it.

Ni**arificEnergy:

I have not, I've just read a bunch of things like it. It's hilarious.

Gene:

need to pick it up. It's all fiction, obviously, but it's, it's well done, well written. And I'm actually reading series from the same guy. So the first series deals with the guy that, you know, is making his way home and he lived up in the burbs kind of away from the city. And then the second series of books deals with people that were in the city. I think it's in Orlando and it's way worse for people in the city. There's no, no two ways about it. But,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Lawlessness, and I saw this because I have friends and family members who were in Katrina at the same time, and as soon as the levees broke, and no one knew what was going on, I think the mayor was fighting with the president at that time police officers were raiding people's houses to get food. They were just literally stealing people's stuff.

Gene:

they were the ones whose guns of course.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right, right, right. So, it's, it's, That was only, what, four days? Five days? That like the audit to devolve into like madness and

Gene:

Yeah. I think the first day everybody tries to help the second day, a lot of people are only helping themselves. And by the third day, people start attacking others.

Ni**arificEnergy:

oh yeah, for sure. Cause it's I know how many rations I have left. I'm starting to look at you very, very differently. See, that's another thing. Like it's, it's more geared towards like my, my level of, I want to prep is geared towards how many catastrophes are out there. Even like you just mentioned, solar flare or EMP blast could. Hit us pretty hard. I mean, like China could launch an EMP blast at us and take Taiwan and like,

Gene:

China had a balloon float above us for a week and we couldn't do anything about it.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, yeah. So another thing about that is I think that's interesting that I know about Ray Dalio is when he was looking to make oil investments, he pulled the data from the satellites to see how full the containers were

Gene:

Mm

Ni**arificEnergy:

to make his offer on how much the oil market was worth at that time. There are so many different things and information standpoints that they could have collected from us. It's unreal. Like they, it's like, why? The only reason is that obviously Biden's corrupted by them. But any president who's worth his salt, who wants to actually help America, there's no way they would have just shot that thing down immediately.

Gene:

hmm. Mm

Ni**arificEnergy:

But yeah, it's we live in such a strange, strange world and I, I do think that with even with the national divorce that we are really barreling down the hill towards that will cause its own civil unrest. And are people prepared for that? Are people in, in their own communities? Are they, like you said, getting a hundred gallons of water? Are they're getting food rations? Another thing that you can have is like during collapses that doesn't work. Months and months down the line, but like during the collapse money starts to hyper inflate

Gene:

hmm. Mm

Ni**arificEnergy:

you have small bills, it's really really helpful ones fives So that way you're not overpaying for everything like people will have twenty dollar bills or hundred dollar bills well, if you're only if that guy only has a gallon or a hundred gallons of water, you're trading a lot of money for a very little bit of things. So just little small things that people can do, having gold on their hands because after the paper money is gonna get burnt, you're gonna need small divisional gold pieces to hand out to people

Gene:

Yeah, I'm not, I'm not a fan of gold. I'll tell you that right away because if you're sitting there in Katrina and your house is flooded up to the knees and your basement is completely flooded and you know, you have an upstairs freezer or something that still is cool enough that it's kept food in there. Somebody said, I'll give you I'll give you this this 500 piece of gold for that. Well, you don't know what tomorrow is going to be like you're not likely to make jewelry or rare materials. For something that is immediately useful. So I've always told people the most valuable metal that you're going to see during a catastrophe is lead. If you want to trade ammo, everyone will happily trade ammo. You want to trade gold for ammo? I'm going to charge you equal weight. I'll give you the same weight of lead as you give me of gold. That's that's my trade during a catastrophe.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, no, no, no, that's it's definitely something else good to have for sure Bullets will trade like dollars as they used to I mean like in back in the old western times bullets traded like dollars

Gene:

Yeah,

Ni**arificEnergy:

like whatever you can barter with I I

Gene:

exactly.

Ni**arificEnergy:

I tend to think about it a little bit differently, because I don't think that society will sustain itself in those dark times. I do think that keeping that gold, as long as you can sustain it, and you definitely are going to be hyper inflating all the food that you're giving out for that gold, obviously. But yeah, I think that

Gene:

I think if you want to have gold just to have something after the three months, I'm okay with that. I just don't think gold is going to be a useful trait because gold is literally the opposite of what we just said about small bills. Because if you want to, if you want to get a gallon of gasoline, let's say, or something, something that's a commodity, something that you just need in order to consume it and you don't have a 20 bill, but you do have 100. No one's giving you a change back for the a hundred. It's going to cost you a hundred to get that. Same thing with the gold. No one's going to give you change back for trading gold. It's Oh, all you got is this, this you know, gold 500 piece. What used to be worth 500 bucks. All right. That's, that's how much it's going to be either that or a hundred dollar bill or 20 bill. Your choice.

Ni**arificEnergy:

right? They do

Gene:

it's all going to be above the same value.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right now, I agree with you to a certain extent. They do have small like divisional pieces. So like I can break off 10 pieces of gold. So like they're like, like little, not flaky, but like they are mendable enough that you can break them out. So like the market is kind of solving that problem by itself. But I do agree with you that you are, if it's gold, both your. Betting that you're going to survive the worst of it and keep your food and all the rest of the stuff, be able to protect all that stuff with

Gene:

Cause you're, you're never going to get. Even in best case scenario, you're never going to get the gold conversion that you will have to pay to buy it right now. What's the gold at right now? I don't even know.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh my gosh, it's insane. It's 2, 000 or something. Yeah, a little

Gene:

2, 000 an ounce. I remember when it was 400 an ounce. So 2, 000 an ounce, you buy right now at 2, 000 an ounce. If something happens where you have to use gold for trade, no one in their right mind is going to give you any more than about 200 an ounce. It just makes no sense because gold, you can't do anything with that gold. It's other than use it for jewelry. You know, it's there's no set government body to set the, the rate of exchange for it. It's going to be a complete buyer's market. Well, if you want to buy my shit now,

Ni**arificEnergy:

for some, yeah, for some time. I definitely agree with

Gene:

a 50 pack of ammo, a lot more than I can use 500 bucks worth of gold.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, I agree. There are definitely things that are going to be worth more. And even like I said, like with the paper money, like having small denominations, like I have 20, 000 in ones. There's

Gene:

a lot of ones, man. That's

Ni**arificEnergy:

good, there's a really good chance that I'm going to be burning a lot of that, like a really good chance. But also, to have it is I mean, to not have it to me is I panic.

Gene:

I'm right there with you as far as I think for any kind of event that happens, cash is what you live on for the first week because everyone will still take cash in lieu of purely barter after a

Ni**arificEnergy:

because they think it's going to bounce back.

Gene:

Yeah, yeah, exactly

Ni**arificEnergy:

We know different, but

Gene:

cash. But so what I always tell people is, you know, you're think about a scenario where you don't have electricity for a week. So everything that you get for that week including, you know, maybe buying a generator because you forgot to do it before you're going to have to do with cash. So that should be the minimum amount of cash. Times two that you keep at home in a safe at all times. That's your bare minimum. That doesn't include things like getting, you know, laid off from work or some non catastrophe event. This is purely for catastrophes. In general, I recommend that people keep three months worth of cash on hand, like not for this type of emergency, but more for financial emergencies.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, I recommend six, but

Gene:

if, well, that's, I mean, good, because you're probably more right. But I, but I say at least three, most people don't even keep a month's worth of cash on hand,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, yeah, I mean, most people can't afford a 500 emergency, you know,

Gene:

right?

Ni**arificEnergy:

it's really rough. It's really rough. The world is really rough. I try not to think about it.

Gene:

It is. It's bad. So yeah, six months. I mean, that's, that's obviously even better. And then keep in mind that if you've got relatives or other, or close friends that you're going to end up having around you during that emergency, you're going to want to probably live together or at least close by. You're going to want to make sure that your plans are coordinated as to who's doing what, who's keeping watch and who's making dinner. All

Ni**arificEnergy:

So who is, so like to me, like my family aren't preppers, like they're a bunch of Democrats. I honestly I honestly, I'm just like, they're triage as well. You know what I mean? Like they are, they are probably not going to survive the culling, you know? So I just kind of think should I be, or how many people can I make friends with who are also preppers? Like you, you just said that like you have run several like prepping companies, I definitely want to get into that pretty soon. But yeah, like I I'm, I'm more interested in. Becoming friends with those type of people because they, I tend to think that they're right and they're, I'm going to have a much better community with them that I will try to teach my brother how to shoot a gun and my mom, how to do anything

Gene:

it's sad, but it is reality. And I, I agree with that a hundred percent is that you know, the difference between your family and friends is that friends are people that actually want something to do with you. Family are people that have to do something with you. So, yeah, you want the best for your family, obviously, but you also can't just take care of them in spite of themselves. And, and so, yeah, so I, I totally agree. I think you just make more friends over time that share your values that share your beliefs and odds are, especially if you move out. A little bit out of town out to more of the country and I'd say kind of that borderline is probably around 60 to 70 miles outside of a city is where you really start seeing a difference in mentality between people that are city people and people that are country people or countries as they would call themselves.

Ni**arificEnergy:

That's right.

Gene:

and it's, yeah, I, I, I definitely want to do that. I'd like to do that. I've, I enjoy living close to the city. I'm just You know, south of downtown and Austin. So everything's really close nearby and when there's no issues or problems that makes for a nice life, but also realistically that is going to make for a horrible place to be when shit hits the fan. And so it's important to my current plan is basically I've got everything. In crates and boxes, and it's a matter of loading up my car and heading down the road, but ideally, I want to be in a place where I don't have to do that. Right. Where I can just hunker down and stay in a place without having to go to 1 of my friends places. So I, I think that's a. That the better situation, if you can manage it, but whether you can manage it or not, you always want to have more options because, you know, like I had power out for five days straight. I had friends that live 20 miles away that never lost power. it's kind of like, well, shit, that's not fair. So you, you always want to have options and know enough people to where, rather than trying to go at it alone or go at trying to survive. I've. Shit hits the fan scenario where you're in the middle of the worst of it. If you have people, you know, that didn't get hit or didn't get hit as hard. That always is your best option is can you just, even if temporarily just scooch over their way and then make your way back as needed or, you know, it's at some point, your, your main prime directive in your head switches to survival mode rather than existence mode. Like my existence includes all the shit that I have, all my stuff, all my fun toys, all my video games. You know, all this stuff is part of my existence, but a lot of it disappears when I'm thinking in survival mode. Mm-Hmm.

Ni**arificEnergy:

I don't know. Yeah, I totally agree with you. I think like for me, that's what I'm learning about. Like now, like what to keep in my bug out bag how many of them I should keep my truck bag, just like learning how to do CQB when I go home, both solo and with my wife, how to protect our kids we're going to be getting dogs and stuff when we get home, like a Connie Corso and a German shepherd So yeah, just two dogs, cause we have, I mean, we're gonna have four kids, so

Gene:

Mm-Hmm?

Ni**arificEnergy:

it's enormously dangerous for me to be the only man and protective force, so yeah

Gene:

going, man.

Ni**arificEnergy:

yeah, I got, I have a son, but he's two, and

Gene:

Oh, well, you know,

Ni**arificEnergy:

I got him

Gene:

nothing happens until he's about 12.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Exactly. I got him shooting Nerf

Gene:

Oh dude, I had, slightly off topic, but the kids thing remind me. So I went to my cardiologist recently and I haven't been for a while. I don't, I don't not have any issues or anything, but you know, I'm at that age where I should be seeing him on a regular basis. And he walks into the room before he asked me like how I'm doing or, you know, anything wrong. He just gets into talking about his guns. And over like 20 minutes, we're just sitting there talking about guns and he's all proud of the fact that he he got his nine year old son. He bought him a BB gun to get him started in learning how to shoot. You know, hopefully a couple of years later, he'll be able to get a 22 rifle and actually shoot. And I, I hope more people are having this experience. Then just me, but I think it is somewhat unusual still that you're, you have doctors that are very gun friendly might happen to be, but it's it's one of those things that, you know, you'd never know who you may encounter who shares your beliefs and it's important to make those connections when nothing's going on, when nothing's

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, I agree with you a hundred percent. Yeah, that's I wish that our community, I'll say three things about this. I wish that our community on Twitter was better about that. About getting into smaller groups and like really vetting people out like specifically obviously We just had a couple people come across our feed who definitely were not who they say they were which is like really funny because people make fun of jordan peterson for not wanting people to be anonymous online and They all got angry at that but then got duped by those people who was like Well, that person presented themselves as what they weren't. So, yeah but yeah, doing that up front right now, and I always tell people my, my call sign's gonna be my name, so you guys are gonna have to nut up a little bit.

Gene:

That's great.

Ni**arificEnergy:

But I also I read this story once about a 13 year old, and this was like back in like the Wild Wild West days, a couple bandits came, stole two of his sisters, and just rode off, and then the 13 year old boy, the father's off at work, 13 year old boy just gets on his horse, follows them, seven days later he comes back, With his two sisters. He rode off with a rifle, came back with his two sisters, and it's that level of rugged individualism is what we're going to definitely need in the next generation, for sure.

Gene:

Oh yeah. Yeah. Well, you,

Ni**arificEnergy:

matter what happens. No matter what cataclysm happens.

Gene:

Yeah, exactly. You've heard the adage. I can't remember who coined it. I'm horrible with names, but it's was it bad times create strong men,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh yes, yes, yes.

Gene:

strong men create good times, good times, create weak men, weak men, create bad

Ni**arificEnergy:

Hard times.

Gene:

hard times. Yeah. Yeah. But it's yeah, I'm sure I butchered it, but the idea I think is kind of true because you're going through. Essentially a flip flopping or a pendulum effect on people's priorities and their, their commitments between individualism and the collectivism. And a a friend of mine wrote a book about this a number of years back, I think 15 years ago now called Pendulum. And it details historically looking back at that both North America and, but also Europe and the history thereof as seeing a pattern of the pendulum swing between these two opposing forces. So in that book, the peak of individualism was 1983. That's the last peak that it hit. And so after 83 for the rest of the eighties, nineties, two thousands, the pendulum was swinging in the opposite direction toward collectivism, and it's a 40 year cycle, which means we hit peak collectivism last year in 2023. And right now we are in the first year of the pendulum swinging back in a 40 year arc. So we're about two and a half percent into being less. Collectivist than we were last year right now. So it's barely noticeable, but we've made the change in heading in the opposite direction. So we'll see if this pattern continues.

Ni**arificEnergy:

I'm going to definitely read that book,

Gene:

yeah, you should. So Roy Williams is the author of the book. Roy Williams he actually wrote the forward to one of my books. He is a multi New York times bestselling author. And a very, very intelligent guy. But he. He did that book with another guy that I know, but Roy's the guy that I know really well. And you know, they kind of did it because they noticed the pattern and they weren't really trying to even so much predict things as just seeing, Hey, this is what's happened in the past. So it probably will happen, but it's amazing how things kept getting pushed further and further towards collectivism. All the way through last year. I was like, well, that's really following the book. Well, so I guess we start making the change back, which I hope we are right now. It's hard to tell. We

Ni**arificEnergy:

Fingers, fingers crossed. So I think, I think that for me, it's I look at it also, I do think that that is correct, but I look at it as like masculine versus feminine energy. And so like we are the generation.

Gene:

the same thing.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right. No, I definitely agree with you for sure. But like my timeline is a little bit different. That's why I like because I think that the men who are potentially different because I think that the men who came back from World War Two were all taught by not only harder men, but they were put through boot camp. So they were taught by the hardest of men and trying to be the hardest of men. And so when they came home, I recognize a lot of the generation that they gave birth to the boomers, they started to reject those, the love and will of their father and started to move towards the mom's feminine energy. Because they thought that the discipline from my father was way too much. Yeah. So I think that that's that's what I see, but like also this pendulum. So that's why I want to look, I definitely want to read this book because

Gene:

Yeah,

Ni**arificEnergy:

awesome.

Gene:

it is pretty good. Now when are you going to be back in in Texas? In,

Ni**arificEnergy:

I have a bunch of podcasts that I'm going to be going on and meeting a couple of people on the, in the Twitter sphere, but we probably are going to take our time and. We're doing two trips. So the first time we get there, we'll be in about three weeks.

Gene:

okay.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah. And then we're going to come, come

Gene:

Yeah, and then

Ni**arificEnergy:

back and then go for, go

Gene:

I'm just trying to think I need to look up I'll send you the info, but he's doing a class on that book this year. I don't don't remember when. So I need to check when that classes and then let you know, because that might be a fun way for you to come down here as well. And we could meet up and even do the class together, but

Ni**arificEnergy:

That would be

Gene:

a. It's, it's, Roy is a very cool dude. I got to know him by taking classes from him. I went to, so he, he is the guy who started the wizard Academy and the wizard Academy is a private training facility for really marketing and business stuff and and his, like his favorite, his most famous book is called the wizard of ads. So he's kind of had the wizard thing going for a while,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right.

Gene:

but also the wizard academy is a really fucking cool place. It is a castle in the up in the hills of Austin and it looks very magical. And it's, it's just so I went to one of his classes. This is back a decade ago called magical worlds. And while at that class, I liked the class so much that I literally signed up for every other class that they offered that same day. And I ended up going there for about Oh, it's probably almost two years where I was there like a couple of times a month because they typically will run a class every other week.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Okay.

Gene:

really got to know everybody really well there including Roy and got to really appreciate, you know, his, both his sense of humor and his intelligence. And this guy is a very interesting character. He has been extremely successful over the years as a marketing guy. And he loves collecting art. So the whole place is filled with really cool art. He has the biggest collection of Don Quixote art in the

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, wow.

Gene:

And the, the Don Quixote or no, the Cervantes society Cervantes is the the author of Don Quixote, they actually meet for their. International meetings at the wizard academy.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, okay.

Gene:

So I'll send you

Ni**arificEnergy:

looked him up. I just, I just yeah, that's, that's pretty cool. I I went to school for marketing. So that's like this stuff is I usually ignore all marketing stuff because I've gone to school for marketing and like all a bunch of businesses, but like I always like to see what like how different people view different things. So I'll definitely check

Gene:

Yeah. Well, he, he is a very much a contrarian in everything he teaches and does. So it almost everything starts with, if, if a bunch of people are doing it, here's why you're not going to do it this way. Cause that's wrong.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, I 100 percent agree

Gene:

And then it goes a totally different route. And I know this is starting to sound like an ad for Wizard Academy and for Roy. It's, I wish I was getting paid for it, I'm not. But you know, something that Roy doesn't really mention a whole lot. But Roy's advertising is responsible for roughly one third of the jewelry purchases in the United States.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Boy, advertising. Wait, how is that possible? Say that again?

Gene:

He does the ads for jewelry. So roughly, roughly one third of all the jewelry sold in the United States is purchased by people that have heard his ad. Yeah, and it's it's crazy, crazy levels of holy shit. But you know, he's also. He's the kind of guy that wears you know, jeans a white shirt and drives a pickup truck and and then he might have a million dollar painting in his kitchen.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right. That's pretty cool.

Gene:

Yeah,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Now, how has that helped you do you use that to start the businesses that you said that you, you run?

Gene:

no, I, that's the irony of it is I've never really done marketing. I'm, I, I probably know way more about marketing than most people as a result of doing this. But I don't do marketing professionally, so I've always done business operations. So I'm, I'm a process guy. And you know, the other side of the business other than sales and marketing. But I just really liked the content because a lot of content is, I almost say it's tangential to marketing, but it's really just fricking interesting. You know, with a class like magical worlds, it just looks at the way that humans perceive things.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, yeah.

Gene:

Then he's got another class called portals of the mind. He's got another one that is Da Vinci and the 40 questions or 40 answers. They're all very interesting classes that you could argue have more to do with just human psychology than they do with sales or marketing. But officially the, the school is a school of marketing.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah. So my marketing director basically told me that, he said, this is psychology, but in practice. So this is these people are looking at the world and you have to look at the world in such a way that what, what will get the outcome that you want? And what. Buttons can be pressed. He would always use the phrase verbal jujitsu. So if you're negotiating with someone, you're just doing verbal jujitsu with them in order to get them into doing or saying whatever you want them to do. Different people have different things and ways that they accomplish that. But for the most part, and this is why I don't watch a lot of marketing people, for the most part, it's a lot of the same things. Andy Elliott is really good at convincing people to say yes. But the thing that he's doing is something that I learned a decade ago. But he built a 200 million business on it. You know what I mean? And I didn't do that. So, whatever. But, yeah just getting people to say yes a bunch of times. So a bunch of small things primes them to say yes to the big thing. So as long as you can keep moving things in a certain way you don't, you rarely ever see knockouts in the first 10 seconds of an MMA fight. It's because people have to work through, and it's really just, especially if the guys are very close, it's really about who makes the mistake first when they get tired. Because they're basically going to fight. Perfect when they're not tired,

Gene:

exactly. And so a very good way of looking at it is it's, it's just mistake avoidance. And that is literally what I teach people that I work with that are CEOs and business founders is I, you know, I say that there's nothing magic in, in what I'm going to tell you and what we're going to do. All I'm really doing is. Helping you avoid mistakes that you likely would have made without me.

Ni**arificEnergy:

right? Yeah. Be flood avoided.

Gene:

just by avoiding mistakes. You can be infinitely more successful than other people. Because you're not wasting energy, getting back out of those mistakes. You could just avoid the mistake and keep going forward.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah. Yeah. I totally agree. It's that you said that they're in like prepping stuff like, or like what is, or what are like some of the products are you allowed to say or no?

Gene:

So, oh, you mean the companies that I've, so I ran a company, this would have been back, I guess, uh, four years though, four, yeah, four to five years ago, I came in to do a rework basically on the business and then ran it for while I was doing the rework. And it was called survival life. I don't know if you remember them. They were the biggest mail order company of prepping supplies for a while.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Okay. Wow.

Gene:

and yeah, and then I, I've got my own set of products on the Amazon that are not selling particularly well. So definitely have some issues in that for some other prepping stuff, we're going to be probably retooling the whole idea of how we, how we can go about selling and marketing that stuff. But it, it's a. In the end, all you're trying to do is take products that other people would be interested in buying if they're interested in this topic and just helping them get to that buy decision faster. Because they're like, they, they should be happy with them because if they weren't looking for these to begin with, then I don't want to sell to them. I want to sell to people that need what it is that I'm, that I'm selling. And all I'm trying to do is short circuit that connection to happen quicker. That's all.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Okay. I gotcha.

Gene:

Where a lot of people just want to sell to anybody. And maybe it also, this is why I've been less successful as far as selling products myself, because I don't, I don't want to sell. I only want to sell to people that want. To get the stuff that are sort of ready for it. The, and it's the same thing that I do with whether it was in the Fediverse or on Twitter or X is I, I never meet people. I either don't do anything or block them because if. If there's somebody that is on the opposite side of something that I'm trying to achieve and I don't care if it's politics or it's, you know, business success for something else, if like they're actively working against what I'm working for, I don't want them to have access to what it is that I'm putting out there that I'm creating. And that goes for products as well as language as well as speech. I have no interest in supporting people that are working against me. This is why I don't shop at target. I don't have Disney. I don't have Netflix. I don't buy Goodyear tires. These are all businesses that have demonstrated that they are actively supporting things that are contrary to what I consider to be good and just in the world, and so I will not put any money into these businesses.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Okay, so I have a question for you just to challenge that theory just a little bit right so youtube it costs youtube and youtube Makes almost no money off of this kind of stuff because they're just burning through servers and stuff So one of the reasons why like I have not made the total switch to rumble is because I don't pay Youtube for anything so i'm honestly a drain on youtube but like People would say that Oh, well, you're still watching YouTube. You're putting yourself into that universe where you're just trapped and you're supporting them. But really I'm just costing them more money in my opinion. But what do you think?

Gene:

no, I agree. I'm, I mean, I'm worse than you are in that aspect because I actually pay YouTube every month to not have ads.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh,

Gene:

So they are making money off of me and but here's the thing. I think YouTube is run by a bunch of, you know, borderline socialist assholes. However and I, I incidentally will be super happy to completely jump off YouTube when the time is right. However, I think that between rumble and other alternatives. YouTube has had such a long amount of time to get ahead that the alternatives are still quite a ways from catching up. With YouTube. Now, if YouTube does something completely egregious, I will stop spending money and watching it immediately. But right now, for as much as YouTube has done to de platform people and to do things that I don't agree with, they also still carry a ton of content that I like. And that I agree with and people that I, I, I'm happy to support are also making revenue off of YouTube advertising as well. You know, there's a lot of there are a lot of things that I enjoy that have nothing to do with politics animal videos, right? I like big cats. I watched a number of YouTube channels of people that own. Pumas or tigers or whatever, big

Ni**arificEnergy:

And you're, you and I are like the same person. This is hilarious. Yeah, I totally agree with you. I totally agree with you. Like

Gene:

And, and there, there are people that have gotten a very sizable amount of money for having nonpolitical stuff on YouTube. And I, I hate the idea of them being penalized because of the other stuff that YouTube is doing. And I will. Carry on with those people if and when they leave YouTube, but I'm also going to continue to watch them while they are in on YouTube, but that's also very like YouTube hasn't pulled a Netflix that I've seen like they haven't switched and completely started ruining all content by doing, as Cartman says. But a gay chicken it, you know, like they haven't done that because they're not in the business of creating shows. They're just in the business of really, I mean, kind of policing what everybody else is creating and putting together, which they should do less of in my opinion, but they're not really creating it. Whereas Netflix is actively spending money to create things. That are bad for people bad for children the, for me, it was when, when they had that, that show that was made in, I think, France about the twerking preteens was it called cuties, I think.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yes.

Gene:

And it's really, you're going to, you're going to be promoting full on pedophilia on, on Netflix. Fuck this. And I, I was a customer of Netflix from the first year they were around. I was getting DVDs sent to me in the mail. And it was the coolest thing. I mean, it was like so revolutionary to be able to rent movies through the mail. And yeah, that was it. That was the straw that brought the camel's

Ni**arificEnergy:

The part of me, the part of me that worked at Blockbuster just slide through your middle finger. I don't know if you caught it or not, but but yeah, I, I agree with you. Like Netflix has basically, they fired a lot of their traditional storytellers. They have they've really sort of ruined

Gene:

Well, what happened is they

Ni**arificEnergy:

everything that they touched.

Gene:

create things that they know sell well, and they started creating things that had the political messaging that they wanted. And they didn't care about their customers anymore. They started focusing on just being a, well, I mean, let's be honest, being a full on. Propaganda wing, because that's what propaganda is. It is targeted focus messaging to sell a particular point of view. That's literally what it's been for the last hundred years. And then really propaganda only became defined as a thing about a hundred years ago, and it popped out here in the U S and then it got popularized in early on in the Soviet Union and then in Nazi Germany as well, but it started in the U S. And it, it certainly. Was what, what propelled a lot of the U S messaging. It was Edward Bernays and his his push of creating this, this messaging content that sold a particular point of view. That viewpoint could be, you should buy Lucky Strike cigarettes, or it could be you know, Joe Biden is the greatest president that's ever been because he's managed to keep this country inflation free and out of wars. And really focused on ensuring the border has been great. That's propaganda. It's, it's selling something. It doesn't have to be political. But it certainly could be political.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, no, I definitely agree. There, there has to be a distinction made, and I don't, I agree with you that I don't think that YouTube has crossed the line in that particular spot. I do not like how much they either demonetize or flat out deleted videos of the COVID 19 stuff. Everything has like a tag on it and like,

Gene:

Mm hmm.

Ni**arificEnergy:

it that's really tough for me at the time. My wife was like working and stuff. So we were in Dallas and it got to the point where what you saw it took Ken Paxton joining a lawsuit with, I think it was Tennessee or Florida. In order to stop OSHA from from making it mandated for everybody. So my wife worked at Starbucks at the time and she was pregnant. And at the time, like the outward data was that if you're pregnant and you take the Vax, it is a, not a foregone conclusion, but it is very, very risky that you, and very high potential that you would lose that baby. So it was like, it was really helpful at that time to be in the right place and at the right time. But I also just think that YouTube definitely lost me there. For,

Gene:

Oh, yeah,

Ni**arificEnergy:

yeah, they just are not free speech.

Gene:

it's, it's because it's Google. I mean, let's be realistic. You that, that existed pre Google was a, you know, it was the open wild West or the open ocean pirate scene. You know, it was like, everything goes, nothing's moderated, nothing's restricted. If anything, I probably would have had more complaints of the stuff that was available to be viewed on YouTube back then, back in the day, you know, there was, there was definitely quite a bit of pornographic stuff. There was,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, yeah,

Gene:

enough content pretty readily available and once Google bought them obviously they started cleaning things up, but. Like in a lot of large corporations these days, and I think this is maybe where the pendulum swing has a lot to do with it. There was a strong push to go beyond just cleaning up, but into appropriate content, favored content, content that we want everybody. To have to see whether they want to or not. And I agree with you on the COVID stuff when those little, little messages underneath the video started popping up that says, you know, the, the World Health Organization has determined bloody, bloody, blah. It's well, why are you showing me that? I don't give a shit about the, the World Health Organization. I, I, I know how corrupt they are. Why would I give a shit about what their opinion is? I'm trying to watch a video by an actual. Doctor,

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yes.

Gene:

I don't need a warning about some bureaucrats opinion of, of some topic and that's where they screwed up. But so did Facebook. So did Twitter. So did everybody else.

Ni**arificEnergy:

yeah, for sure. And I know this because I do this for my kids for to a very large degree, you can't get a two and three year old to multiply and divide without doing extraordinary things. But I curate everything for my kids. Yes. For my kids and like the thing that I didn't like is that like I could see exactly how YouTube was curating information for the audience, you know, and that's a really really big thing like you said propaganda, which is basically the same thing as curating it for for people but I think that the left is far better at that particular thing. And reaching their people with their message at that, that it actually is very dangerous. Right.

Gene:

Well, and it makes sense that the left would be better because the left really ideals are built on collectivism and it's, it's one of the key distinctions between the left and the right is the collectivism on the left and individualism on the right. And you know, I, I certainly prefer the libertarian quadrants, so where you have a two dimensional chart instead of just left and right. But if you have to shrink it down to just the left and right issue I think that that's a good distinguishing feature is that the left is worried about the group. The right is worried about the individual.

Ni**arificEnergy:

It doesn't seem that way on the surface. Like I grew up as like a inner city Democrat and like what it seems like on the surface that I try to keep reminding people of is that it seems like Democrats are trying to help the average person,

Gene:

Mm hmm.

Ni**arificEnergy:

these people are convinced by Oh, well, they signed this bill or they evoke this action or something, they never look at the actual results of those things. And it's it's, it's mind boggling like Democrats have been in control of Chicago for over 140 years.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah.

Ni**arificEnergy:

You would, you would think that it's, and have had several black mayors, several black police chiefs. A ton of black officers. So like, why is it not getting fixed? And it's because the people live under a delusion. It's almost like a genjutsu that these people are under, to quote a Naruto thing. I don't know if you watch anime.

Gene:

Occasionally. Occasionally.

Ni**arificEnergy:

people will get the, get the reference. But it's like the they they're just blinded by I need this thing. And then a snake oil salesman will just simply tell them that if you vote for me, I will give you that thing. And the only thing I'm reminding them of is like all the things that they said to me about what Trump was supposed to do, which they were very, very scared of because they got scared of the idea of Trump because media just does what media does. But like they can't point to the actual things. And it, during the election last time, it was very frustrating because you're trying to talk to people who simply do not want to read or think differently at all. You ask, they will tell you straight up. I, I got into, I try to be very nice with people and just try to tell them Okay, this is the history of Kamala Harris. You're telling me that you don't like police. Right? Fine. You don't like police, you don't like that they lock up Black people for no reason. Fine. Here's this interview with this guy, and he got locked up by this person, and guess what? It's Kamala Harris. And they just they

Gene:

Yeah, she was the one that was mostly in locking people up during her

Ni**arificEnergy:

oh yeah. 100%. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And she was toeing the line to try to Be a hard nosed person like she was extraordinarily ruthless and in her cases, but like you, you have them read that and you have them listen to those accounts and it's like they just get angry at you. Just like, why are you

Gene:

because, yeah, because it's hurting their amygdala, you know, it's people, people's reaction to seeing contrary history is very much anger because it means that either you're lying to them right now, or. If they can't make that argument that they've been lied to in the past, and that's a very, very negative emotion. So they're going to lash out and say, well, no, you're wrong. It's not the way it actually is. But Chicago is a great example because if you look at that city, the problems that it has, the problems it's had historically, it's been completely 100 percent up to the Democrats to solve these for a hundred years. And it's only gotten worse.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, all of their plans. All, they've all failed.

Gene:

Chicago. Yeah. And I, you know, back in like the early nineties or even late nineties, I used to go to Chicago pretty regularly. Because I liked the city, it was, it was a cool city. It was clubs were open until 6. 00 AM and you can go partying all night long. It was a good time. And um, you know, it was one of those things where now talking to people that live there, including Darren, who I do unrelenting podcasts with They're like, oh yeah, you, you can't be there at night now you get killed. Like what I used to walk there all the time. You it's it's ironic, but I, I always used to stay in the same hotel, which is right on Wacker drive. I guess Wacker has different meaning now than it used to. But yeah, it was like I, I, I saw the Tribune building out of my windows in the hotel every time I was there, it was just a gorgeous city and a city with a lot of, a lot of history. That reinvented itself after the big fire and it seems like it's just constantly been at battle with itself and that's very sad.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, it's it's so extraordinary how people can just gloss over reality. In, in exchange for like their own they don't even care about the actual truth. They just want their thing to happen punitively, almost, you know, so bizarre, but like human beings are very strange. They don't care about doing the right thing at all. I'm absolutely convinced that we're, we're in a Petri dish and somebody created us to see how long we'd last.

Gene:

Well, and I, this is where I also really think there's a lot of, a lot of truth to separating the people out there into NPCs. And actual humans, actual, you know, sentient characters, because there, there does seem to be a huge number of people that are acting very predictably. They're going through the motions. They're they're not really able to think. Outside of their base programming, they're just following whatever path they were started on and never deviating from it. And it's bizarre to me, because to me, it's well, that that's totally an NPC. You're just following a script. You're not actually living a life. You're not thinking for yourself. You're not taking data in and then making appropriate value judgments on how to act in the future. You're literally following a script that somebody else wrote.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, no, I totally agree. And here's the thing that's funny, right? So my, my mother in law and father in law are these people, right? So I asked them, my mother in law's a teacher, so I asked her like, okay, well, like, how are the kids at your school? And she's oh, I hate them. None of them think, maybe about 10 percent of them can do critical thinking. They're all disrespectful. And I just say, oh, okay, so You don't like the youth of the people who you are, who are in your area. What, what do they vote like? What, what do they do on Sunday morning? You know? Are they going, are they churchgoers? Are they people who are giving their kids ultimate discipline? Are they people who do you think that this same thing is happening in, in Catholic churches or private schools? It's not, it's definitely not. So they don't even understand that it's their whole culture that's creating the badness that they see. They just see that it's badness around them.

Gene:

Yeah.

Ni**arificEnergy:

All the people who you just named, she's like constantly complaining about Republicans. And then, then she complained the other day, she says something about a doctor. So he's like complaining about this doctor wasting her time and all this other, like that guy votes the same way you do and you're angry at him. And I don't understand your world. Like you, you don't like the culture that you are creating and giving to the world. Another thing is Patrick, but David, he had this tweet. It said 1 percent of the population controls the world. 4 percent of the population are they're puppets, 90, 90 percent of the population are just zombies. Like you were talking about it's just 5 percent are trying to wake up the zombies, you know? And, and

Gene:

It's probably very true historically as well, because if you look at major events that have happened, like 4 percent participation rate. I mean, it means 96 percent and Ben could correct me on this when he listens, but 96 percent of people of the British, you know, they were all British subjects living in America at the time of the American revolution. They were kind of agnostic or, you know, they like, whatever, I guess there's something going on. I don't know. Like they weren't on board with the revolution, but neither were they on board with helping the British either. They were just doing their thing. They were NPCs.

Ni**arificEnergy:

It takes a small number of people to flip, ultimately flip a population. Like it really only takes,

Gene:

Same thing with the Russian Revolution, you know, the Russian Empire, a very similar thing there. The, I don't know the exact percentage but I do know that the revolution itself, which happened in Russia, was not a Soviet revolution. It was actually a you know, it was basically the anti Tsar People's revolution, right? There was a number of different factions that all kind of joined together in in the name of the peasants to overthrow that's our, but they also. Weren't communists, the communists were a small faction within that group. And then the communists just kind of took over and the communists absolutely represented at the time of the the, I guess, adoption or the, the revolution becoming a communist revolution, which was. About a year later, after the, the first revolution that took the Tsar out at that time, the communist party represented probably less than 1 percent of the population, but they were able to take advantage of the recent change within governance and political movements. And they had the rhetoric, which was, you know, now all the peasants will own the factories and own the land that you've been farming all these years for somebody else. Now it all belongs to you. And so they were able to get in power, get in charge, and then quickly prevent anybody else from doing likewise. And that's, that's a big distinction, as I think in the U. S. we've grown accustomed to just saying, yeah, communist China, communist Russia, these are bad. Well, they're certainly not good, but the communist part, A, is not true. Neither one's been true communist ever. And B, that's not the really bad part of these countries governance. The really bad part is is that, that they're authoritarian. And you can have authoritarian capitalist governments for example you have in Iran. Iran is not a socialist or communist country. It is absolutely authoritarian. Same thing, Saudi Arabia, we can argue about how good or bad the Saudi government is, but, but it's, it's a, maybe a softer, nicer looking version, but it is absolutely no different than the government in Iran in terms of its authoritarian you know, 100 percent control of do, as I say if they do take somebody out, they'll take somebody out.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah. The United Arab Emirates is the same way. I mean, down to the point where they, I mean, they control immigration to the point where you're not allowed to just move there. You have to have a certain net wealth to move there. You have to have a certain apartment. I mean, apartments there are crazy, crazy expensive.

Gene:

I don't know that they're wrong about. I think they might be answer something very good in that doubt. It's say you wanna move, you gotta have the means to do so. Mm-Hmm.

Ni**arificEnergy:

that's like a tough thing because then liberals will have sort of a utopia to point to, to say, look, look at here, this dangerous freedom stuff won't work. Here's a picture of this. This actually works. And, and that's the thing that's tough being on different ends of the spectrum. A bunch of my friends, I'm gonna, I'm gonna name you my friend T Pain. I love you. I love you, brother. But he's constantly talking to me and everyone makes this argument about I love you. How voting doesn't work. So if voting doesn't work, why are people trying so hard? Democrats are like flooding the country with people so that they can ensure themselves a majority forever. Like, why are they even doing that if voting doesn't work? Like, why would they cheat in the last election if it didn't work? We had people bussing in boxes and boxes of votes, you know? So, to a certain degree, I agree with them that being in a Democracy or a republic. And if you're a fringe minority, you're the 1 percent trying to wake up the 90 percent or the 5 percent trying to wake up the 90%. It can seem like the game is rigged, but history shows, like you just said, it's a small minority that always flips the vast majority. And the only thing we need to do is just keep plugging away at it.

Gene:

I think we're on the verge of seeing in real time a replay of the French Revolution in France. Like they are very, very close to literally pulling out the guillotines and chopping heads off of politicians right now.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, yeah,

Gene:

It is

Ni**arificEnergy:

entirely possible that 2024 we have Two presidents, because half the country will not accept that Joe Biden cheated. And they will not like, and they've already challenged this before Texas challenged the end of Supreme court, denied it, unfortunately. The, the constitutional right that, that Phil, not

Gene:

is, is a bunch of pussies and anything to do with being in the middle of a political struggle there, you know, you think about it, you're there for life. Like the last thing you need is to have a bunch of people pissed off at you.

Ni**arificEnergy:

oh

Gene:

just choose to do nothing.

Ni**arificEnergy:

well they do now because they just, I think they just ruled nine Oh, for Trump, keeping Trump on the ballot, I think.

Gene:

I thought it was a one.

Ni**arificEnergy:

I keep seeing nine. Oh,

Gene:

thought, I thought one of them voted against

Ni**arificEnergy:

an ex

Gene:

But either way, I mean, that's because there was no good argument for it. There's no historical basis for doing that. But there's an awful lot of cases that they just sort of don't take up that have they taken up would have put a decision in place once and for all. And I'm specifically referring to a bunch of Second Amendment related cases. Because we, we have. And I know I'm changing topic a little bit here, but we, we have in place a bureaucracy and organization that should not exist because it's extra constitutional and that is ATF. And we have restrictions on our gun rights that came out of the the was it the firearms, something act. I can't remember off the top of my head again. I suck with memorizing stuff, people. So you, y'all are familiar with that, but it's, it's the original firearms control act from 19, was it 19? It's a thirties or forties point being. Like that, the, yeah, the National Firearms Act, it should have never passed because there is no power that the federal government has to be able to selectively control some weapons over other weapons being available to Americans. It just doesn't exist. And it was passed because of the really, honestly, emotional. Circumstance of the the gangsters being better armed than the police. Like it was a backlash move in the same way that abolition that, that the, you can't buy alcohol anymore. Was a backlash against men getting drunk after work before they come home that that's all it was. It was an emotionally passed amendment to the Constitution based on something that was real that was happening, but it was literally treating. Not the disease that was treating a symptom of the disease, which is why did men not want to come home? Why would they rather go and hang out with the guys at a bar? Maybe that's something we should look at instead of looking at, well, you got to force people to change their behavior by forbidding things that they enjoy doing. It's a, you know, it's like, why do we not have marijuana being fully legalized right now? Because Hearst didn't want the competition. It's So we ended up in a situation where something that's been available on and around forever and was considered so minor as to not actually warrant any kind of regulation, all of a sudden, because Hearst. Liked his newspapers printed on wood pulp instead of cheaper hemp pulp what's the best way to get hemp out of the competition with wood? Turn it into a controlled substance.

Ni**arificEnergy:

right.

Gene:

that started in California. So it's, it's one of those things of, I guess, to some extent, unintended consequences, but they're not really unintended. They're sort of like, like, we can kill two birds with one stone and one of them may be good. The other one is just something we want. It doesn't matter if it's good or bad. And that's, that's been politics, not just in this country and other countries. I think the real secret that the politicians hold is what we're seeing unraveling in Europe right now. Which is, all you gotta do is get About 5 percent of the population, give or take, so pissed off that they no longer care about being in prison. They don't care about being arrested. They don't care if what they're doing is breaking some local ordinance that some bureaucrat put out there. What they care about is the fact that you're now going in the wrong direction as a country, and they're willing to Stand up for it and to risk their freedoms, their liberty and their lives in the process. And it doesn't take that high a percentage. It's literally 5 to 6 percent of the population is enough to do it.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah. No, I agree. I, I, I do think that my friends definitely missed the mark on, on how powerful we can be if we just banded together a bit. Yeah, for sure.

Gene:

yeah, and that's something that, you know, I was on the border last weekend.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh, yeah. How was that?

Gene:

Pass. So, I mean, I had a lot of number of comments. I posted some videos on X about it. But if I had to kind of summarize. Relating to what we're talking about, I would say the word is disappointing. Disappointing because there was such a small number of people that care about what's going on the border, that all you had to do was take time out of one weekend. To drive down there and just show solidarity with other people that have a strong belief that the border crisis is being mishandled completely. And in the end, you know, there was probably somewhere around 300 people there. It's not a tiny number, but it's way smaller than it should have been. It's way smaller than what I was expecting it to be. And then you know, because it was such a small number, the local police down Eagle Pass basically just closed off a two block area anywhere near the border and just said, yep, Sheriff's off or the, the, the police chief said it's all closed off. You can't be here. And, you know, they can do that when there's 300 people, they couldn't do that. It was, there was 10, 000 people there.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Ah, so the coverage is not as big, like the, the blockade, you're saying?

Gene:

Well, I'm, I'm saying that the police powers are at the mercy of the number of people. That want to do something, you know, the, the, the point at which the police, the, the, the police being the guy on the ground, not the bureaucrat politician. We'll simply look at a crowd and say nope, I'm going home. You saw that in a lot of the BLM events that were happening a few years ago, the police see the crowd coming down and they get the hell out of there. They're no longer responsible for anybody there normally would be responsible for protecting. They're just looking out for themselves. And that number. You know, it's not a fixed number. It's always going to be a percentage of the population, but certainly during the BLM riots, we saw those numbers get hit with some regularity on the Western states and some of the states in the Midwest too. But but we were not seeing anywhere near that level with the, what is ultimately a much bigger deal for our country, which is the lack of borders. You know, it's not good. Let's just assume that everything that the media said about what's his face says again, sort of the uh, uh, the guy that got killed there. Yeah.

Ni**arificEnergy:

What is his name? George Floyd.

Gene:

Yeah. So let's assume everything the media said is correct. So without even arguing the details about it if that happened, it's, it's obviously bad when you have. Police overstepping their powers, acting unprofessionally, and somebody ends up dying as a result of that, right? However, that is a hit and that is a drop in the bucket compared to the danger and the negative effects that the whole country right now is facing with a lack of a controlled border. There are over 10, 000 undocumented people who are mostly men, mostly in their 20s. And mostly coming without families that are crossing the border

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right.

Gene:

and it's mostly not Mexican. If you look at a

Ni**arificEnergy:

I heard on, I agree with you, like it's a, a lot of Chinese people, a

Gene:

lot of Chinese,

Ni**arificEnergy:

escaping,

Gene:

a lot of people from Africa, a lot of people from South America. But the number of of people coming in with literally no English at all. It's huge. What are these people here for? What are you going to do? You know, what's the plan than they're going to vote Democrat? Other than that, what is the plan?

Ni**arificEnergy:

yes, see, I think I agree with you that the 300 number is honestly, really sad because. I heard Byron Donaldson, I forget what podcast he was on, I think Tim Cass, but he said if one person calls my office, I will never hear about it. If a hundred people call my office, then maybe one or two staff members will hear about it. If a thousand people call my office, Then everybody knows about it. So like for them to have, and I know that immigration is like issue that's been in the sixties and 70

Gene:

hmm.

Ni**arificEnergy:

where America thinks it's polled as a really big issue. But it's it's it's a really tough thing. If 300 people actually physically show up, you know, that's not even moving the needle. Like it

Gene:

it's literally one 30 or yeah, one 30th of the number of people crossing the border.

Ni**arificEnergy:

right.

Gene:

Yeah.

Ni**arificEnergy:

And I get people are

Gene:

say, I'd say the, the average age of people at the event was probably 60.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Okay. So here's another thing that I, I, I, I want to challenge you on because I think that it may help. Right. So, not saying that you're old, but you're a little bit older in that generation of people who like have built businesses and are successful. Right. From the democratic side, there is a functional machine where even Kamala Harris is right. Paying for people to get out of prison,

Gene:

Yeah.

Ni**arificEnergy:

if they do the correct things, or yell at the right people. There is almost no million, like George Soros, people are yelling about George Soros. Well, he's spending his money in a free capitalist society. So like, why are you mad at him for that? You're mad at something completely different. There are no billionaires on our side, or no people who are helping our people

Gene:

Well, there wasn't, I mean, Musk is doing that now.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Right. No, I agree with you. But even him and somebody Mike said this earlier, I think I'm not, I'm going to butcher it, but I'm going to give you the gist of it. But he was saying that must will terminate people or devalue people as soon as he disagrees with them. And as soon as cat turds started to disagree with him about stuff, he flogged his account. So it's I don't necessarily,

Gene:

Yeah. I, I don't

Ni**arificEnergy:

do think that he, I do think that he has made the right choices at every point. He is a person who seems to think about his choices very deeply, which I definitely appreciate, but I also think that he's just an individual and it should be run by, it should be run more by an entity that is not so subjective to that. He's doing that a little bit with community notes. And community

Gene:

Notes is definitely a good feature. I like that.

Ni**arificEnergy:

yeah, it has to have agreement from three parties, which is great. It's you have to be left, right and center for that to get posted. So

Gene:

I do think that that he has to be able to run it like a private company because meaning, you know, he can decide to overrule himself and others if he wants to. Because the. The people that prefer collectivism are much better at taking advantage of any, any sort of. Organize because again, if you look at it from that difference of perspective of, of of individualism versus collectivism, as soon as you have a group in charge, instead of a person, that group becomes susceptible. To group control, which the left is much better at doing. This is something they had more experience in and they enjoy doing more because the right generally just wants to be left the hell alone. And, and so I think he does have to run it the way he is. And if he like I said earlier. I, I will block people because if they do something that, that is in my view, actively working against something that I believe in something that I'm promoting, I don't want them to have the benefit of even seeing what the hell I'm saying. I don't, I don't believe in that all publicity is good publicity stuff, because ultimately my messaging is for people that have a brain and can understand what I'm saying. It's not there to be turned into memes for people that just want to make fun of shit.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, no, I totally agree. I think that that's where people get religion wrong. Where it's a, they tried to mend.

Gene:

Mm

Ni**arificEnergy:

Reality to their like they change God into whatever they want God to be instead of Okay, no, this is the word, and you need to just follow that. Not I'm not like an overly religious person, but I've studied it a lot. But I think that that's definitely one of the biggest pitfalls that people have with religion, for sure. They're trying to mend something into something that it's not. Where it's

Gene:

Well, and, and

Ni**arificEnergy:

everybody. Being a Christian is not for everybody. Being a Muslim is not for everybody. Not everybody can handle that discipline.

Gene:

denominations within both of those. But what kind of Muslim? What kind of Christian? You know? And, well,

Ni**arificEnergy:

where that came from, I think.

Gene:

I don't know if the movie is going to be good at all or if it's going to suck, but like in the ad for that movie about the American revolution, the new revolution at the very end of the teaser, you know, the guys holding up the main characters and they say, Hey, we're American. And he looks at me and goes, yeah, but. What kind of Americans are you?

Ni**arificEnergy:

right.

Gene:

And I think that's a valid question. I think it is, we're at the point right now where saying you're American is not, it's too broad. It doesn't give enough details. It used to mean something more concise and more homogenous than it does today. Because today, everybody from people that are left of left of Lenin And to the right of the Nazis, like everybody, all those people are claiming Americanism. So I think that it is a valid question. Well, what kind of American are you?

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, I, I think that it's it, I think that it started with the left. They, they tend to demonize figureheads on the other side to tell their story, whereas again, like the, and I only know this because I came from the left. Most people on the right who I know and are really good friends with. I will tell them about subtleties of changing language and curtailing language. And they're just like, I have no idea what the hell you're talking about, but leave me alone. And then it's in a few years, it was like, oh, okay, well, now they're turning everybody, girls or boys, down. they're like, Oh, okay. Now I get it.

Gene:

Yeah, exactly.

Ni**arificEnergy:

So it's just it's so weird. It's like you said, like conservatives just basically want to be left the hell alone. But at the same time, they're being just like scratched in, in, in ways they don't even see. Um, uh, George Carlin talked about soft language. Like that, this started, he recognized that in the seventies, like changing people, changing language back then. And now it's just like completely unfurled into something that we almost, it's unrecognizable, you know?

Gene:

Yeah. I think that's very true. I think that there's subtleties like for most of my life, the dictionary definition of the difference between sex and gender. Is that sex is a property of human beings. Gender is a property of words. Because a lot of languages, not English, but a lot of other languages, Spanish, Russian, you know, you name it, they have words of different gender. And so the word gender in and of itself only referred to the gender of words and that gender coincides with sexual names. It's masculine, feminine, or, or neutral. But, but it was never meant as referencing an actual human being. It was just referencing words that were masculine or feminine. And by taking that word, and this is something that left down a lot of things. I think they've taken a lot of words out of context, changed the meaning of those words by constantly using them effectively, wrongly using them in the wrong definition. And, but by doing that long enough and long enough could be as short as a couple of years, You know, two to five years, then boom, the word has a new definition in the dictionary because that's all it takes because the dictionaries are living. They're meant to be updated with current usage. And so if you start misusing the definition of a word for long enough and you get enough people to subscribe to that new definition, you get to magically change the meaning of a word. And that's what's happened with the word gender.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Oh yeah. I think gender started in like the 1950s or something like that. That's when the word first popped up and like toxic masculinity was designed for looking at. Hyper masculine men in prison systems who would react very violently when confronted with the smallest things. And then now that all of a sudden unfurled itself

Gene:

and incidentally, that has a racist component to it because the man that it was generally looking at were responses. things that the prison guards thought were very minor, like calling men certain words. And all of a sudden that resulted in a very strong negative reaction. Go, go figure.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yo, figure.

Gene:

So, yeah, you, you have the misuse of the now, as far as they're concerned, everybody born with a penis is toxic.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah. No, I know people who they, luckily everything is, like, all right now. They've come out of it, and I've seen it several times online as well. Where like people just didn't want they bought the narrative of I don't want to be toxic masculine or toxic feminine or whatever but luckily they've like sort of gotten out of that a little bit. And Yeah, but it's so it's such a strange thing, man. Like I don't, I don't understand human beings from from that perspective. I just understand how they, how they are. And I know that there are just dark forces that that are just, just out there. I don't know if you saw the story. They came out with the people were trying to, they were seeding straight people's porn with gay porn in order to try to turn them gay.

Gene:

Yeah, I heard about that. Let's just pretend I've never actually seen that. But yeah, yeah, that's, that's,

Ni**arificEnergy:

pretend I've never seen that either,

Gene:

yeah,

Ni**arificEnergy:

but let's say that I have a friend

Gene:

say that it, maybe your friends saw that happening. Yeah, exactly.

Ni**arificEnergy:

like it, like

Gene:

think, I think it's

Ni**arificEnergy:

it even happened, like before it became a story, I was like,

Gene:

but

Ni**arificEnergy:

me, but my friend was noticing

Gene:

right, right. Not your friend with another thing. Yeah. I have to wonder though, how much of it is by design of some giant conspiracy and how much of it is just people that create non straight porn, wanting a bigger audience and just labeling their own shit as straight.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Okay. So the algorithms are really only going to push you in deeper into the things that you like.

Gene:

Yeah. Theoretically.

Ni**arificEnergy:

yeah. But it was like left field stuff.

Gene:

Yeah. I'll tell you the one that I noticed and I, I've probably seen some of this one as well, but what I've really noticed happening is back about, I'm going to say about five years ago. The front page of these alleged porn sites that I have no knowledge of personally started going from just sort of. You know, hot girls with guys, it started to all of a sudden have a lot of titles like stepmother with son, stepfather with daughter, brother with not real sister.

Ni**arificEnergy:

yep,

Gene:

And this happened, I know we can get the exact time because it was happening right about the time that Game of Thrones was very popular. And of course you have Jamie and Cersei being brother and sister and also, you know, having a lot of

Ni**arificEnergy:

right?

Gene:

And, and all of a sudden this like somehow magically transported into the, the porn sites. Pushing that messaging for videos. Now the videos themselves may not even been all that different from what they would have been two or three years ago, but the, the messaging, the titles and the way that the people refer to each other, all of a sudden became very incestuous, literally incestuous. Did you notice that? Or had you had any friends report noticing that?

Ni**arificEnergy:

No, I totally agree. I totally, totally agree with you. It's It's wild that the deviancy has become, and this is what I was saying a little bit earlier, like there's no one putting the cork back on the bottle, you know, things are only getting crazier, you know?

Gene:

Yeah, it's, it's a one way street. It's a one way road. And again, unfortunately, I think it's a sign of. Times being too good and not enough bad times stuff happening that people can indulge in more deviant behavior. And I, I'm not even making a, like any kind of moralistic judgment against deviant behavior. I'm just saying that this is what happened in Rome toward the twilight of the Roman empire as well. Is they went away from simply going around and conquering other nations to having more crazy wild orgy parties. Dionysus was becoming a lot more popular, you know, than than Mars was, who was really a lot more popular in the earlier years of the empire. So I think we're just seeing a lot of that with the United States.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Yeah, no, I, I totally agree. Like it's, it's really just like the fog of the end of an empire and like the transition periods are always really, really weird.

Gene:

Exactly. Hey, so,

Ni**arificEnergy:

need like a war or something.

Gene:

yeah, I, I, I hate having to even think

Ni**arificEnergy:

Admit that. Right.

Gene:

but there is something to saying it for sure. Now, I believe it or not, we've been going for over 2 hours now, so we got to wrap up this thing, but I will say there's 1 other topic that we didn't get to this time. So we're definitely going to have to do another recording. And that is I want to talk about. More of the, I guess, the similarities and differences that you're seeing and that I'm seeing from the black versus white perspective on what's going on, because I've always said I have way more in common with a black dude than I do with, you know, my ex wife it's, like guys are pretty straightforward to figure out. I don't care if you're Asian or black or white or anything else. As I found out when I did my DNA test, I have one quarter of a percent Samoan. So I'm claiming that I'm fucking this

Ni**arificEnergy:

wow.

Gene:

I mean, I'm like, fuck. Yeah. Get out of my

Ni**arificEnergy:

you go. That's huge.

Gene:

Yeah. I will. Hey, that's more than Elizabeth Warren.

Ni**arificEnergy:

right? We're

Gene:

That's

Ni**arificEnergy:

both minorities, man. All we just have to

Gene:

I'm biracial at this point as far as I'm concerned. So

Ni**arificEnergy:

As long as we all band together like the left does and just keep saying that you're biracial, you actually

Gene:

exactly, exactly.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Rachel Dolezal,

Gene:

All right, well, we'll wrap this one up and we'll definitely do another one with a little more focused topic on commonalities and differences in the future.

Ni**arificEnergy:

Awesome. Thanks. I'm looking forward to it, brother.