Sir Gene Speaks

0092 Sir Gene Speaks with Another Dude Named Kok

November 15, 2022 Gene Naftulyev Season 2022 Episode 92
Sir Gene Speaks
0092 Sir Gene Speaks with Another Dude Named Kok
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Gene:

And this is why immortality sucks joining me today is a dude named Ben. Oh shit. His name isn't Ben Godammit. I, I kept trying to get you to change your name, but you wouldn't quite do it. So what is your preferred name these days?

GWFF:

You can call me a dude named Cock.

Gene:

A dude named Cock. Well that's about a as good as a Ben, I suppose. That's British for Ben.

GWFF:

It's British for the King of Kent

Gene:

Ah. Okay. All right.

GWFF:

Yes, I am. Go the cock on. Well, Griff on gender, social, gw, f and just, yeah, go the cock if you wanna extend it

Gene:

See, I always thought you were playing a dog character with that go thing.

GWFF:

Yeah. A lot of people do.

Gene:

Yeah. So what, what is the go thing? Explain that before we get going

GWFF:

It's very simple. So, when I first saw Adam Curry and I, I saw his, he signed off his emails with ac. I thought, well, there's a neat way of just tightening up someone's name and, and I've had this awfully long name all my life of these four seven letter names, Gregory William Forsyth Foreman, which is a right mouthful, even for a British person to say

Gene:

Is there a dash in there? You, you

GWFF:

Yeah, hyphenated.

Gene:

Yeah, yeah,

GWFF:

the end there. And dad didn't get married before they had me. So technically that makes me a bastard. Which I've, I've struggled with for a long.

Gene:

but I thought all the like all the really rich British people all had hyphenated names.

GWFF:

It does make me sound a lot posture than I actually am. I will give you that

Gene:

mm-hmm. Well, when you had the cock in there, I mean, that's like next level posh.

GWFF:

Yeah. Yeah, it is. Yeah. Very well Cock King of Ken. I mean, that's self-appointed, so it's not like it's a title that has been bestowed upon me. Not yet. Anyway.

Gene:

Right.

GWFF:

Gotta have dreams in. Yeah, gotta have ambitions. Destiny is a calling for all of us, isn't it?

Gene:

and, and why can't,

GWFF:

That's where I'm from. And what happened was, is I was born in a part of Kent, Northwest Kent that was stolen by this, the, the great city of London in 1964.

Gene:

mm-hmm.

GWFF:

And it is now the London Borough of, and I, and I everyone who lives here, who's old enough to remember that it was Kent at some point, still calls it Kent. And I'm just a, I'm a, I'm a bit annoyed about that. I'm a bit miffed,

Gene:

Do they call it old Kent or just Kent?

GWFF:

No, there's no year old in there. No. So BA I've got, I run pubs, I've got pubs, micro pubs, and I had a customer who had a daughter in a hospital in the same hospital I was born in in 1963. And on her birth certificate says that she was born in Kent. And then a year later he had a son who was born in the same bed, in the same hospital. And his birth certificate says London.

Gene:

Hmm.

GWFF:

That's not cool, man. Come on. Now imagine if you were in Tejas and then what's the one north of Tejas? I dunno the, The state? Yeah. If they just turned up and went, Oh, we're having a bit of that bit, you

Gene:

Well, I mean, there were certainly Mexicans that were born here that, a few years after the Texas independence, people born here became born in Texas instead of Mexico.

GWFF:

Well, I mean that done in my favor in the long run though, didn't it?

Gene:

Wow. I mean, they all end up here eventually anyway,

GWFF:

Yeah, it's funny that, isn't it how you get like mass migration to the USA and you also get to the UK at the same time?

Gene:

Different places though. I.

GWFF:

Yeah, yeah. I mean, I've always been enamored with the facts that you guys have. Canada, and to me Canada for you feels very much like Scotland is to us.

Gene:

Oh, I think you're right. I, yeah. Even, even having Nova Scotia up in Canada, just to remind us Oh yeah. It really is in New Scotland.

GWFF:

Yeah, It is, isn't it? Isn't it? But they're it's a bit Frenchy as well, isn't it? So there's

Gene:

Yeah. Well Quebec certainly tries to be, Yes.

GWFF:

Yeah, I've, I've got a a URL that's registered in pm which is the San Pierre, and I can't remember the last one. It's a tiny little island in northwest Scandinavia. It's its own place. It's its own thing. I'm reliably informed. It's where a lot of old school booze was run into to get into America, from Europe and yeah, as a, You

Gene:

I think that's correct.

GWFF:

Ever seen the show? Peaky Blinders?

Gene:

I have not, no.

GWFF:

Okay, Well, I don't, it's not, not worth, not worth your time I have to say, but just in case you had but here's, it's about bi gangsters from Birmingham and and one of them as a, as a thing with the Americans that goes through there. But yeah, it's the world is a, is a very varied place, isn't it? Now, let's face it.

Gene:

I guess, Sure, Yeah, you could say that.

GWFF:

Everyone's trying to tell everyone else what to do, aren't they?

Gene:

are your, are your pubs in Kent or in other places?

GWFF:

Well they're technically, they're in that London borough of Bromley. But if it was, I always say to people, it depends whether you're trying to buy a house or sell a house. Cause if you're trying to sell a house, then you, you'd say it's in Kent. And if you're buying a house, you say, That house is in London. I'm not paying that much for it.

Gene:

So is, was all of Brumley part of Kent?

GWFF:

Yeah. Yeah. It all was,

Gene:

That's a big chunk,

GWFF:

they did the, they built a, a ring road, the M 25, and then they just said everything inside this road of hate, this, this sort of

Gene:

Right.

GWFF:

Yeah. Miles and miles of tarmac that would form this ring of hate around this, the capital

Gene:

Yeah. So I bet the people living in Bromley have just been getting pummeled by the Londoners.

GWFF:

Yeah, I mean, a lot, a lot of people that live around here migrated out from southeast London, Biman z Lamber places south of the river. When they saw it was going a bit south in the in the late sixties and early seventies and eighties, you had a hell

Gene:

But, but it's a whole different culture up there.

GWFF:

Yeah, they, I mean, they bring a

Gene:

I mean, it's the same language, but kind of, sort of.

GWFF:

But they all speak a bit like that, don't they?

Gene:

Right, right. So, I mean, I can't imagine that for the, for the people in Southeastern newly called London, really, they're people from Kent with Kent Traditions and the Kent language that they're probably have been struggling and maybe, asking Kent for some help to help bring them back into the fold of the mother.

GWFF:

I think this is why you, you're big dude. The divine inspiration of the universe has given me the impetus to take on the Monica Cock and and, and run with it. Really, that's, that's all I can kind of dean from the situation. I don't see anyone else trying it. Let's put it that way. And also you can call it k it can't you, which sounds really cool.

Gene:

catch it.

GWFF:

Yeah. Getting Kent Outta Britain.

Gene:

Yeah, I think that's, that's brilliant actually. That's

GWFF:

it's a workable scenario cuz like, if you think about it, we can then have our deal with those pesky Europeans that kind of undoes the Brexit nonsense. And then we can have our deal with the pesky

Gene:

Well, chant does have a road going directly to France.

GWFF:

The tunnel.

Gene:

Well, but it's a road inside a tunnel, right?

GWFF:

Yeah, the channel tunnel.

Gene:

Yeah. I mean, it's not a road. It's not on a bridge, but it is. So certainly there is something to be said for that.

GWFF:

Yeah, I've been on that channel tunnel. It's terrible. Yeah. A couple

Gene:

the channel?

GWFF:

The channel never

Gene:

Never. Never gone in there. No claustrophobic.

GWFF:

Oh yeah. I quite like small spaces.

Gene:

do you? Yeah.

GWFF:

If I was ever buried alive, I think I'd be right.

Gene:

You'd appreciate being in the coffin,

GWFF:

Bit peace and quiet.

Gene:

which, Yeah, you don't have that with London. Then you're breathing down your neck right now.

GWFF:

Two kids and two pubs. It's never gonna happen, is it? Let's face it,

Gene:

Which do you prefer?

GWFF:

the kids well toss up, but the kids

Gene:

Less noise on the kids.

GWFF:

Bit of both. Get outta both in your life. And I'm a social guy. I've always, I've been love to chat, always have done.

Gene:

Well it's probably a good idea then to, if you have pubs, to be a social guy.

GWFF:

Oh yeah, you've got to, it's, It's one of those things, It's like if you're gonna be a nurse, then you should have, you should

Gene:

So.

GWFF:

to care for people. And if you wanna be

Gene:

Interesting. Interesting thing about you is you're somewhat unique in the no agenda audience because you don't work in it.

GWFF:

Yeah.

Gene:

So I think there's three of you, so you're not quite unique, but close to unique. So, So how the hell did you end up listening to No Agenda and Adam Curry if you don't work in it?

GWFF:

Well, I so I was an actor for 20 years or so from a kid up to about 26. And then when my misses got pregnant with our first I decided to stop acting and do something else. I thought at the time my dream was to be to form my own electricians business. So I was an electrician's apprentice quite late on in life. I wanted to do this a business that, that sort of that was that sort of safe proofed homes against wifi signals and 5g before 5G was a thing. I thought that it, that'd be a really good idea to use. All gone and ized crystals and just clean the energies in houses and stuff. I, I know are quite a lot of. Celebrities and, and people that pay a lot of money for massive crystals that have attached to some sort of power

Gene:

Oh, yes. They're a great, a great demographic for selling crystals too.

GWFF:

Oh yeah. Especially the reality stars. Yeah. I know a guy that paid 38,000 pounds for a, for a big old piece of quartz that had a light in it. Effectively.

Gene:

Nice.

GWFF:

Yeah.

Gene:

somebody's gotta make a living selling those things to

GWFF:

Yeah, so,

Gene:

pretend to be others.

GWFF:

So I had my hand down a wool trying to find a, a cable that someone else is poking up from the floor below. And I was listening to a show that I'd listened to for years and years at a time called Canary Cry, which is on the no agenda stream three times a week. And they mentioned no agenda and I've then, after the show finished, I kind of thought, Oh, I've not really got anything else to listen to. Cause I could have one ear into a, into a podcast or so I was working. And I'll put my agenda on. And it was something, I think it was early, oh, I wanna say early 20, maybe mid 2015, somewhere around

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

GWFF:

they were talking about Trump. So I'm guessing he was running. And and I just sort of thought, Wow, what is this? This is definitely different from.

Gene:

Yeah. Well now it makes sense though. So if you were pulling cables, it almost, I guess there's some confusion in the universe that thought you were actually an it.

GWFF:

Oh yeah. Never

Gene:

And, and consequently, this, this notion of listening to no agenda just popped in your head. Because it's, it's very rare for somebody that isn't doing it type work to to get that idea popping in their head. That's uh, that's quite interesting. So now you said you acted for a while. Did you act in anything good like Dr.

GWFF:

I was I was acting in the studio where they filmed Dr. Who, How's that?

Gene:

Okay.

GWFF:

I went to a Dr. Who Christmas party by mistake once.

Gene:

Well that's pretty good. That's an exciting story.

GWFF:

Yeah,

Gene:

How is it?

GWFF:

I was in a, a bar in Cardiff and they had a games room up, up above next to the toilets and the, in the games room, they used to play board games in there and stuff.

Gene:

huh.

GWFF:

but there was this one time, there was a private party going on in there and on the door there was a sign saying BBC employees only. And at that point I was filming a show that was a BBC show, so I thought, well, that's me. And I walked in there and someone said, Who are you? And I. I'm a BBC employee. Yeah. I didn't bring a stethoscope, so, and then I kind of hung out in there for, for an evening. That was, that was alright. There were, I didn't notice any, I'm not a Doctor who fan, so, I mean, I was the old ones, but the, the newest stuff

Gene:

Okay. All

GWFF:

me off so I don't, I don't really watch it.

Gene:

So but you like the old ones who, who did you like from the old ones?

GWFF:

Anything that was on vhs, I sort of, I liked as soon as I stopped doing vhs, I had a, yeah, a videotape, right.

Gene:

Right?

GWFF:

I had a little box set when I was growing up and there was, it was the, I remember it cuz it was the first doctor who, when the dialects went up the stairs

Gene:

Mm.

GWFF:

it was a big, thing at that time, cuz

Gene:

Cause they couldn't go upstairs previously.

GWFF:

No, No. Everyone thought, Well, that's not, they're not very useful, are they? If we could just defeat these guys with a basement,

Gene:

Yeah. That's true. They could not get into s.

GWFF:

But then I think in the, in the show, someone runs into the basement or something, and then the moment happened when the dialect descended the stairs and it was a big sort of like, Oh my word.

Gene:

stairs.

GWFF:

Yeah. They hovered, they hovered above the stairs as they went down. And I

Gene:

The budget. The budget finally got beyond a hundred dollars an episode, I guess.

GWFF:

Yeah. Budget's huge for Dr. Who It's the second, second biggest budget on the bbc, I think.

Gene:

It's hard to tell. Yeah.

GWFF:

Yeah, very much so. They spend it all on the On the talent. I'm sure.

Gene:

Yeah. So what Or the lack of it. Yeah. So who, which of the old doctors did you like the most

GWFF:

Oh, I couldn't tell you the one with the scarf.

Gene:

The one, The Tom Baker.

GWFF:

that's the one. Yeah.

Gene:

That's the one. Okay.

GWFF:

Yeah. Thought he was good. I was more just into the theme tune than anything else, to be fair

Gene:

like the synthesizer music?

GWFF:

Oh yeah. I love a bit of music. I do do a lot of music myself, and synth has always been my, my personal chosen genre would be Indie Christian fringe pop. So, yeah, has a lot of synth in Indie Christian Fringe pop,

Gene:

Is there. Okay.

GWFF:

I'm the only one that's doing it as far as I'm. But that's how I role. I'm the only one that does a lot of the stuff that I

Gene:

Got it. Now, and did you act in anything other than Dr. Who, since you didn't act in Dr. Who that

GWFF:

Well, yeah. Yeah. I was in like all of the usual stuff that you do as an actor of the bill doctors, all the British sort of things. Biggest, I was in a Hollywood movie called London

Gene:

the usual

GWFF:

which

Gene:

for example,

GWFF:

Farrow in it. Didn't have a speaking part, but I did spoiler alert, stab up the main character at the end of it. So there was that. And then I was in a show called Casualty for about nine years, which is a big sort of TV drama. The, the one I was on the, the most was a a sort of continuing drama set in a hospital called Casualty. I played the son of the main character in that it was a crack head. And yeah I did that for about nine years on and off, but more off than on.

Gene:

Okay, so you play the Craighead. Any any other interesting roles?

GWFF:

I was in Harry Potter three, but not really as a role. It was just one of the featured kids in it. That's probably,

Gene:

the third one, what was that one called?

GWFF:

that's the best one.

Gene:

That? What was it called though?

GWFF:

The prisoner of Azkaban

Gene:

Okay.

GWFF:

had Gary open in it, and it was directed by Alfonso Kiran, I think the guy that did children and men. You ever seen that? What a movie that is.

Gene:

nope.

GWFF:

Oh, it's a great film. Yeah. About the end of the world. But it's a based on a short novel where Humanity Stops, has having babies, and it's set like 19 years after the last baby's born. And this, this guy finds a, a young pregnant woman and he has to

Gene:

I think I saw the ad for that. And then the whole thing is about just trying to keep her safe or something, right?

GWFF:

Yeah. Pretty much. It's quite simple narrative. It's very, very well done. Loved it.

Gene:

Yeah. Got it. Okay. Interesting. So what led you to want to give up acting and portraying such awesome characters?

GWFF:

Well, I mean, my bread and butter was doing language tapes, so I would go into a studio and do stuff like the boy has a red bicycle. What color is the boy's bicycle? And then do the

Gene:

Like training teaching other people to speak proper

GWFF:

Yeah. So that it would get sent out to young schools in normally Eastern Europe and stuff like that.

Gene:

Hmm. So that made more money than acting.

GWFF:

It was, it was, it was easier to just a constant work and, and guarantee the you'd get a good couple of days, a month of it and it would be enough to pay the rent and give me some drinking money.

Gene:

Did you, did you ever sell your voice to the BBC or anyone else?

GWFF:

No, no. I didn't do anything like that. That's, I mean, I

Gene:

there's a lot of voices available now. Computer, computer generated out of real human voices.

GWFF:

Yeah. Yeah. I miss that gravy train,

Gene:

We, we can all have our own Siri. Well, that, I mean, it's a great train for the companies. The actors got paid regular wage, but the voices are then resold for millions.

GWFF:

they get stiffed, don't they? Poor actors with their silly contracts.

Gene:

Well, yeah, you gotta, gotta make sure you have a good contract, right?

GWFF:

I just sort of thought having being a parent and, and just sort of relying on this sporadic work wasn't good enough. I was already working and living above a pub at the time, and we were leaving that pub as a family and we decided to start up our own place. And I sort of thought I'd do something else and let the pub help, like handle itself. And then after about eight, nine months, I realized that there was too much work going on in the other pub. So I'd had to quit the, the electrician stuff and go and work full-time in, in the pubs. And since then, been doing that. And then I think I had a little break where I, I sort of, I traded cryptocurrencies for about 18 months full-time. And

Gene:

Was that fun? Did you enjoy that?

GWFF:

it was the best sort of five months I've ever, like I've ever had money wise.

Gene:

Uhhuh?

GWFF:

And then it was the easily the worst 13 months that I've ever read

Gene:

Okay. Got it.

GWFF:

Yeah, it was, it was a, a very valuable lesson

Gene:

It is interesting to do things like that. I did poker for a year, so for, for one year I didn't do any other work. I just played cards. And the thing that I quickly learned probably within about two or three months was that the thing that you really enjoy doing that makes you think, Geez, I should do this for a living. Stops being fun. And so I was literally going to work to the casino to go play poker so I can beat enough hands to leave there with enough money for the day. And hopefully that happened sooner than later because I'd fallen some idiots. That would bet big. And then I wouldn't have to play poker nearly as many hours in order to get the, the amount of money that I needed to get per day. And that completely ruined poker for several years, for me until, after stopping doing it professionally, I just started Once again, just occasionally playing

GWFF:

Yeah. Playing for fun. Well, there's an advert over here for gambling adverts and it, and they have a little tagline in the government that they make them put on it, and it says, When the fun stops stop. Which I think is a good little lesson to learn. I did, I was listening to your last episode and you were talking about streaming games and, and making a living out of that. Do you not, do you not feel like that would be a, a similar kind of thing where you would get to a point

Gene:

absolutely. It would be absolutely. I've interviewed enough people that have done it professionally and even if I haven't interviewed 'em, heard enough interviews with people doing it professionally to know that that's absolutely the case. And here's the sad part, is you can tell when you watch these giant streamers playing video games, what they're doing while they're in the video game is processing, What can I do next to increase my views to generate more revenue?

GWFF:

Yeah.

Gene:

not playing a video game from the same standpoint as the viewers that they're getting are playing 'em. The average person who is playing the video game to blow off some steam, to not think about the shitty reality that's happening in the world right now. Just to kind of go off into a fantasy world and do something that, probably they can't do in general, like a normal basis. Yeah, it's total escapism. When you're doing that as a streamer who is earning their livelihood on this,

GWFF:

There's no

Gene:

it has very different, like I was watching one streamer earlier today talking to other streamers and that's when the conversation always ends up turning to business of streaming and not the fun of stream. And saying, Yeah, YouTube's been promoting these shorts to compete with TikTok, and I think people are idiots not to do 'em. I started doing shirts. I hate doing 'em. They're horrible. But when I do 'em, I get like 30,000 new subscribers a month. When I don't do 'em, I get 6,000 new subscribers a month. So doing the shorts greatly increases the amount of new subscribers I get. And in the end, that's the game. It's all about just getting more subscribers.

GWFF:

numbers. Getting

Gene:

It's numbers game because you know that somewhere between a 10th of a percent and 1% of those subscribers will, in one matter or another, give you money. And then of course, the more subscribers you have, the more opportunity for the advertising revenue coming in from YouTube. But that revenue has greatly, greatly diminished over the last three years. Three years ago, somebody that had half a million subscribers doing video games was generating over a hundred thousand dollars in revenue. And depending on, just how often they broadcast and a few other criteria, it was anywhere between one and 250,000 and a million subscribers. There was almost no chance they were doing less than $200,000 in revenue to themselves.

GWFF:

do you think that that's that was a sort of Alex Jones' fault?

Gene:

No, I don't think it was Alex Jones' fault. But there something that clearly got exposed quite a bit with Alex Jones is just how many bots there were and how many fake accounts. And, and really what it was, was the advertisers didn't know what questions to ask to make sure they're getting a good value on their advertising dollars. And so when somebody bought ads, they were just in a generic category with no control and no contractual direction on where that ad spend would happen. And that allowed. To count a lot of things that probably didn't result in new sales for the advertisers as being a legitimate advertising spend.

GWFF:

pesky YouTube, pesky Google. Don't be evil. Now. Come on. Don't be

Gene:

don't be evil. Right. Good luck on that. I took that down a decade ago

GWFF:

Yeah, I bet. Oh, I'd love to have that. That'd be great, wouldn't it? Could you imagine owning that piece? But

Gene:

that don't, don't be evil signed.

GWFF:

Yeah. Someone's gotta rap that, didn't they?

Gene:

Well, I mean there were plenty of 'em. That was the company tagline for the first seven or eight years. Don't be evil.

GWFF:

I thought it was just literally as you walked into the office and there was a big sign, but

Gene:

Right. But they have multiple offices and, and the reason that that was a sign is because that was a company tagline until they got rid of it.

GWFF:

What's the worst tagline in history?

Gene:

Well, it's, it's really kind of a. It's a dangerous tagline because it sounds hilarious when you do it. It's like, ha ha, what we're doing has nothing to do with anything political. It's we're, we're just providing the world with email and, and then it, I think if a company grows enough, it's almost impossible for them to not be perceived as evil in some way or fashion. So

GWFF:

gotta remind your employees to not be evil, constantly something terribly, they should have that in the Houses of Parliament. That'd be useful.

Gene:

Don't be

GWFF:

Yeah. That might, might get the public a little clued up.

Gene:

Well I think it, the problem is evil is so subjective

GWFF:

Yeah. It's good and bad in everyone, aren't there?

Gene:

it's, it's hard to try and nail down exactly what it is. And yeah, and I think in the UK you guys have just as much issues with your politicians there, as we do here. Seem to have a little more freedom of them yelling at each other in, in parliaments that we can watch on tv.

GWFF:

You guys all sort of, sort of try and pretend like you gotta stick up your ass and it's just, it doesn't, don't really work. Whereas we are, we are more like just in a, in a school playground, shouting at each other. And I think if you had, if you give them buckets of mud, there would be a point where they would start fleeing that mud around.

Gene:

Oh, absolutely. I think they would,

GWFF:

Yeah. Be interesting, Be good tv.

Gene:

well, it would be, and somebody could turn into a reality TV series and make some money.

GWFF:

Well at the moment there's a show called I'm a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here, which has been running for about 20 years now and they take sort of 10, 11 celebrities and they sling him in the Australian jungle and they make him do trials for their food.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

GWFF:

And we've had a guy called Matt Hancock who's an MP who's gone into it and he is the first sort of major working MP to go in it. And he was the health minister during.

Gene:

Yeah,

GWFF:

So the public gets to vote for which one of these douche bags has to do with the trials where they have to eat crocodile penis and, the vagina of a cow and stuff.

Gene:

that sounds like a super easy show.

GWFF:

oh yeah, it's, it's great. From a sort of sociological standpoint.

Gene:

how Joe Rogan got his start.

GWFF:

Oh really? I thought it was a standup

Gene:

well, he was a standup that he was a no K standup. He was certainly not a famous standup. But his big break came when he became the TV host or presenter for you guys of a show called what was it called?

GWFF:

wasn't he a history channel thing or something? Wasn't it?

Gene:

no, no, no. It was I think it was in an nbc, I believe. But it, it was a, I think it was one of the main networks, but it was a show and the name will come to me eventually here, But it was a show where essentially people have to compete in, in challenges of things that they would either be grossed out by, or would be perceived as dangerous. Like, for example, eating pastry with bugs in them

GWFF:

Mm.

Gene:

and

GWFF:

Considered normal these days considered

Gene:

consider, Yeah, consider, well, people didn't realize back then that that was a delicacy. But these, these days things are, I think would be a little different. But that got him on television and be seen by a lot of people and definitely helped his comedy career in a lot of ways. And I think. He brought him into the, the, the Hollywood sort of mainstream that allowed him to make a lot more connections. So I really don't think without that show, yeah, it was definitely exposure. I don't think without that show, Rogan would've been anything more than the guy that some people that really enjoyed comedy would've seen that enjoy standup. He would've been known in, in New York and la but probably not in many other places.

GWFF:

I mean, nowadays his show. That's a different beast though, isn't it? That's something that he's grown through. Perseverance and concentration and just, and,

Gene:

the talk show,

GWFF:

Yeah. The, that's the most popular talk show on the planet at the moment. Isn't that,

Gene:

I guess, I don't know. It's hard to say because I don't really trust the stats coming in from the guys that owned that show.

GWFF:

That's a good point.

Gene:

So whether it's, it is, it is, I, I, I think honestly, most of the things that are listed as the most watched and popular. Are only listed because they, they happen in the US and realistically, if you start looking at how many people watch Chinese or India television, it is millions and millions more than watch US television.

GWFF:

Oh yeah, of course. Well, I guess in the Western civilization then

Gene:

Yeah. The only one we care about.

GWFF:

Yeah. Our

Gene:

it's, it's

GWFF:

not the other guys.

Gene:

really matter. Fear Factor, by the way, was the show that Joe Rogen Hoston,

GWFF:

Yes, I have heard of

Gene:

he was there for 12 years,

GWFF:

That was normal people though, weren't it? It weren't

Gene:

Correct. Yes. It was, Well,

GWFF:

Did they do a celebrity

Gene:

it was a reality show. They may have, I don't recall. I was not an avid watch of that. I would occasionally watch it, but it always struck me as the things that they present as these big challenges to people that really, they didn't really seem like much of a challenge to me. They were just sort of like, Unusual. There are things that are unusual, not things that are actually challenging,

GWFF:

I I've got, I've, I know a lot of people that work on, I'm a celebrity, Get me out of here. My, my wife used to work at itv, which is the, the network that runs a show and stuff. And I won't say that any of these people are explicitly aware of this. It's a bit similar to how the, the news models do their thing. But I think these challenges, they're more like rituals. They're more sort of, they lock a, lock a celebrity in a box, and they pour crickets and scorpions in there. That's a, that's a boo box. I mean, that's been around for a while. These are things and, and, and then there's a lot symbology and just all sorts of stuff that goes on with it that you kind of can't overlook. A lot of snakes, there's always snakes

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Which I don't understand the irrational and fear of snakes that people have to begin with, but.

GWFF:

probably got something to do with the serpent that tricked eve into eating that fig, Right? That made her all smart all of a sudden.

Gene:

Well, I don't think it really does because it's not confined to just people from the western world. Just a lot of people seem to have a, an irrational predisposition to having a fear of snakes.

GWFF:

Well, they may be. They, they had their dragons over in China. They couldn't have, they weren't all good. Were they the dragons? They must have been cuz he's always a bad guy in everyone's myth. Mytho and legends isn't there.

Gene:

Well, you gotta have a bad guy, otherwise, who's gonna be

GWFF:

You

Gene:

the good guy who's gonna fight?

GWFF:

Gota Cote in there. And then the Central America and North South America. And then you America, I

Gene:

a

GWFF:

meaner America itself is, is named after a snake. God, America. Right. That's, that was the, that's the, the et

Gene:

that's named after a morego is pci.

GWFF:

hmm. Is it?

Gene:

Yeah.

GWFF:

All right. You'll have to call me on

Gene:

It's, it's an Italian.

GWFF:

Yeah. Really.

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah.

GWFF:

A bit of a coincidence then the Old America guy was a thing. I dunno, I've seen a lot of weird ass stuff on the internet, so my brain's all a bit

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. Good, good bit of advice. Don't believe things you see on the

GWFF:

I don't believe enough of it. But, you can still see it. It's like I, I always, I'm a, I'm a, I'm an on the fencer. I don't get off the fence. I think the fence is the best place to be

Gene:

You like sitting up there on the fence

GWFF:

you get perspective with the other sides of the fence. You can see, once you jump down on one side of a fence, you've lost perspective of the other side. So I quite like it up there.

Gene:

That's true. That is good.

GWFF:

all stuff like, I mean, one of the ones that's the most divisive would be the flat earth stuff. The shape of the planet, all that, that thing I, I'm quite happy up on the fence with that one. Like, until I get shine it myself. I mean, I can see merits in both ways.

Gene:

you?

GWFF:

I've traveled a little bit. Yeah, a little bit. Not massive

Gene:

Outside of the uk.

GWFF:

Yeah. Yeah. I've been to America a few times, been to Mexico, been to obviously done Europe loads and that's about, that's about it to be

Gene:

I, I, I can't envision somebody thinking the earth is flat once they've flown over it.

GWFF:

Well, the thing is, I think if the earth, if well look, let's say that the earth isn't flat, well then the numbers that we are being given are a crock of ship. Cuz you have lasers that can paint a target from well beyond the curvature of the earth that we are told about this was it quarter of an eight of an inch. I dunno, My, I've, it's been a long time since I looked into the old flat earth bollocks, let's face it. But just, just, there's weird stuff on either side and you have to admit that no one's ever getting the a hundred percent of the truth out of anything. It, I don't think, personally, it's, I, if I was, had to lean across the fence in any direction, I'd say that, big rock flying through space kind of makes sense with the telescopes and stuff. But then having been a kid that grew up, I was, I was 14 when nine 11 happened. Then I was told everything was, it was all one thing that is gonna make you a questionable time in someone's life. Question everything for the rest of your life. It's not my fault that I've, I've I've got skepticism en ingrained

Gene:

Well, I think skepticism is very good and I certainly wouldn't fault somebody that lives in a tribal village in the Pakistan mountains thinking that the earth is flat. That, that seems like a reasonable supposition from someone. Whose furthest distance traveled is probably less than 20 kilometers. But it's hard to see somebody that has done world travel still maintaining that

GWFF:

Is that because you're up in a plane and you can, you're higher up. See,

Gene:

you can literally see the curvature from

GWFF:

but then they say, don't they? All the windows are bloody round

Gene:

what they can say whatever they want. I mean,

GWFF:

but they are. But you look at a round, through a round lens, it makes, it rounds things out. If you had a square

Gene:

Well, there there is this thing in the plane that used to be a lot more visible and, and maybe for people that are a little older than nine 11 we got to see a lot more often. Planes used to fly with the door open the front cabin.

GWFF:

Yeah.

Gene:

As somebody who generally flies in the first or second row I've, I've watched that view through the, the

GWFF:

The wide screen

Gene:

ces so many times that it's not even interesting.

GWFF:

yeah, yeah,

Gene:

And yeah, there,

GWFF:

I went up in that cabin once or twice. I saw that

Gene:

Oh, you did? There you go. Yeah.

GWFF:

very young, mind you,

Gene:

mm-hmm. Yeah. Well, they've, they've kind of stopped doing that

GWFF:

and, and it lame.

Gene:

I think it, it's contributing to the lack of pilots, because I think a lot of kids got that, got that type of exposure of being able to visit the cockpit. They, that planted a seed in their little brains

GWFF:

They were enamored by it. Whoever came up with that idea was a genius, was a, as a HR genius back in the day.

Gene:

I don't know if anybody was doing it beforehand, but I know that PanAm always did that whenever there were kids on a flight, PanAm always did a little visit to the cockpit for them.

GWFF:

And if, if anyone's gonna hijack a plane, the kid is least likely to do it.

Gene:

Right. That's true. I mean, there's always a chance.

GWFF:

You could have some badass kid, but

Gene:

probably least likely. So

GWFF:

There's I've gotta say there's a, there's an announcement being made by a big orange Nazi. What do you reckon? What's, what's he gonna do?

Gene:

Which announcement?

GWFF:

The, he's, There's this thing, right? The the Trump thing. He's gonna announce. He's, he's, he's held this cloud of announcement though. Yeah.

Gene:

there an announcement today?

GWFF:

No, he's been saying it for ages, isn't he? I'm gonna do something big

Gene:

well, I think, yeah,

GWFF:

do you reckon? He's just gonna run, But if he's gonna run,

Gene:

well he is obviously gonna run because he got pissed off when when the Governor of Florida, when DeSantis said or didn't say that he's not running. Like when DeSantis was asked if he was gonna run, he did the usual political thing. It was like, well, I'm, I'm,

GWFF:

I'm

Gene:

enjoying what I'm doing right now, but I'm leaving all options.

GWFF:

Yeah.

Gene:

And then Trump got pissed off that, Well, wait a minute, this answer is supposed to recuse himself and not run because he knows I'm running. It's like, Fuck you, dude. I don't,

GWFF:

Maybe, maybe DeSantis has just got a holiday album coming out of covers like Christmas covers, eh,

Gene:

I don't know that he's a particularly good singer, but I guess you never can tell until something

GWFF:

forward to the no agenda, end of show mixes at Christmas time where, you know, DeSantis clauses come in down town.

Gene:

Those are, there's some good ones, there's a lot of talent and the no agenda producer network.

GWFF:

Oh, yeah. It's, it's the most, this is the

Gene:

Lot of people. Yeah. And I, I really wonder how many of them have, have utilized those talents previously. And how many of 'em are just sort of been, closet musicians not really doing it outside of their own home to anybody, and then create something for no agenda to be played to? Literally millions of listeners

GWFF:

Yes, I, I did, I've done my Fair share of end show mixes about seven or eight of them.

Gene:

have

GWFF:

Yeah, I've enjoyed every single one of them. I thought they were so much fun to do and it's such a shame that the long versions don't get played for whatever,

Gene:

Yeah, that's true. They, they do need to constrain the length a little bit.

GWFF:

Well,

Gene:

does, does get long.

GWFF:

I mean, you've got I've told this to Tom Starkweather. I think that Melo DSLs should just pivot and become the no agenda, end of show mix podcast. And he should, he should have long and do like a sort of top of the pod pops, but with,

Gene:

Yeah. That's not a bad idea. It's a good point. As long as it's not adding more work to Adam.

GWFF:

Well, yeah, but it's the same thing as a shop, isn't it? It just sort of decentralizes it.

Gene:

Right, right. Yeah. I mean, if somebody is, a custodian of all those submissions and then plays the full versions and then makes a show out of it, that would be brilliant.

GWFF:

Well, I, I've, I've got quite a decent relationship with, so Chris Wilson who I'm desperate to marry my, my daughter. I'm, I've wanted her to marry his son if I could. No agenda arranged marriages, anyone

Gene:

Oh, well, I don't see why not. I mean, we have titles.

GWFF:

Exactly. We're we're almost there, aren't

Gene:

it's, it's just the hop, skip and a jump,

GWFF:

not that far,

Gene:

just having titles to having a range of marriages to increase your holdings.

GWFF:

We, we've often spoke about forming the Gitman Nation players and having just a full, the full deal. And I, that's what I'm working on at the moment. I mean, my, my dream is to provide now John and Adam, their exit strategy on a plate.

Gene:

Hmm.

GWFF:

That's just what I, what I

Gene:

Well, they're looking for one, so you better hurry up.

GWFF:

They've got it. They've, it's already there. It doesn't need to be. We, we are gonna do a production company and start making some, some pretty tasty productions. There's, like you said, there's enough talent in the, in the Gimo nation to fill every, every void remotely these days. So

Gene:

Especially it.

GWFF:

to work, to work a level, a standard that is of a high quality, This is the, the, the difference, the writing, the everything about it can be put together, which can rival the biggest and the most expensive productions on the planet. I mean, did you see the rings of power

Gene:

No.

GWFF:

It was, it was, I got 10 minutes in That's all I could manage. It waster 1.8 billion. Like if they, That's all they can come up with. With that, I'll tell you, I'll do anything for it On a shoestring

Gene:

Yeah. I, I think, and I'm not sure when this is gonna happen, I don't have the exact dates, but I will make a prediction that the, the end to all of the woke Hollywood stuff is going to come from a direction that most people are completely unaware of and couldn't imagine being the case. And that is a very simple replacement. A complete replacement of actors by computer generated models.

GWFF:

Could happen.

Gene:

the, the idea of actors being famous is absurd. One of the,

GWFF:

isn't it? It's They're always called stars.

Gene:

well, they call themselves stars. I don't think intelligent people would ever call them. Like I said, I don't think intelligent people would call 'em stars.

GWFF:

It's the sicker

Gene:

much it's, it's the same people that call politicians leaders. They're not fucking leaders.

GWFF:

Elected

Gene:

they're followers, but they're really public servants is what you ought to call 'em. Anytime you refer to a politician, refer to them as a public

GWFF:

Public servant. Yeah, a public slave.

Gene:

Well,

GWFF:

the, the, but this is the thing is that politics, by its very nature, is a reactionary industry. Culture is the one that leads politics. And this is why to have an effect. And if you are, look, my goal is not just to present the exit strategy on a plate to John and Adam. I believe that that will be a milestone along my journey. My ultimate, ultimate goal is to save my children's, children's future from this weird ass Mad Max on the outside. Judge, dread on the inside. Weird, twisted future that these strange elites think that is possible, which they're driving towards at a rate like you wouldn't believe. What you would

Gene:

I, I think it's really, it's a.

GWFF:

death

Gene:

It's a cult. You call it religion if you want, but it's definitely not based on the thing that they keep repeating over and over, which is science. It's, it's based on emotion and desire and self-preservation, driven by fear. You know how when you're a kid and your your parents tell you, that you can have one candy bar but you can't have anymore, and then you manage to find time when none of 'em are in the kitchen and you open up the box of chocolates and, and, and you eat like four or five of 'em, and then you put it away and hope nobody notices.

GWFF:

Mm.

Gene:

And,

GWFF:

So got a similar thing going on. Yeah.

Gene:

always get discovered because subconsciously you feel that guilt.

GWFF:

Mm.

Gene:

and your actions, the way that you act in pretending that nothing's wrong, betrays your guilt, and your siblings are usually the first ones to pick it up, not the parents, because you're pretty good as a kid in learning how to keep your parents guessing, but your siblings see right through you. It's like, Okay, what, what did you do wrong? You obviously did something wrong the way you're acting.

GWFF:

Yeah. See, I, I never had no siblings, so I just, just, we feel unique. And also my parents, they sort of said, It's your own body. You're screwing up, so eat as much of that crap as you want.

Gene:

Well, that's one way to deal with it, for sure.

GWFF:

And and also the, to just finish that off as well. The whole thing about, it's like when you're buying fake booze, you're trying to get in a club that you're too old for and there's a group of you, right? And you know that in the group, say you've got 12 people going to a place and three of them are questionable. They're right on the edge of the age. They're like gonna turn 18 or 21 or whatever soon. And you kind of spread 'em out through the group, right? To sort of, so that you got confident, confident,

Gene:

Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.

GWFF:

so, so on and so forth. That, that is like you've correctly predicted. It is ending. It won't be there by the end of this century if, if they have their way. Cuz the, the Beijing are already trialing the this, this thing that pre predicts guilty faces and actions and body language and shifty sort of, remotely and having them scooped up pre-crime

Gene:

And it's not that difficult to do. It's, it's something that a lot of people have actually learned and been able to do themselves getting computers to be able to. Do it with AI platform help. It's just a matter of time.

GWFF:

It's the data they need to gather the data.

Gene:

Exactly. And one of my all time favorite movies which is Brazil. Have you seen Brazil?

GWFF:

Brazil is possibly my favorite movie of all time.

Gene:

All right, well we have something in common right

GWFF:

I loved, I met Terry Gillum and I sat there with him and I, I spoke with him for about four hours

Gene:

wow. Now I'm very jealous.

GWFF:

oh, he got drunk. It was brilliant and had a camera as well, and I recorded all of it. It was amazing.

Gene:

that's great. Would love to see that.

GWFF:

Oh, it's been hoovered up by the someone

Gene:

Hoovered up

GWFF:

Yeah. So we, I was working at a place called The Round House in Camden, and it's a very famous venue in North London. Very cool place. A lot of artsy fary people play there, and just anyone who's sort of respected by their own peers tends to play there. And it, they, they did a sort of social youth thing where there was like famous people and youths from the area were invited in to spend an evening with a whole host of very interesting and, successful, connected people. And I was made aware that Terry Gillian was there when I got there and I said, Where is he Point me to him. I need to have a chat about this film he made.

Gene:

Yeah.

GWFF:

and I spoke, I I out the three hour, three, four hours. I'd say 70 to 80% of the time was all about the dream sequences.

Gene:

Interesting.

GWFF:

Yeah. Those things really get me in that

Gene:

Yeah. Oh, it was, it was, it was a great film. I've been a fan ever since it came out. I saw it in the theater and then I've had it I've, I've owned the copy of it for Forever on various formats.

GWFF:

The sound tracker alone is so good. Ugh.

Gene:

Oh, it's, it's, it

GWFF:

favorite song of all time. That that song Love

Gene:

Which, which one?

GWFF:

The main, Jeff Mulder, the title Brazil, His

Gene:

The, the bra Brazil. That one?

GWFF:

When HARs were entertained in June.

Gene:

That, yeah. It's, it is

GWFF:

She wouldn't let me have it as the wedding song, but then the government wouldn't let me have a wedding song either. So there you

Gene:

what, what do you mean they wouldn't let you have a wedding

GWFF:

We got married during the Coate stage.

Gene:

so you couldn't play music?

GWFF:

They didn't want anyone dancing.

Gene:

What,

GWFF:

They said that dancing was dangerous.

Gene:

what?

GWFF:

Yeah,

Gene:

What the hell do you live, man? Oh my God.

GWFF:

they're like in London.

Gene:

I'm starting to think this whole tidal wave that's gonna sweep over England might be a good thing. I mean, No,

GWFF:

we've been here a while and it ain't going away. I'll tell you that

Gene:

Yeah. We'll see.

GWFF:

this was the place that those pesky Blum and Fallen Angels escaped to when they were flooded out of the that, that, that first continent before the big dude came down and crushed it all and split us all up with the different faces and colors and languages and all that stuff.

Gene:

Wait at Landis?

GWFF:

Yeah, so there was that multiple civilizations, and then they all had this like joining Uping in the middle where you had this one guy Nimrods and he built the Tower of Baby. He thought, Oh, I'm gonna go and take out God and be God. That'd be nice. It's the same goal that this slot I've got. That's the thing is their MO doesn't change. What do they want? Immortality. Why do they want it so they can be God? Are they

Gene:

do they want it

GWFF:

now? Yeah, always. Now, Now, now.

Gene:

Yeah. I'm not a fan of their mortality. I think it, it's overrated, first of all.

GWFF:

Have you tried it

Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. Done. Been there, done that.

GWFF:

The thing is, is that when they get to that stage, I, I will want the immortality because there's only one. It's like, it's gonna be Highlander, isn't it? Where there's one that's gonna have to take the others out.

Gene:

Well, immortality works that way.

GWFF:

It's brutal. It's a very dog eat, dog

Gene:

it, it, it requires a sacrifice. And the thing is, it, it's the journey, not the destination that is interesting.

GWFF:

Oh totally.

Gene:

achieving immortality is interesting because it's a journey. Having immortality is a dead end.

GWFF:

No, hold on. Isn't that, It's a constant journey. You can't tell me it's a dead

Gene:

No, it really is.

GWFF:

You would run out of things to see and do

Gene:

the, the interest level in the things you see and do approaches zero.

GWFF:

but then doesn't your, You are innate drive to.

Gene:

is a black pill.

GWFF:

Yeah, but there's, Hold on. Cuz if you've, if you are someone that is of a mind and a means to be able to achieve immortality in the first place, that puts you amongst the first of your, of your race to ever do so as far as their, their knowledge base

Gene:

Well, not really, but Okay,

GWFF:

Well, exactly. But in their eyes, in the 7.7 billion people out here, you're not one of the average, are you? Most people are gonna be mortal and you are gonna be first. Surely you've had to be so, along the way, find pleasure in everything. And, and isn't that the, the point about the, the familiarity breeds contempts. And so if you do something long enough, but then that doesn't, that that contempt sort of is a,

Gene:

Do you think, do

GWFF:

allows you to find new

Gene:

if you win the lottery right now, do you think you appreciate more the fact that other people lost the lottery or that there's something you can do with the money you.

GWFF:

I would be crazy mad for Jesus, because that would be a miracle. I don't buy lottery tickets,

Gene:

Well, that's fine, but let's say it's a

GWFF:

Hypothetically if I did have it I had a, about five months ago I had a change in, i, I pe cocked. I, I hit this plateau of myself where I found this, this lovely little rhythm. It took me to quit two major vices in my life to discover it. But that's when, it's what you said earlier about when the funds stopped, stopped, You know what? The fund had stopped. I was doing the things, the repetitive actions, the counting of the numbers, the max stacking on games, playing cooler duty all the time, hanging out with people that were playing cooler duty all the time. And then bouncing back to a nice good RPG for a few hours to finish my night off. A like little top down, click 'em up. And and did, yeah. Saw some wonderful narratives and stuff, but I felt that my time is getting wasted more than it's.

Gene:

Oh, sure.

GWFF:

it. And so I stopped that and I stopped smoking and using Marana, the holy Herb,

Gene:

All right.

GWFF:

and I thought I'd just focus on developing a television show. So that's what I've been doing and it's going very well. I've got five or six people incredibly interested and we're close to fashion out pitch pitches and I know that I've got the

Gene:

And you know why it's more fun to do the television show than to play Call of Duty?

GWFF:

You've been proactive rather than reactive.

Gene:

No. It's because there's a chance of failure.

GWFF:

Hmm. I dunno about that.

Gene:

strong chance of failure and call of duty. You never die. You're immortal.

GWFF:

Yeah.

Gene:

what happens is you repeat things over and over, and.

GWFF:

I have an issue with that sort of mindset. To be fair, just I feel that that's a very limiting mindset. I don't believe that you have one shot. I think no means not today. Like if I went up to a chick and every chick that I ever hit on who said no to me, first off, most of the girls that I ever step with, they said no to me straight away. I, I'm not a someone that you warm up to initially. You have to spend a bit of time to get there. So then that's just a lesson for life, isn't it? Basically, you, you don't, Winners are people that have been through losing and kept going, and they kept going and they kept going, and they only ever get remembered as winners. Because once you become a winner, you elevate yourself above the losers that puts you up to that next level.

Gene:

Well, yeah, I mean, it, it's, it's sort of axiomatic,

GWFF:

yeah, they can see what, what, what ac what's that?

Gene:

Well, I mean, by definition, a winner is somebody that, that manages to avoid losing.

GWFF:

Right? Oh, of course. Yeah. But to, to do the winning, you have to go through a lot of losses. And people don't remember those losses.

Gene:

Well, you only have to go through the enough losses that you get to win. It doesn't have to be a lot.

GWFF:

But to be consistently good at something and to get better against better opponents as you go along, that takes practice and time and effort. And if you go up to that first one and that's, like you said, there's a high chance of them turning around and saying no. Well maybe that's because the people that aren't doing it right aren't doing it right. Like, how much did they, how much research have they done? How mu, how well do they know the people that they've sat in front of, do they know their, what, what they like to eat and where they like to eat and who they like to eat with, basically. That kind of tells you a lot about someone, cuz we, we like forever, when I was first dating girls, going out for something to eat with a girl would be the easiest way of getting alone time with her. Cuz you would say, Let's go for lunch. And they'd say, Yes, that would be nice. And then you'd go for lunch together and, and eating with someone's very intimate thing. So it tells you a lot about someone. And the more research you do, the better chances there are that you're gonna get that pitch sealed, isn't it? Isn't it?

Gene:

Right, And as as your star starts to rise, then you don't really have to ask them to go to dinner. You just ask them for a drink, and then eventually you just ask them for a shag.

GWFF:

Exactly. You can kind of have a relationship with someone. And the thing is, is that every relationship with someone is a relationship and.

Gene:

going towards relationships, but

GWFF:

Well that is what it is though. It is. You are forming a relationship, even if it's one that's a very sort of new bar and going to be aborted or terminated in the pre to it being grown into a wonderful, loving living thing. You know it can be terminated at any time, can't it? But it's still a relationship. That's what you're growing along the way. You can't keep it at that level, cuz the longer you spend time with each other, the more it goes that way. Whether you like it or not.

Gene:

Yeah, that's true.

GWFF:

It's proximity, isn't it? That's why twins have such a connection with each other cuz they, they spend formation with their brains pulsating in an environment that they are only aware of on a. On a very, sort of rapidly growing level, and they come outta that place and now suddenly they're out in the road and one can go right, and the other one can go left. But you've had multiple instances of people saying, I know, I know exactly what, what, when it had happened, I stopped. Everyone said, Are you all right? And I went, Oh, no, Summit. Terrible has

Gene:

that's interesting, isn't it?

GWFF:

It's the time. It's the time and the proximity, the the two together, that's, that's why the elites are so interested in having twins. I mean, how many twins has Elon got?

Gene:

I don't know how many has he got?

GWFF:

I think he's got like two or three pairs.

Gene:

Really?

GWFF:

I know he is, got at least nine kids and I'm, but I think there's like nine times he's had children. I'm, I've, I'm, I'm in agreement. I think the guy's clowning himself personally, but then I think that's what they've been doing for ages.

Gene:

I think well, I mean in, in, in a general sense, that's what having kids is. It's trying to cl yourself.

GWFF:

It's like you grow, you chip off a little bit of the plant and you nurture it and you stick it in and you wait for the roots to grow out the tip of the thing that you'd brutally

Gene:

Yeah. And you hope the clone isn't too differently, corrupt from the way you were

GWFF:

and the thing is, if, if we've got that going on, then there's, that throws into question that awful, awful thing of incest and really incest comes down to sort of generational incest.

Gene:

mm-hmm.

GWFF:

which is like, as far as I can see,

Gene:

So we're talking about the royal family now. Okay.

GWFF:

Which one? The one of Kent or the one of all of, Yeah. But you

Gene:

They're all one family. If you get down to.

GWFF:

Yeah, of course. Yeah. I, that's kind of, But people have have accepted it almost of it. They, they've just kind of

Gene:

Well, I mean, you just wanted, you mentioned just earlier today that you wanted to

GWFF:

The king.

Gene:

get some Yeah. Get, get your kid lined up with another no agenda listener's kid. That's what, yeah. You, you want to expand the family and gain land

GWFF:

a t Yeah, it's a tactical. It always has been, isn't it?

Gene:

It's how you get

GWFF:

really lost sight

Gene:

you maintain wealth and power

GWFF:

but then

Gene:

through your

GWFF:

the, that's, that's why the flip side of it is that you have is the best way to exploit that and to maintain position whilst you do that is to then pump into your population and your society an overt message of, Hey, you can only do this then, and here is a load of sexual stuff to make. You want to do it all the time. But it's like, Well, hold on. You're telling me on one hand that that's a bad thing and it shouldn't happen even though you are up to it. And on the second hand you're then saying, Eh, have a look at all this stuff. It's really nice.

Gene:

Well, I'd say it's kinda like stranger in a strange land. You've got you've got certain appeasement that you need to keep the populous in check through. Meanwhile, you as the elite, have to be working out the, the plan for complete total domination.

GWFF:

Over and over and over again, all those thousands of years of the same plan, and it still hasn't worked.

Gene:

Well, they haven't refined it fully yet.

GWFF:

They refined it once and it got very close, and it, it caused a calamus event that really destroyed a, a lot of what you would have considered to be if you put those people in today's world, you'd call them souls as humans, and, and they would say that they

Gene:

Now, which one are you referring to?

GWFF:

the pre-flood delusion, isn't it?

Gene:

Oh, sure. Yeah.

GWFF:

Your tar and your, your, all the staff thoughts and the, the way that they arrange their cities in order to harness atmospheric energy and the technology that went along with that for a long time. And that was just kind of, it's the stuff that you don't write down. And it's like the people that win get to write history, don't they? And

Gene:

They do. They do. And one of the things I've brought up since we're doing the sitting on the fence looking at the moon thing, is

GWFF:

Second half a show already before the

Gene:

it's well into,

GWFF:

Well, into

Gene:

half.

GWFF:

The siren?

Gene:

is the, you, you think about Well, we can go back about 8,000 years in, in the uncovering the variety of artifacts that we've seen about civilization. We, we have some skeleton fines that are much, much older into the millions of years, but, But there's a big black hole between those skeletons and the, the technology. Any type of buildings, anything that appears to be manmade has survived and,

GWFF:

cube came down like Kubrick

Gene:

Right, exactly. Exactly.

GWFF:

on a level.

Gene:

My my thought on that was always, well, what, let's say that, that we have a nuclear war initiated by the United States because of Ukraine tomorrow.

GWFF:

Were they gonna initiate?

Gene:

well, US is always the one to initiate these things.

GWFF:

but yeah. But are they, are they saying that it's they're saying that, we are saying that they're initiating it, but the story is that they didn't

Gene:

Well,

GWFF:

that's basically they,

Gene:

It's a response. It, it's the same response that liberals always have. They, they respond to language with actual physical violence. That, that's effectively the United States modus of operandi here.

GWFF:

It's not everyone over there though.

Gene:

it's, well, it's the majority of the people here. It's the people that elected the politicians that we currently

GWFF:

Yeah, but that's, that's assuming that one vote matters.

Gene:

It doesn't matter how many votes matter because the people that didn't agree with that aren't willing to do anything about it.

GWFF:

I don't believe that for an instance. I

Gene:

Oh, absolutely. We've

GWFF:

you've always that. Yeah, but that's the major populace. I think within that major populace, you have a sliding a level that goes from one to a, like the whole thing is, is that one of the biggest tools that the enemy of humanity is used to divide us is this polarized thought system of a, of a red or a blue. Like once they worked out the primary colors and the red and the blue and then there was yellow. And yellow was obviously above the red and the blue. Cause it brought light and it's a tightly different color and it's a different hue of it's like, like if you have ultraviolet or infrared, right? You've got ultraviolet, which is obviously blue, and then infrared, it's literally called infrared. But you take that and you put that across identity politics and all these different viewpoints on everything. Do you drink bloom? Mean they get two options, don't you? There's obviously one better option. You've got Coke or Pepsi. Everyone knows what the better one is. But why does the other one exist? Yeah. Can the, can, I dunno. But that whole, that's a game plan to split people up and it's dividing, conquer, isn't it? And as long as you can achieve 50 50 on, as on many key areas as possible, then you have enough space. Is that when you're building a, a character on Skyrim or, or like an RPG or something and you don't wanna spend, you wanna MinMax in a way that kind of starts as you go along. Like that's, that's what they're doing. They're, they're pushing that in different areas and then they're using faked elections or rig elections to take a census on that area and see which, where it leans to the messaging. Like which, which bit are they pumping out is working, where, where can they dial it up and dial it down? That's

Gene:

Well, it, it sounds like you just called all America a bunch of NPCs to be

GWFF:

No cause amongst those NPCs you have players, and that's what I'm saying, those players are very much able to, like DeSantis is coming up, that pendulum's gonna swing back and you

Gene:

Oh, they'll find something on.

GWFF:

Oh yeah. But he's, no, I don't think they will. I think he's kind of a bit anointed, to be fair. I mean look where he went to school,

Gene:

Where do you go to school?

GWFF:

Yale,

Gene:

Oh, they'll definitely find something on him.

GWFF:

they always gonna get something on everyone. But it's just like it's power corrupts absolutely an absolute power corrupts, doesn't it?

Gene:

Generally, Yeah, because it, it, it should, It's the way that we're built, we're built with self-preservation in mind.

GWFF:

But there's a, there's another level to it where you have self-preservation and that stacks on top of elevation. And when you have a sense of above and below, it gives you perspective on who or who you are. Now seeing now that you've been raised above, you can see all the heads that are above you, but everyone below you in your area can see you at the same time, and so on and so forth. That is kind of what the Tower of Babbel e even sort of is, is that's why the, the, it's often spoken about that the end times are like the same ones as the days of Noah. I hate to go like bubble bashy, but that's just my worldview where I'm at. Like I see that. I recognize that. I think that, that you could imprint that upon multiple civilizations. And then to answer your question of the skeletons and how old they are, I would say that consciousness is very much attributed to the experience of time that they're kind of, they're tied to each other. So for instance, a fly will experience life just as long as a human will, but their sense of time is completely different. And we like a tree. It's totally, totally different sense of growing and going from one thing to another UNC consciousness. And it don't mean that anything that's alive and experiencing that don't got feelings now, does it? They, they could hurt. You can hurt a dog and a, a worm and a bee and all that sort of stuff, but that's what makes people NPCs, isn't it?

Gene:

Can you heard an ai?

GWFF:

Yeah, totally. Yeah. You can hurt his feelings.

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

GWFF:

Yeah, I think you can be rude to something and there's another way of approaching every situation that is in a amenable way. That's the art of, of discourse, isn't it Really? Is, is keeping it going and getting talking to each other for a while.

Gene:

Well, I think the art of discourse is getting the other person to say your message while thinking it's their original idea.

GWFF:

Inception, you mean?

Gene:

What's inception?

GWFF:

You know the movie Inception where they go inside someone's dreams to affect, the dreams to affect and then, but it brings an out world impact because they end up going and making a different decision.

Gene:

So I don't know if I, if I should admit this or not. I've never actually seen the movie.

GWFF:

Oh, it's great.

Gene:

Yeah.

GWFF:

Yeah, man.

Gene:

Let's uh, lean out to the capo,

GWFF:

or something or like, smoke. Smoke a big joint before round. That's what I used to do. So I'd burn a, burn a big joint and if it ever dipped in the middle, I'd be like, I'm going to get some a drink. I'd run outside quickly. Just have a little naughty shortly. Go back in. Cause

Gene:

So how good of a movie is it if you, if it requires that you. Get your mind into an alternative

GWFF:

It does, it doesn't require it. It just, it just for me, how I experienced it, I, I've very much enjoyed it because I saw multiple things. I mean, I hadn't smoked for a few weeks and I thought, I'll save it up and I'll, I'll go in there like really baked and see how I feel about it. And it just, it was just brilliant. I really loved it. And I like enjoying other people's products whilst in a state that's much more suggestive, like I'm already buying into the fact that I'm looking at a black mirror and a screen and, it's, it's basically magic and it spells and it's all this stuff hitting you like a million miles faster than has ever been available. So we think but it's, it's different. I feel like you have to be in the river and along the flow in order to make a difference. Like I said, you can't just be a stick in the mud.

Gene:

Sure. Not sure how that ties back with We're talking about what's happening with the midterm elections being on confirmation essentially of the United States not wanting to make any changes in its in the way that, that the US population is preceding the world. I, I guess I would say

GWFF:

Yeah. Well this is just like, they, they have an option to not do something, and so they're not doing it. It's like inaction is a form of, is a choice, isn't it?

Gene:

it is. Yes, absolutely.

GWFF:

and that's what they've chosen to do by doing that. But I also think that the messaging and the timing and everything about it is very they're, they're very powerful right now. They've, they've saved up a, a big old sacrifice and

Gene:

again, just continue my thoughts. So let's say we have a nuclear Armageddon tomorrow.

GWFF:

Oh, right. Yeah. Yeah.

Gene:

And with the number of nuclear missiles out there, number of war heads. Literally everybody dies. There's nobody,

GWFF:

it?

Gene:

nobody left alive. So

GWFF:

Just the

Gene:

you look at the current architecture, the current information storage, we have all of our current technology.

GWFF:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

You can see how some of this will survive the nuclear catastrophe for immediately, right? But how does this look a hundred years later or a thousand years later, or 10,000 years or a hundred thousand years later? Clearly none of our preserved human history that is recorded in the Library of Congress or wherever else on computers or in paper books, none of that survives. That's all gone.

GWFF:

Mm-hmm.

Gene:

The, the pyramids were made of very large stones. And granted that while limestone is not the most solid of stones, their, their sheer size meant that a, the outer layer could decay off and, and wash off with weather with the, the rain and things. And still there would be enough of the original stones surviving. What is the current civilization, the point that we're in going to leave behind if all the humans died tomorrow? Nothing. And what will be found?

GWFF:

no one left, would there,

Gene:

Well, there wouldn't be no left, but what would be found by the next time that there's intelligent life on the planet earth

GWFF:

Well, it wouldn't be there. It would be just total dust and it'd be gone by eating up by millions. Cause there's no consciousness there. So. It just, it feels like fast forwarding on a vhs, like when it's almost like a tree in the forest that falls. Does anybody hear it or see it if there's nobody there? No. But does that affect the fact that it's fallen in the forest and all that? The consciousness itself is tied to the, the act of time, like passing. So you could have millions and billions of years in a short space of time.

Gene:

Okay. But regardless of that, the, the question is what would that future civilization find left of us? And my point is nothing.

GWFF:

Yeah. Nothing. Of course not.

Gene:

And so how do we know that there haven't been dozens or hundreds or even thousands of previous civilizations on this very planet

GWFF:

Oh,

Gene:

we just don't have any evidence of finding?

GWFF:

Yeah. They're gone.

Gene:

We could be attempt number 2,854.

GWFF:

But that's, there's a Netflix show about this that's just come out in there. Like they've done their own

Gene:

I don't watch the pedophile channel.

GWFF:

Yeah. But yeah, but it's like, it's out there. It's just come out. It's a sort of a a sort of, what is it? A history channel thing, an ancient aliens thing

Gene:

Okay.

GWFF:

civilizations and everyone's talking about it. Like, oh, on, on the one hand they'll ban Rogan

Gene:

Yeah, Ancient aliens. I, I don't know if they're still going, but I mean, they've been go, they started 20 years ago.

GWFF:

People love it. It's, it's the same people that watch Info Wars. Watch ancient aliens.

Gene:

You like,

GWFF:

I think it's very close. Do you not think there'll be a, a big proportion? It'd be like the Venn diagram would,

Gene:

liberals that really like the the ancient alien.

GWFF:

Yeah. But I think a lot of people just afraid to, because they sense a majority and so they, they don't actually come up with their, If you talk to someone long enough, you always get a sense down in that this whole liberal, it's just another polarization thing. It's like everyone is everything at all times, and. Dial up the interest in one thing while dam dampening down the interest in another. I mean, that's why media and politics works hand in hand so that they can brainwash certain areas into vote in a certain way.

Gene:

Okay, but was that have to do with ancient alien?

GWFF:

Well, it's the same thing, isn't it? It's just like the, the information that they've been pumped into your brain that kind of comes out in a conversation that sort of forms the opinion of other people that speak to you. That that is that comes in through ancient aliens. And it's the same thing as politics. And it's just, or being a liberal, like if you're a liberal, there's, because there's another side to a liberal, there's the other side, right? You've got the two sides of the fence.

Gene:

Okay. I'm losing it. What, what other side to a liberal are you referring to?

GWFF:

Well, you've liberal. Being a liberal means that you are, If you were a fascist, I suppose you'd be the complete opposite to a liberal, wouldn't you? It's close enough, isn't it? Telling other people what to do.

Gene:

I mean, a liberal in my mind is essentially somebody that has a. And I, I, I, I understand that there, there's certainly a difference in terms between UK liberals, American liberals, and Australian liberals. Like each of those terms means a different thing. So I, I, I can certainly speak for the US one, I think much easier because I, I live with these folks all the time. But a, a us definition of a liberal is essentially somebody that believes in a communal decision making. Somebody that, that wants everything to be decided by a committee rather than an individual.

GWFF:

really?

Gene:

Yeah. It's, it's somebody that likes to give away individual rights in exchange for communal rights.

GWFF:

Like communism,

Gene:

well, not quite, I mean, communism, I think it is an extension of liberalism, but it goes much deeper.

GWFF:

just sort of the Venn diagram

Gene:

I don't like calling liberals, communis, or even socialists because those two terms have a specific meaning. Just like, I don't like hearing conservatives be called Nazis. Like that's not a Nazi, that's a different, Nazi has already what?

GWFF:

a national socialist?

Gene:

Yeah. Nazi was yeah, Nazi was the abbreviation of the National Socialist Party in Germany. But, but there's a, certainly a, a generic description of what a Nazi is that's evolved since that time. Like you said, the winners get to write history, and I think the winners got to decide what Nazi means, but the term is just thrown around very loosely right now, just for anybody that, somebody who is on the left side dislikes, who is to the right of them, not even necessarily conservative, but just somebody to the right of them. Quite often is labeled as a Nazi.

GWFF:

It's just straight up Nazi.

Gene:

People like Tim Poole, who was voting Democrat up until four years ago, are called Nazis on a routine basis.

GWFF:

Do you reckon that's cuz he wears the beanie?

Gene:

Well, he's wore the beanie a lot longer while he was voting Democrat than he has as a Republican. And he's not a Republican. And he repeats that on a regular basis too. It's like, look, I voted for Trump because he was an outsider to every party. There's nothing that says he's gonna vote Republican in the future, but yet he's considered a Nazi by a lot of

GWFF:

I think it's the optics. It's the

Gene:

three, four years ago were supporting him.

GWFF:

it's, it's gotta be the beanie. That beanie will make Anyone think that you're a Nazi after a while?

Gene:

I don't believe that Nazis wore beanies unless you have some imagery I'm not aware

GWFF:

I think the ones in Norway did when they were out in the cold.

Gene:

Norway was neutral.

GWFF:

Yeah, but when they had to guard the, cause it was still, there was still ones, there was action out in Norway.

Gene:

Well, there was, Yes, the England attacked Norway

GWFF:

Yeah.

Gene:

illegally.

GWFF:

Well, I mean, they, they went outside of their jurisdiction to

Gene:

Well, there was a neutral country.

GWFF:

Yes, I know, but they did. They, they still did it though, didn't they?

Gene:

absolutely. That's what I mean. I think World War II predominantly started by England. If you really look at the history of it

GWFF:

If you, Yeah, people in England, I hate to say it was attributed to a la, a

Gene:

well, Winston Churchill, if we wanna get specific

GWFF:

Well, I mean, yeah, that guy was such a evil drunkard, wasn't he? Just a terrible human

Gene:

there are people who are not evil, who are drunker as well. But in terms of, of politics and specifically getting getting both England initially and. A greater part of the western world into war that he was absolutely responsible for.

GWFF:

Yeah. He egged it on. He did what the current lot of doing with this stupid stuff in Ukraine.

Gene:

Yeah, that's exactly right. Yeah.

GWFF:

It's just a man who who fails to study history is doomed to repeat it.

Gene:

But you know that saying that I think somewhat ignores the fact that our people that study history and want to repeat it

GWFF:

Oh, good point. Yeah, it does, isn't it? Of course it does. Not as many of them though, as the others is there.

Gene:

well, they're usually the ones driving in Rolls Royces

GWFF:

Yeah. Or yeah. Other stuff. Those of

Gene:

or whatever vehicle of choice you can afford to. Yeah. But I, I don't know. I, I think that there's a there's, there's certainly. A lot of truths to the, what is considered conspiracy theories out there. But that's not to say that every conspiracy theory is true.

GWFF:

Oh, definitely not.

Gene:

And there are plenty of them and plenty on both sides of the aisle that are just, there, there are, they're absurd, but beyond absurd. They are much like you described playing Call of Duty. They're just time wasters.

GWFF:

Well, yeah, but I think call duty is feeding a machine of a data harvesting that is really working out the nitty gritty of the little robo dog warfare that's coming.

Gene:

Yeah, it glamorizes warfare for sure.

GWFF:

They're training up that AI with that though, right? They've gotta be.

Gene:

I don't know man. I think they're, they've been training. Male children with it for a very long time. And that's generally who's sent off to fight.

GWFF:

it, Yeah. And there's a lot of them in there.

Gene:

It's desen, Desen desensitizing combined with positive reinforcement techniques.

GWFF:

Totally. The little plus fifties plus the hundreds and

Gene:

The,

GWFF:

your emblem and all that.

Gene:

yeah, well you gotta make sure you get your unique challenge taken care of, get that, get that extra sticker.

GWFF:

See I never did any of that. I just ran around with the The first guy.

Gene:

Oh,

GWFF:

Yeah. I just felt it more interesting to win

Gene:

not a completionist, were you?

GWFF:

Oh no, I couldn't see like the whole prestige thing. I thought,

Gene:

Mm-hmm.

GWFF:

best of luck. That's not for me.

Gene:

Oh. Killing a guy with his own gun. You gotta get all those.

GWFF:

Oh, you can do that. But you do that for the funner stuff anyway, just cuz they've annoyed you.

Gene:

Yeah.

GWFF:

I mean, it's a little virtual space. And the thing is, is the, the, the physical spaces are being closed in you. Like young people can't actually hang out on streets legally cuz of a lot of overreaching jurisdiction laws about ASBOs and noise. And to be fair, young people are allowed and, and they do make noise. And, and, and you live on an island? Well, I live on an island full of like curtain twitches. Who would be like, Oh, who's that out there? Oh, don't like them outside my house. Oh no. Better call the police

Gene:

Well, do you think that's partly cuz you don't have much land?

GWFF:

Yeah, of course. A man is his castle, isn't it? Oh no. Home. A man's home is

Gene:

that, if those kids are two kilometers away from your curtains, would you even care? I don't mean you, but I mean a person.

GWFF:

Yeah, I think so. It depends how much you loved your kids,

Gene:

Eh, I think if you live in a, in a genuine castle with castle walls, you really don't care what the surfs and peasants are doing. I think it's the, it's the proximity factor, and this is where you can see a difference in voting patterns between people that live in high proximity areas like cities versus the country. Yeah. The density. And, and well, that, that's the density of the proximity to other humans.

GWFF:

Exactly. I always say when people say, We're overpopulated, I go, No, no, no, no, no. We're over densified. Huh? We're just, we're all packed in together. If we spread out a little more, we'd all be fine.

Gene:

and people do it voluntarily. That's the crazy part.

GWFF:

Yeah. And they do it long term anyway. I mean, that's just how it goes,

Gene:

I mean that, I think right now some people are realizing that it's better to move further away and have fewer neighbors and have a larger property that is your. Than to pay the exact same amount of money and live in downtown San Francisco

GWFF:

yeah.

Gene:

or New York. Or London, or you pick a city

GWFF:

yeah. It's just a, Yeah. Silly.

Gene:

and, and this idea that, well, but the cities are so much better. You have everything available at whim. You can go to a play, you can go to musical performance. You could do all these things that you can't do in the country. Well, you, you can, but should you is the real question.

GWFF:

I dunno. I think it's not for everyone is it? But the way that they're going, they're trying to fill these cities as fast as they can whilst keeping it nice and thin on the outside.

Gene:

Yeah. But I think also people in the cities they have to go to see a play and, and, and watch musical performances and go to many different restaurants. Because that literally is all there is. They're devoid of the experiences that humanities had for millions of years, which include nature.

GWFF:

Yeah.

Gene:

you're not having to be in nature and deal with nature, you get bored. And to prevent that boredom from coming on, we as humans invent entertainment.

GWFF:

Exactly. We come up with it.

Gene:

Yeah. With that whole concept. And this is why, again, I come back to this idea of like, why the hell actors are considered important by any stretch of the imagination is insane. The, these are entertainers much like, sports is entertainment. Much, much like anything that takes a natural natural human emotional drive and then replicates it through a human created form. People get excited and I, I can probably generalize men, but it doesn't have to be men. And when watching a football game, for example, and it doesn't even matter if it's American football or European football,

GWFF:

Any

Gene:

The excitement is there, right? I think a little less exciting watching golf, but but certainly some,

GWFF:

tennis, you get a neck cake,

Gene:

tennis could be interesting. I, my personal sport of choice well, I like a number of 'em, but they're generally winter sports. But I like curling. I like by athlon. But either way, the reason that sports exists, the reason that we're willing to do nothing and just watch other people doing something competitive

GWFF:

Doing

Gene:

is because, because we're removed from having to do things that challenge ourselves by not living in nature.

GWFF:

Yes,

Gene:

A man whose survival depends on his ability to get things done during the day in order to survive in the country, does not have time. Like people who live in cities have time to be entertained.

GWFF:

But then someone that lives in a city doesn't have the time that someone in the country's got to spend with their day. Everything's more high pressure in a such a, you've gotta pay your rent, you've gotta pay this. You've got your economic

Gene:

But I That's, yeah, I mean, that's what I'm saying. It's a trade off. So when, when we don't have nature induced stress, we create human induced stress.

GWFF:

Yes, but manifest it. You mean outta nothing

Gene:

Well, it's, Yeah. I mean, manifest creates same thing. It's a we're, we're not willing to live lives without stress. We're gonna have stress, whether it's manmade or

GWFF:

a stock, stock home syndrome, stress.

Gene:

Yeah. And, and it's Stockholm syndrome being essentially a desire for something that is a negative aspect with that is outside of your means and being drawn toward it. Much like the a kidnapping victim who ends up being sympathetic to the kidnappers while being captive.

GWFF:

That's where, that's where that comes from. But it's, that's kind of what we've got with the stress re reaction. And I think if you can, if

Gene:

because we're built for it. We,

GWFF:

you can live without it, it's much, isn't it? You'd live

Gene:

But that's the thing I think, I don't think humans are capable of living without stress. I think this is, whether you wanna look at it as intelligent designer, we wanna look at his evolution for however long people have been, people they've had to deal with the stress of nature. It's only within the last several hundred years that we've been able to remove a lot of those stresses.

GWFF:

yeah. We're getting

Gene:

we're not, we're not designed to live without stress. Our systems require stress in order to actually function. And so we create stress.

GWFF:

Yes. People do create their own drama, don't they? They love it.

Gene:

Well, it's not just drama. Why do people start working out when they live in the city? Because they don't get enough exercise that you would if you were living in the country. And if you don't get enough of that exercise, your body starts to deteriorate because it's not designed to live without that physical stress. And in the same way, it's not designed to live without other types of stress.

GWFF:

The emotional or economic whatever.

Gene:

is input into our computers. And if you don't have any input, then you're not gonna have any. And this is why immortality sucks. I appreciate you being on today's podcast. I've thoroughly enjoyed the conversation. Hopefully you did as well.

GWFF:

too. Yeah, it was great.

Gene:

Any, anything else to call out any other podcasts or other things you mentioned you were maybe doing some music that you wanna

GWFF:

Yeah. I do gu, just a GW FFF at no social. And I hang out on jt see most nights, just right in and chatting and build in stuff on the internet. The beautiful digital kingdom that we've got going here. sure it keeps happening and to, to be participating in it seems to be, makes the most sense to me at this stage. I mean, having had a look at the other lot, the mainstream media, it seems a no brainer not to do podcasts like this. So yeah, it's lovely. Love to have a chat. I'll always do it.

Gene:

Very good. And with that, we will catch you next week.