Sir Gene Speaks

0086 Sir Gene Speaks with Dude Named Ben

September 26, 2022 Gene Naftulyev Season 2022 Episode 86
Sir Gene Speaks
0086 Sir Gene Speaks with Dude Named Ben
Show Notes Transcript

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Weekend Gaming Livestream atlasrandgaming onTwitch
StarCitizen referral code STAR-YJD6-DKF2
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Kerbal

Podcast recorded on Descript and hosted on BuzzSprout

Story Images and Links are only visible to Podcasting 2.0 Apps - see all the latest APPS for Podcasting 2.0

If you have comments drop them to Gene at
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Sir Gene:

Hey, this is sir Jean and joining me once again is so dude named Ben named Ben named Ben, how are you today?

Sir Ben:

I'm alright, man. I got a little bit of a cold, but I'm good.

Sir Gene:

Oh, you sound a little under the weather. You're not your usual kinda upbeat self.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I just woke up this morning with a stuffed up nose and a sore throat. So, you know,

Sir Gene:

Ooh, COVID

Sir Ben:

eh, I already had it not worried about it.

Sir Gene:

probably COVID. Oh, Macron.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Okay.

Sir Gene:

Oh

Sir Ben:

afraid. Be very,

Sir Gene:

Well, you don't have to be afraid as long as you went and got your 14th booster shot last week, did you,

Sir Ben:

yeah, no, I did

Sir Gene:

oh, you

Sir Ben:

But the hilarious part was on the slack at work.

Sir Gene:

The company that shall not be mentioned

Sir Ben:

yes. Yes. But there were some people that were like, this was the worst one yet. slack like you and some of these people do risk analysis for their living and it's like, this is not, this is not a smart person. This is this. They have lost all.

Sir Gene:

You know, there's a website I think. And there's definitely a bunch of videos with the hashtag people of Walmart.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

I think you're getting them close to the,

Sir Ben:

people of COVID.

Sir Gene:

thing. Yeah. People of co well, people of whatever X company that shall not be named. And little clips of the messages flying back for man. I, I could, I've seen quite a few of 'em from Amazon that an anonymous buddy of mine has shared that, you know, are floating through there and it's like, Jesus, this is beyond just people living in a different universe. These are, these are people that are living inside of a black hole where no light gets in at all. It is completely dark and they cannot see outside of the what do you call it? The

Sir Ben:

the event, horizon

Sir Gene:

the word I was looking for? Exactly. Yeah. It's like, they're, they're gonna be PERMA stuck in 2019 for the rest of their lives.

Sir Ben:

Uhhuh.

Sir Gene:

I even saw somebody wearing a mask the other day. Holy

Sir Ben:

Oh, dude. I saw several Y tomorrow, yesterday,

Sir Gene:

Wow. But my little air owned gas station here just took down their plastic barriers that they put up for COVID

Sir Ben:

so like,

Sir Gene:

Uhhuh. I, I, I only mentioned the fact that it's air owned because they gouge you for price all the time.

Sir Ben:

okay. Why do you

Sir Gene:

not trying to be racist or anything, just, you know, that's the only reason I mention it.

Sir Ben:

so last week was this week of misogyny. This is gonna be this week in racism.

Sir Gene:

well, Hey man, it's your show too. You do whatever you do, whatever you want.

Sir Ben:

by the way, I now own this weekend, Mr.

Sir Gene:

Oh

Sir Ben:

people of, well, people of mRNA rather, sorry.

Sir Gene:

this week in people, what?

Sir Ben:

people of mRNA instead of people of, yeah.

Sir Gene:

people have always, so you literally just got it.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Oh, nice. Okay. Not, not as funny as people of COVID, but okay.

Sir Ben:

I, well, I thought mRNA was more

Sir Gene:

Something, no one would ever type in, but sure. Okay. Yeah. Yeah, no, I get it. Yeah, that's good. That's good. So lots of things happening.

Sir Ben:

just a few, including some assassination attempts.

Sir Gene:

Oh, I don't know anything about that. I don't watch news, but lots of things happening other than that one thing that I mentioned to you specifically, so I wouldn't forget it, cuz I just found it to be so profound and I don't like forgetting profound things. I was in an event this week where there's a bunch of rich and famous people and things. And I have no idea why I was there, but the one, one of the people presenting said something extremely profound, at least I found profound. And that I've never heard anybody else say, but is absolutely true.

Sir Ben:

profound enough to send to me

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And after the commercial break, we'll let you know what that is. Just kidding. Just kidding. We're not gonna put a commercial break in this early. So, the profound thing was he said people don't don't build affinity groups that you don't become a part of a group because you agree on something, you become a part of a group, a really strong affinity group, a group that is much stronger than simply your interests based around common things you disagree with other people about. So in a sense, I guess you are agreeing with the people in the group. It'd be pretty weird to be in a group where you all disagreed all the time, but the thing that makes a group strong, isn't a common interest in something, it is a common disinterest or dislike of something,

Sir Ben:

and, and I think this is fairly well known because said differently. The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

Sir Gene:

right? Well, I think that's one of the outcomes of this type of in, in mean human behavior. Something that is built into us is that we, we are much like chemically. Which is what our feelings are. We are much stronger. We have stronger feelings when we gather around a common enemy, a common dislike than when we just simply gather around a common interest. So the example I used is, you know, I have something in common with people that own guns which is how many 400 million guns in the country. So probably somewhere around 80 million to a hundred million people, own guns, most people own more than one. Once you go, once you get one gun, you end up getting more.

Sir Ben:

generally, that's

Sir Gene:

well I do like usually one a week,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. You buy more guns than me. Okay.

Sir Gene:

I don't know about that. You'd never sell your guns. I sell mine when I get bored with them.

Sir Ben:

Oh, I, I definitely have more guns than you. I'm saying you buy more than me.

Sir Gene:

Oh, well see, now that some people would say that's a logical fallacy there. You can't have more if I buy more or you're saying you steal your guns. Oh, I get it. You're trying to be like, not politically correct than that one. Okay.

Sir Ben:

no, I'm saying you anyway. You, you, you sell you, you trade, you, you go through the entire commerce circle mean not so much, but I, I think that's actually gonna change, but we'll talk about that later.

Sir Gene:

okay, cool. Yeah, I think I sold a couple guns this week too, but Not at arm's merchant or, or anything like that. Mind you just private party,

Sir Ben:

Nothing to do with the Vegas at all

Sir Gene:

Nothing. What's one. I don't even know what's in Vegas.

Sir Ben:

Where he carried 23 rifles and 15,000 rounds of ammo to his room by himself

Sir Gene:

oh, that was, yeah, that, that was definitely a sale gun. Wrong. All

Sir Ben:

Oh, 100%.

Sir Gene:

were there. Yeah. That had nothing to do with the kinda crazy planned activity shooting.

Sir Ben:

Nope. That was, that was an arm tail combat.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Yeah,

Sir Gene:

and as a result, the fucking casinos, now won't let you bring a gun in,

Sir Ben:

really?

Sir Gene:

ridiculous. Have you not seen this, this, this thing

Sir Ben:

I don't go to Vegas.

Sir Gene:

No. Yeah. So now they, most,

Sir Ben:

off a long time ago and I've never been back

Sir Gene:

no, most of the, what was the, what was her name?

Sir Ben:

It? It was called a flight delayed and being stuck in Vegas for over 24 hours

Sir Gene:

oh God, the horror, the horror of being stuck in the capital of adult

Sir Ben:

Yes, it sucks.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Oh, you were under 21. Oh, well that would suck you. Haven't been to Vegas since you were under 21. Oh, dude, I need to take you on the bachelor party. Listen to these podcasts.

Sir Ben:

Nope. She does not.

Sir Gene:

Okay, good. let's make a plan.

Sir Ben:

I've tried to get her to, so, you know, Hey Hey baby. I tried to tell you. Yeah, that's

Sir Gene:

was right there. We talked about it. What are you talking about? plane for anyone. I mean, we had thousands of people listening to this plan Uhhuh

Sir Ben:

Gene's trying to get me shot, you know, it's okay.

Sir Gene:

Mildly. But I, I do think that there is a lot, a lot of truth there that you know, your, your, group around collecting trinkets or baseball cards or Bitcoins or whatever you have is an interest group, your group of pro second amendment buddies that are tracking all the legislation and news coming out about the ATF. And the, the thing you actually contribute money. The thing that you're actually a life member of these are more around what you oppose, which in this example, and it's not the only thing I, I oppose a whole bunch of stuff, but in this particular example, that would be any kind of government encroachment or anybody's encroachment for that manner on our second amendment rights.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, what I think that comes down to is the discuss refl. So this is something that. Conservatives have a lot more of is the discussed reflex of, oh, you're the other, right? You're the person opposing or doing something different than what I consider the normal. And yeah. It's I, I don't

Sir Gene:

have more. You mean the liberals have more,

Sir Ben:

no, no, no, no. Conservative by definition, the more conservative you are, the higher your discuss reflexes.

Sir Gene:

well, that used to be maybe in some past life, the definition, but the people that are most disgusted with other people doing things differently these days are liberals, not conservatives. Conservatives just wanna let people live and that live. And you

Sir Ben:

yeah. Well,

Sir Gene:

me what to do. I don't tell you what to

Sir Ben:

don't we?

Sir Gene:

I don't tell you what to do. You, you don't tell me what to do. We're all fine and happy

Sir Ben:

So what

Sir Gene:

the liberals want to enforce a homogeny

Sir Ben:

the current liberals are really

Sir Gene:

socialists.

Sir Ben:

well. And fascists taking that conservative moniker up of you will be like us, or you will not be,

Sir Gene:

I think they've always, I think that term's always been screwed up because liberals forever have preached this idea that. We can't change the climate. We, we should preserve things exactly in the state. They are right now ignoring the fact that in the history of this planet, and even in the history of humans being on this planet the, the variety of average temperatures, the amount of CO2 in the oxygen has varied drastically, but yet somehow magically today is the perfect golden day to preserve for eternity in all aspects of what the planet earth should look like. We should stop using fossil fuels. They should be left in the earth and preserved ho and that's a liberal idea. So don't tell me, conservatives are the ones that, that want to freeze things in when they are, and the liberals are open to new

Sir Ben:

I don't necessarily mean political party. I mean, attitude I'm speaking psychologically there. So, here, here's the problem I have with a couple of things. There is conservation. Sure. Preservation. No.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I think no, to both of those, frankly,

Sir Ben:

I,

Sir Gene:

I don't wanna conserve coal or gas or oil or anything else. I want to use it because we have always adapted to new sources of fuel as technologies advance. Nobody wanted oil 200 years ago because it couldn't be readily utilized.

Sir Ben:

Fair enough, but I, I think being a good steward and using it wisely is a point that said, you know, this idea that we're at peak oil or anything else is absolutely insane. You know, people say, oh, well that we're, we're running at oil really. Have you done that, that titration math, because what it comes down to is last time I checked, there's still life on this earth. E even if you believe in the fossil fuel model. And I tend to think that there is such thing as abiotic oil, but we're not gonna get into that right now. Even if you think that that the fossil fuel model is accurate, what you have is you have life on this earth, you have plants, things dying, generating new oil at the same time. So, you know what I remember from my physics classes was the old bathtub experiment. You got water coming in and water going out. What's the titration, right? You in until you know that you can't say we're running out of oil. You can't yet people

Sir Gene:

but even if we

Sir Ben:

all the time.

Sir Gene:

why the hell would that mean that we shouldn't use it?

Sir Ben:

Well, even if we are, it's not like it's a, a finite defined resource. There's always new oil. There's always new stuff being generated. I did.

Sir Gene:

yeah. And advancement in technology. And before too long, I don't know exactly when, but at some point. In fact, we would have the technology. People are just too stupid to use it right now. And by people. I mean, politicians is nuclear. If we went full nuclear, guess what? We don't need oil because nuclear is gonna be more efficient.

Sir Ben:

You still need oil oil.

Sir Gene:

Well, for plastic. Sure.

Sir Ben:

plastics gas.

Sir Gene:

as a fuel

Sir Ben:

Absolutely. There's nothing more dense than gasoline. We do not have a fuel that, well, I mean, we have jet fuel. We have things like that, but I

Sir Gene:

hold up, hold up, hold up. Uranium is absolutely more dense in terms

Sir Ben:

yeah. You're gonna put a fishing reactor in your car.

Sir Gene:

man. I wanna be flying around and making little noise, like Jetsons, like P

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, George was supposedly born this year,

Sir Gene:

yeah. Now let's so there you go. History's already, already been written sometime in the next 20 years. There'll be little miniature flying cars with lots of glass.

Sir Ben:

but you can shoot your white F out of

Sir Gene:

Shoot your wifi. I don't remember that episode. What episode?

Sir Ben:

No, in, in the, in, in the entire startup, they, he shoots him out in little pods, right?

Sir Gene:

It doesn't shoot them out. They, they jet us in the way. Jesus man. You and your gun metaphors,

Sir Ben:

okay.

Sir Gene:

kinda hillbilly redneck here.

Sir Ben:

Well he is just two good old boys. We can.

Sir Gene:

Huh. Exactly. So this is once again, searching speaks, because once again, we're not quite ready. We're getting there. We get the artwork pretty much mostly

Sir Ben:

the artwork, but gene

Sir Gene:

seen the final version or approved it, so yeah. Perfect is good.

Sir Ben:

everything.

Sir Gene:

I'm pretty sure I need to approve things. That's how, that's how this works,

Sir Ben:

it's not how this works.

Sir Gene:

Uhhuh. But you know, that's all right. I'm, I'm willing to lend the, this podcast to the cause for one more episode

Sir Ben:

Hopefully.

Sir Gene:

and before I can finally move on and do important things,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So we had two assassination attempts apparently

Sir Gene:

had not heard about this, cuz I don't watch these what's going on.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So it was, Zelensky had apparently a car run into his motorcade

Sir Gene:

I thought he ran somebody off the road.

Sir Ben:

dude, the, the story goes back and forth. It's hilarious cuz it's obviously bullshit.

Sir Gene:

Does drive after using Coke. That's a prin fact.

Sir Ben:

well, okay. So he, it might take on the whole Linsky thing is after what happened to Putin, this was a, oh look, we're gonna cover shit up because I think the attack on Putin was actually much more

Sir Gene:

okay. What, what happened to Putin? I haven't heard of this.

Sir Ben:

There's an explosive device that detonated near his motor.

Sir Gene:

Oh my God.

Sir Ben:

While he was on the way to meet G in

Sir Gene:

Wow. Yeah, that sounds very

Sir Ben:

but yeah.

Sir Gene:

Hm

Sir Ben:

So, and he apparently still made it, still made the meeting, but I, I think,

Sir Gene:

that.

Sir Ben:

well, I think the us intelligence contingent, and we'll say secret police, whatever you wanna call 'em made an attempt. I think we actually made a legitimate attempt and failed.

Sir Gene:

well, I mean, we have a history of doing this. Us has assassinated more leaders in the world than any other country.

Sir Ben:

Absolutely. And a, but I I'm just saying, I think that when we made that attempt and failed, I don't know why, but I, I think as a distraction, I guess, or as a moral statement, they did a little play with Zelensky, but I, I don't really buy the Zelensky one.

Sir Gene:

Hmm. Yeah. I thought Zelensky was just drunk driving or, hopped up on Coke, driving

Sir Ben:

I don't think drunk driving would be his thing. Coke. Sure.

Sir Gene:

Coke. Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. Yeah, I didn't know about on these two.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

See, there you go. Just goes, show you that you don't really need to pay attention to the news. You just need to listen to a podcast.

Sir Ben:

Don't do that. Don't do that.

Sir Gene:

Why not? That's why I do.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Be just you need to pay more attention.

Sir Gene:

Do you though?

Sir Ben:

yeah, actually I

Sir Gene:

does it make? What difference in your life has it made from either one of these two situations?

Sir Ben:

So what I would say is podcasts are fine places to get information in lots of ways, but I, I hope everyone is paying attention and being active. I mean, I'll take the stock market on Tuesday and everything else. When you compare the S and P 500 to today to 2008, it is very, very eerily similar when you look at those graphs.

Sir Gene:

what happened in 2008?

Sir Ben:

were you living under a rock gene?

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I was in Minnesota back then.

Sir Ben:

So bailouts, too big to fail

Sir Gene:

Oh yeah. Yeah. Bad government run by Democrats. Oh, I see what you mean. Yeah, I guess it was just like that.

Sir Ben:

it, it looks eerily similar. Does it not? And we, I think we're right ready for that drop off. I mean, it.

Sir Gene:

Been ready for a while. I mean, Tim's been calling for civil war for a while now.

Sir Ben:

Well, and I think he's getting close to, right. So what we have is we have what I see as an impending economic crisis. We have multiple political crises on the forefront and we have ethical dilemmas really divide us into separate nations. So yeah,

Sir Gene:

yeah, no, that's definitely coming. And just from kind of thinking back to this event that I was at the the people with the money right now are all about buying land as more and more housing becomes foreclosed.

Sir Ben:

well it's non fungible.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, exactly. It's not a fake, it's not a fake investment unlike money.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Did you see Tim's video about the teacher in Canada?

Sir Gene:

No, dude. I've been at an event I've been disconnected. I haven't been paying attention to any news. Tell me about it.

Sir Ben:

So apparently there is a teacher in, I, I I'll have to go back and look, but I believe it's Ontario that has decided to transition largely presents as male, but has decided to wear press forms into class that are like, 50 something F just.

Sir Gene:

What

Sir Ben:

Enormous ridiculous.

Sir Gene:

clown jugs,

Sir Ben:

huh?

Sir Gene:

clown jugs.

Sir Ben:

Yes, exactly. And a very tight shirt showing the nipple and everything through and the school can't do anything about it.

Sir Gene:

why,

Sir Ben:

Cause they're trans because it's protected class

Sir Gene:

what? It may be protected, but you should be able to make 'em more at Berker then.

Sir Ben:

dude, I'm just telling you it, it is the

Sir Gene:

Yeah, Canada's got insane. I mean, this was pretty obvious when they reelected Justin inau

Sir Ben:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Well look, I, and here here's what I'll say. I, I have known people in my life that I work with that are transitioning, that I knew as one thing as, as another. And it's one of those things that I don't agree with you. I don't necessarily like it. But if you're making an effort to present as whatever,

Sir Gene:

sure. Bluff cup.

Sir Ben:

then I'll call you whatever. Right? Like buck angel or what's the other one?

Sir Gene:

The other one. Blair white Blair white.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. There you go. Blair white. I, I would never use he to refer to Blair

Sir Gene:

Oh, no. Blair is definitely a chick.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. It, the, the, the presentation is such that, it, it, it just wouldn't be practical. Not even from a moral standpoint, it just wouldn't be practical. If I go, Hey, that guy over there, people would be like, huh. Right.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Same thing with buck angel. So that's one thing. But when you're doing what this teacher in Canada is doing is just an absurdity.

Sir Gene:

yeah. Now I, I just watched a video of a skinny balded white dude doing a series of videos. He's on day 30 after transitioning to African American and and he's getting all kinds of hatred for it, of course.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

And apparently Charlaine the God or whatever the guy's name is the rapper ke watched his dude's video and came to his defense and saying, you know, the only reason this, this man who's transitioning is getting all this hatred is because now he's presenting as black. And that's a great point. it's, it's, it's all the liberals that hate black people so much. Even when somebody's not natively black, but has transitioned to being black, that they immediately just start hating

Sir Ben:

Yeah, so we can go one of two ways on this

Sir Gene:

be hating.

Sir Ben:

Do you wanna go to Martha's vineyard or do you

Sir Gene:

Oh yeah, let's do that. That's a funny one.

Sir Ben:

They're both funny.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

So Martha's Martha's vineyard

Sir Gene:

one I have heard, I got a little clip of this yesterday. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

So DeSantis sends 50 migrants to,

Sir Gene:

He doesn't send, he provides free transportation.

Sir Ben:

enough. Yes. And the fucking world lands up there. It's hilarious. The governor calls in the national guard.

Sir Gene:

other than in the garden.

Sir Ben:

Exactly. The, the governor calls in the national guard, they

Sir Gene:

Oh my God. You're kidding. I didn't hear that part of it.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And they, they ended up relocating the migrants to a base.

Sir Gene:

they get there. Right? And the Twitter stream is all about the hatred of DeSantis

Sir Ben:

Yes. Literally moving trash from room to

Sir Gene:

that's, it gets to that if you're jumping ahead. So it starts from them. Just condemning him about being in humane for loading people onto an air conditioned bus. We just sat on a boat for four

Sir Ben:

Actually a charter flight, but

Sir Gene:

Well, whatever. Anyway, point being they're comfortable enough, right? No one is hauling them off in handcuffs up. And and then this, this series of tweets goes from stupid to insane. As the comparisons are made to what you just mentioned. Somebody said, you know, Santa saying, think these people are here is just like me taking my trash out and then just leaving it. My neighbor's driveway hold up. So you're calling these people that you're supposed to be allegedly you

Sir Ben:

a sanctuary city, it's a sanctuary

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. It's a century state.

Sir Ben:

Yes.

Sir Gene:

Well, you're supposed to be all caring for these poor migrants who are trying to make a better life. Just not just not on my fucking island.

Sir Ben:

Exactly.

Sir Gene:

The hypocrisy on the left is, is beyond count.

Sir Ben:

well, the health and human services secretary director for the county, whatever said that they didn't have enough affordable housing to,

Sir Gene:

Well, they should build some.

Sir Ben:

Oh no, no, no. So Tim made a great point. He went on Airbnb

Sir Gene:

There you

Sir Ben:

at.

Sir Gene:

Yeah,

Sir Ben:

The open available housing that was

Sir Gene:

yeah, yeah,

Sir Ben:

Hilarious dude DeSantis. This was an awesome, awesome job. Th this was this, this was a master stroke in the culture war. Now not to be outdone. Abbott did something as well.

Sir Gene:

He did Chicago, right? No. What else?

Sir Ben:

So Abbott sent a bus of migrants to DC

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Sir Ben:

and he dropped them off in front of the residents of the vice president.

Sir Gene:

Oh, perfect. Yeah. Yeah. That's good. The, the woman that's been to the border once for 10 minutes for a photo up.

Sir Ben:

and anyway, it, it, both of these are just master strokes in trolling. They really are.

Sir Gene:

I'm I'm glad that there are finally people that work for these administrations that have the, the balls to bring up ideas like this.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Cause I, in the past I guarantee people would've thought this would be hilarious, but no one would dare mention this as a real idea.

Sir Ben:

well, but I think it goes back to we're getting to a crisis point, right? So the more absurd is more okay. Whether it's the teacher or anything else. We're we're we are in a cultural crisis point and

Sir Gene:

done gun insane

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

that north has done gun insane.

Sir Ben:

Well,

Sir Gene:

have you look at Canada as the furthest north and they're the most insane

Sir Ben:

this is true. This is true.

Sir Gene:

Boston and Chicago, and I mean, for Christ's sake, Portland and Seattle come on,

Sir Ben:

yeah, but you got Idaho

Sir Gene:

insane.

Sir Ben:

You got Montana, you've got South Dakota, North Dakota,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Well, that's almost part of

Sir Ben:

other than Jackson

Sir Gene:

is part of Texas.

Sir Ben:

used

Sir Gene:

We need to get it bad. Oh, it used to be bullshit outta be

Sir Ben:

we sold it off, but it, you know, you know, up

Sir Gene:

though, did we though, or did we just get tricked into that kinda like Alaska was never officially sold. There is no documentation. There is no proof.

Sir Ben:

There's documentation. On the Texas side, we sold it off. I mean, this is a sovereign debt issue. So Texas after the revolution was a independent nation for a period of time. Dan, well, still should be. But we were coerced into joining the union and during the civil war, the Texas succession the declaration of the succession is very poignant in saying, Hey, we were a free and independent nation. We don't need this shit. Paraphrasing obviously, but Texas sold off a lot of land to enter the union debt free. We are the only state. To enter the union debt free. We are one of two countries to join the union us in Hawaii.

Sir Gene:

Hawaii never joined the union. Hawaii was stolen. It was stolen illegally with no documentation, much like Alaska. This is just typical imperialism on the United States.

Sir Ben:

You know, there was a point made the other day that I really liked. We are not in the empire phase yet. We're still in the Republic phase, however,

Sir Gene:

Tim so much. You watched Tim so much.

Sir Ben:

I ha dude, this week

Sir Gene:

know exactly where this came from.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But I, I, I, I like the point

Sir Gene:

yeah. Yeah. That we're that we have, we're wrapping up the Republic phase of Rome and entering the empire phase of Rome.

Sir Ben:

and

Sir Gene:

where all the debauchery happened during the empire phase.

Sir Ben:

we have something to look forward to I, no, I, I, I, I think that this conflict that is about to pop with China. So for a while I was worried that, oh, world war, three's gonna start over in Ukraine. Fuck. No it's gonna be over Taiwan,

Sir Gene:

Nah, no one gives shit about Taiwan.

Sir Ben:

dude. We are about to send a billion dollars worth of armament to Taiwan.

Sir Gene:

And how many billions have we sent to Ukraine?

Sir Ben:

Okay. Doesn't matter. You think

Sir Gene:

80, 80 billion.

Sir Ben:

there is a difference. There's a big difference. China considers that their territory, their property they're they own it.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Except that Taiwan's been out of China for longer than Ukraine's been out of Russia.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But we are literally arming the revels to China.

Sir Gene:

You could literally replace the word China with Ukraine in that sentence. That would still be true.

Sir Ben:

No. So there there's a bit of a difference. So Russia, the Dom bass, they have strategic interests. They're, I do not see Russia as the evil empire that I see China as I think there are

Sir Gene:

you this question. If China right now was capitalist in the United States was socialist, but the same issue was still there in that Taiwan aligned itself with the us and China was just, their capitalist. So they'll do whatever, but their politics are different than ours. Would you still think the same thing? Is it the communism in China or really the social. That you have an issue with, or is it you just hate people? Slant eyes.

Sir Ben:

Well, you know, the slant I thing.

Sir Gene:

Well, that's why I figured

Sir Ben:

Actually there's a whole story there. We'll get into at some point in time, but no, it is the communism. It is the it is, the history is the way I perceive that China Taiwan. So first of all, the, the rulers that were overthrown during MAs revolution fled to Taiwan, they held 'em off. They, they created their own nation up until Nixon's, which Nixon and Carter, Nixon Ford and Carter could, we have had three worst presidents in a row.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Anyway. Before that, we, we recognized Taiwan as the seat of power, which we corrected that. But instead of saying one China policy, we should have said, okay, there's Taiwan and there's China. There are two separate, independent

Sir Gene:

but you know why we didn't Because the fuckers in Taiwan? No, because the fuckers in Taiwan refused to concede the loss of China.

Sir Ben:

Yep.

Sir Gene:

They maintain that they're still in charge of China. They just aren't in charge of China.

Sir Ben:

Well, both factions need to. Realize the reality a hundred percent, but regardless. So Taiwan was used by the Japanese when during, before world war II, even even broke out when the sign Japanese war Japan took over Taiwan and used it as quote unquote, the unsinkable aircraft carrier to raid China. So there there's just a lot of seated, deep, deep stuff between China and Taiwan.

Sir Gene:

yeah,

Sir Ben:

I think that USC sending those armaments, I don't think that $1 billion is gonna kick off the war. But what I do think is, w with Ukraine, we don't have public involvement of us troops with Taiwan. We literally have submarines sitting off the coast.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

That's a big difference. That's all I'm saying.

Sir Gene:

so proxy, war versus potential real war.

Sir Ben:

Exactly.

Sir Gene:

The us has so much to lose in this. And of course, this is the administration that likes to lose things. So maybe they will do something stupid.

Sir Ben:

Well, I think here's the, the, the thing the intelligence agencies do not want to see a multipolar world. So they're basically taking a last gasp, but here's the thing. I would rather take a multipolar world where we have China as a new U SSR. And we go back to a cold war que mentality that I think we can win in the long term versus shooting ourselves in the foot.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, so I, I think, and I've said this many times before, and it's, it's unfortunately true of, of the us the most, but the west in general is there's a tremendous misunderstanding in the west of China and Chinese culture. And that means Chinese politics as well. There's also a huge misunderstanding in the west of Russia and its culture and its politics. And I've tried to bring a little bit more insight into the Russian side on these podcasts for two years now. Yeah, yeah. Right. I love how I'm the heat and Nelson.

Sir Ben:

I mean, you are pretty hedonistic in a lot of ways.

Sir Gene:

well he then, or Heden

Sir Ben:

He.

Sir Gene:

different words.

Sir Ben:

Similar roots, same

Sir Gene:

Nah, I don't think so.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Hedonistic comes from being a heathen.

Sir Gene:

No, it doesn't. No, it doesn't hiddenness is a Greek word and he then is not a Greek word. It's a different route.

Sir Ben:

go on.

Sir Gene:

Go on. Fine. So my point is that there's a an American perspective that taints the reality of the rest of the world when, when different decisions by the rest of the world are perceived by the us. And it's, I'm not sure exactly why it's there. I mean, I have some ideas, I guess, but I, I can't categorically say why the us seems to be the most color blind in this regard because a, a lot of other countries understand each other. And this is where stereotypes come from, right? This is where the, the, the, the Jews sitting and counting his money comes from right. It's because certain countries develop a reputation. Jews are good bankers. They're good accountants. They're people that are accurate with money. So the, the, that image is based on positive aspects within the culture, but portrayed negatively. And that's what stereotypes always are.

Sir Ben:

well, and here's the thing. So when you look at IQ and you look at the race angles of

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

are definitely Jews typically have higher IQs. There's a whole thing. So this is not the white supremacy broadcast. This is, something else. But what, what I'll say is it, usery is a thing and the reason why bankers and you can put whatever race you want in there are hated is because of USRI. And what it comes down to is in my side of things. And the way I see things is there's a big difference in the Jews pre the destruction of the temple and post when, the Torah is fine. There's another document that I think is, you know, that was written in Babylon while they're in exile that I take issue with, you know, when you say that a a go can be used in a natural fashion and that be fine. I take issue with that, which by the way, go means human kettle.

Sir Gene:

well, it's just unanointed

Sir Ben:

No, no, no. go is a very derogatory term used to anyone who is not Jewish,

Sir Gene:

it, it really isn't. It's I, I think that's a mischaracterization.

Sir Ben:

really. Okay.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I.

Sir Ben:

go on

Sir Gene:

Well, in Islam you have very similar kind of directions on how to interact with people who are not of the Muslim faith.

Sir Ben:

and, and Mormonism as well, which I would take all three as you know, perversions of something else.

Sir Gene:

And, and so the witch trials and the Spanish inquisition, those are all fine.

Sir Ben:

No, not at all.

Sir Gene:

All right. I, I think Christianity has absolutely nothing to stand on when it comes to any kind of derogatory aspect of other cultures or other religions. There's been more people killed in the name of the Christian God than any other God.

Sir Ben:

I don't know that that's true.

Sir Gene:

Now we can look it up. So, but you were talking about usually, and one of the, one of the

Sir Ben:

the,

Sir Gene:

commandments in the Torah is that every seven years that that debts are forgiven

Sir Ben:

Right. My, my point was it doesn't matter what religion is in that position, that that's gonna be the hated person. And when you have an inordinate amount of people taking up certain positions that goes back to that

Sir Gene:

no, yeah, totally. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

are the problem. No, there's the systematic problem.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And that's, I mean, everybody dislikes people who are different than them.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

And I think this is a natural part of human evolution is that if, if you end up not having your guard up, when a stranger shows up, you may well be taken advantage of,

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

by the way, the word go means nation.

Sir Ben:

Goam.

Sir Gene:

Well, that that's a plural of go.

Sir Ben:

Okay. And it means human cattle.

Sir Gene:

No, it doesn't not at all, dude. That's just some Christian bullshit lies. Yeah. So, I mean, look, dictionaries have been around for a while. Not that hard to look up.

Sir Ben:

Well,

Sir Gene:

yeah. Yeah. You, you need to, you need to get get some learning going here. It, I mean, dude, seriously, just Google it. You'll see. You know, the. What else are we talking about? We're talking about you being antic. What else

Sir Ben:

I'm re I'm really not. So, you know, what it comes down to is I, I, one of my

Sir Gene:

you even have any Jewish friends?

Sir Ben:

yeah. One of my roommates in college was Jewish. He wrapped a fill in, it was me, him and Bora, who was an Islamic guy. You know, so we had middle east peace talks in our, in our dorm rooms. Well, we actually lived together in a

Sir Gene:

you're not racist cuz you had a black friend. I get it. Okay.

Sir Ben:

no I, but here's the difference there. I think there is a marked difference between the Torah and thet. There's a

Sir Gene:

There is they're they're two different things. Yes.

Sir Ben:

Well, they're a, a huge stretch between them. And I think a lot of people, you know, look I'm anyway. I think we're touching way too much of a third rail here, but

Sir Gene:

I I'm not touching anything. You're standing out. I'm just saying that, you know, it's, if you're gonna, if you're gonna provide definitions of words, at least let's be accurate.

Sir Ben:

Go to the Tal definition. That's the way I would go, but okay. The Talmudic definition is, look, it doesn't matter. It's it? This entire conversation, which is easily gonna be taken way outta context is about the othering. don't care what religion someone is. I don't care what race they are. I don't care anything. I care about the thoughts, the, their me methodology, their, their individual personality, the right, the right definition and the right way to look at someone is the individual.

Sir Gene:

That's exactly right.

Sir Ben:

That's a, there are lots of things written. There are lots of things done that don't take that level of analysis that I can be critical of.

Sir Gene:

But you have to admit generalization allows you to do

Sir Ben:

it's an outsourcing

Sir Gene:

without, without generalization.

Sir Ben:

Sure. And the right balance of that is important to.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And this is why I think that stereotypes are not, not only valid, but also important is because it's a shorthand for a perceived negative. Usually. I mean, most stereotypes are negative. Some are, I guess, are positives. Like you keep bringing up how smart Jews are. I guess it's a positive stereotype, but it, it's a, it's a way to communicate without having to go through a long list.

Sir Ben:

Okay. And then you end up in anothering scenario and when you end up

Sir Gene:

Which is natural and that's kind of what I

Sir Ben:

it is

Sir Gene:

point with.

Sir Ben:

It is natural, but it's also dangerous because of the proclivity that it leads to.

Sir Gene:

But I think it's part of the human condition. I know. And not even human. I think it's part of the mammal condition. Maybe not even mammal, maybe just animal world in general, that you, you cannot, you, you can't afford to not separate other animals that you meet from each other. You have to separate the predator from the prey. You have to separate the strong from the weak, the, the herd animals from the solitary animals, all these different categories allow you to then make decisions based on what category, a particular thing fits in as to what your next course of action is. If, if you have a deer that is walking towards you, your action should be different than if you have a bear walking towards you. Right.

Sir Ben:

I mean, I think I'm shooting either one, but go ahead.

Sir Gene:

okay. Well, in your case, I guess there's no difference. No. And in my case, I would wanna pet the bear and shoot a deer.

Sir Ben:

no, see I'm, I'm looking at food versus, you know,

Sir Gene:

Oh, I'm just looking at an animal. I really like, and bears are super cool.

Sir Ben:

You. Yeah,

Sir Gene:

deer are just, they're just big rats. They're stupid. Dumb, big rats.

Sir Ben:

man, I had a instance where I was at a, my dad's a contractor and he was working at this, on this house in

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Military contractor. Got

Sir Ben:

I showed up and had the dog with me and dog starts barking and has two bear Cubs tree. And we are between the mom and those Cubs, not a fun situation,

Sir Gene:

no, just should the

Sir Ben:

a good place to be.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, no, I don't. I I'm a big fan of bears. People probably already know this from my posts on no, on the social. I post a lot of videos that have bears doing cool stuff. Like, you know, once they figure out that you're gonna feed 'em, they, they get on the regular schedule they? They don't, they don't like to expend extra energy. So if they know they can get some free food somewhere, they're gonna show up every day.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. They're definitely the type of animal that is smart enough to be lazy.

Sir Gene:

Yes. That's a very astute observation. I cuz I do. People don't realize this, but you do need to be above average intelligence in order to have the ability to be lazy.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Yeah, that is

Sir Ben:

yeah. To be able to figure out how to avoid work. Yes. Well, and you know, what it comes down to is, and, and that's why. When you look at predictors of success intelligence is definitely the number one, but the number two is conscientiousness. So the reason why that's important is exactly what you just said, because you can be very smart, but very lazy, but when you're conscientious and doing what you said, you're gonna do and following through and working hard, if you have those two on your side, I mean, that's the best combination that's going

Sir Gene:

yeah. Well, laziness is a Dr. It's it's basically letting entropy drive things.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Things will just fall where they may you know where, whereas I'm trying to make a concerted effort to do things in spite of entropy tends to result in positive outcomes.

Sir Ben:

yeah, well, and much like the controlled demolition we are currently going through,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

know, did you did you see the stark market on Tuesday? Did

Sir Gene:

no, I didn't know. I was busy.

Sir Ben:

terrible. Anyone in tech heavy 401ks took a blood bath, but yeah.

Sir Gene:

I can't imagine anybody would have money in the market right now.

Sir Ben:

Well, I mean, I, I still have 401k money in there.

Sir Gene:

You move it out of stock market?

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

I would move it out of the stock market.

Sir Ben:

There's not much I can do on a couple of them. Unfortunately, but everything that I have direct control over that I can move to positions that I want to be in is, you know, I I've, I've sold off my entire money market accounts, moved over to other investments.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm yeah,

Sir Ben:

elitist of me saying that, but, you know, Hey,

Sir Gene:

it's money market's probably better, I would say, but I'm, I'm, I'm telling you that, like the story I heard over and over from people that were eight, nine figure you know, people that everyone's just looking at land right now.

Sir Ben:

well, and you know, here, here's the thing. If we have a crash, a lot of people lose their jobs. I am worried about a lot of people like me ending up in a very bad financial position. You know, if you take your average average, if you take the normal six figure income family, and you look at the amount of debt that they're normally in, you know, they've got all new cars, they've got monthly payments on that. They've got a big house, they've got a big monthly payment on that. They've got you. Tens of thousands of dollars, a credit card debt that they're paying on and everything else. And that's a, that person suddenly loses their job and they have literally no savings other than whatever 401k investments that they've made, that they haven't been monitoring or paying attention to. That's gonna be a really, really bad situation when you see a lot of pampered people homeless.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. That's true.

Sir Ben:

I

Sir Gene:

Um, and I, I think it is definitely coming not a, not a good thing, not something I'm looking forward to obviously, but I think a lot of people have gotten used to a level of comfort that requires a certain income and they don't have a year or more worth of savings in the.

Sir Ben:

a hundred percent and you know, I

Sir Gene:

that year is worth a year anymore. It's at best, it's worth about eight months now.

Sir Ben:

well, and you know, that that's the thing. And you know, I, I, quite frankly, I'm worried about myself. I look at what's going on and I'm trying to play on the best I can for my family. And know, that in, in and of itself will help me a lot, but, you know, I've. I'm not as prepared as I'd like to be,

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

to be honest with you, I'm just not,

Sir Gene:

Well, you gotta have a year's worth of water.

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

You, you gotta make sure you, you keep a year's worth of water to survive.

Sir Ben:

I do not have the, no one has the possibility of storing a year's worth of water. I do have several months worth of food and I consider that cheap insurance, you know, you know, and that's one of the things, why are we storing food? Well, you know, if I ever lose my job, at least we won't have to worry about a grocery bill. You know, that sort of thing. It it's just a dub robust sort of thing to me. And I know I'm gonna be better off than the average guy out there. But when I look at what's going with the stock market, when I look at what's going on in society, dude, maybe it goes the way of 2008. Maybe we screw over the rest of the world. We get rid of a sick sister and we continue on. But what if we don't.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, huh? There's a possibility, there's a possibility of many things and I, the bigger risk factor, in my opinion, isn't simply that we go into a very deep depression and I don't want to use the word recession cuz we're beyond that. But but what happens as a result of that is the real danger in my opinion, because what we could end up with is a people taking control politically as a result of disenfranchised, large swath of the population that ends up pushing things in a very different direction than this country has been going in.

Sir Ben:

Well, the, you know, the only reason why America didn't go the way of Germany is because of the treaty of Versaci. And we were able to push off as much as we did on Germany in the 1930s, Germany was in hyperinflation, the Imar Republic, everything else. Well, we had the great depression here and it is by the skin of our teeth and the rebuilding of Europe that we did not go the exact same way economically.

Sir Gene:

Oh world war II, I think did tremendous work in pulling the us out of the depression.

Sir Ben:

the, it is the only reason why we came out of the depression, but I am saying that pre-World war II, the only reason why V. The Weimar Republic in Germany saw hyperinflation and the us did not through the works programs and everything that was done was because of the amount of trade with Europe to rebuild Europe that stave that off. Right.

Sir Gene:

Yep. Well, and, and inflation is just around the corner because I mean, we already have inflation, but I mean, massive inflation because I, I heard somebody extremely intelligent just the other day. When we couldn't get into a, a, a nice restaurant that's adjacent to a winery because they were, they, they had a two hour wait for tables and the reason they had a two hour wage for tables was because they were short on staff. They had the space, they had empty tables. They had no staff to work those table. And this comment from this extremely smart dude was when are they gonna start realizing they need to start paying people more money so that they don't run out of staff and they have full use of the restaurant. And while it seems like, well, that will solve the immediate problem for this person of not having to wait two hours in line or two hours for getting a table at a nice restaurant. Other than the fact, the restaurant's ability to exist, it's profitability is built around certain wages. And if they have to pay $20 an hour for wait staff, that restaurant will have to fire everybody and go out of business because it's no longer gonna be profitable. But that aside even, okay, let's say they're able to do that. And they start paying everybody $20 an hour to work there. So they have to increase their prices, their prices go up but that money is put back into the economy, through the higher wages they're paying. If everybody did that, well, guess what? Your a hundred dollars meal would end up being $150 meal

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

and the people making $40 an hour, wouldn't be able to afford to live at those wages and they would need $60 an hour. Just to survive because everybody raised their prices across the board for everything, because that restaurant raise its prices.

Sir Ben:

so it's gonna be interesting. Well, it's gonna be interesting, cuz California is going to $22 an hour, minimum wage next year,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And I, but they also have exemptions for actual farm workers.

Sir Ben:

which is hilarious.

Sir Gene:

Uhhuh, Uhhuh.

Sir Ben:

So the people doing the actual manual labor?

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Oh fuck you. You can make a buck an hour, but everybody else, you know, that's working at the state jobs, government jobs, university jobs, fast food jobs, whatever. Yeah. They're, they're gonna be making a minimum wage of 44,000 a year.

Sir Ben:

I would not want to own a Starbucks or McDonald's franchise in California right now. I would be divesting myself with

Sir Gene:

I honestly don't understand why companies hell just shut down all their offices in California. Fuck California. Let it sink. I've been saying that for years and I think it's a beautiful place. I just defended it the other day, but I said, but you gotta get rid of the Californians

Sir Ben:

Yeah, we, we

Sir Gene:

not by making a move to Texas either.

Sir Ben:

we, we could have a big earthquake and, you know, redefine the coastline and be better off

Sir Gene:

I think the island of California ought to join the island of Taiwan and have a separate independent government still be technically one United States policy. But run things in their own socialist communist way that they

Sir Ben:

not take any tax

Sir Gene:

and, and the Chinese Navy can be guarding them from access by the United States and ensuring their sovereignty. Yeah. I'm all for that.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So we dodged a big bullet this week. I don't know if you saw this, but the railroad railroad union

Sir Gene:

Hmm. No what happened?

Sir Ben:

dude, the railroad workers almost striked.

Sir Gene:

We still have railroads. I forget about that.

Sir Ben:

The majority of goods shipped across the nation goes on rail.

Sir Gene:

I dunno, dude. I play truck simulator. I know exactly how much stuff goes on truck

Sir Ben:

You okay, trucks are, this is, this is an argument of transmission versus distribution. Sure. Trucks play a huge role in distribution.

Sir Gene:

me Amazon ships their products to me by railroad.

Sir Ben:

a hundred percent

Sir Gene:

I think you're full shit.

Sir Ben:

go look at

Sir Gene:

are no Amazon truck or cars. Train cars is what I meant to say.

Sir Ben:

absolutely. They come in from the port and they go to X, Y big city via rail. And then they're distributed via truck. 100%. The amount of goods that come in and are transported across this nation via rail still is a huge, huge percentage regardless.

Sir Gene:

just bought their first 250 containers for the railroad. And they started a pilot program on the west coast.

Sir Ben:

that they own, but I guarantee you they've been shipping things by rail for as long as they have existed. Anything coming in from China hits a rail car With very few

Sir Gene:

yeah, I I've not investigated this enough to argue against it intelligently, but my gut says that it's mostly trucks.

Sir Ben:

Okay. Well, regardless

Sir Gene:

think raw materials absolutely get transported by rail.

Sir Ben:

coal.

Sir Gene:

I've seen a lot of those cars going by

Sir Ben:

so there are power plants that live and die off of their rail

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Um, oil, I mean, lots of raw materials are transported. Finished goods are transported by rail. There are lots and lots of things that involves rail chemicals, chemicals, and chemical precursors between plants, all rail. You know, there there's some pipeline, but like when you're talking about

Sir Gene:

yeah, yeah,

Sir Ben:

specialty chemicals or products or plastics, you know, a lot of that is not stable enough to be. Ship through a pipeline that you cannot guarantee. What else it, what El, what other residue is in there?

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

I, I, anyway, the,

Sir Gene:

this reminded me of a couple of, a couple of new ideas that I heard about at this event thing.

Sir Ben:

well, let me finish this thought real quick.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, go ahead.

Sir Ben:

the avoidance of this this

Sir Gene:

about a strike.

Sir Ben:

strike is huge because had that happened,

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

We'd be in depression level settings right now. I mean,

Sir Gene:

mean no more toilet paper at the store?

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

No more toilet paper at the grocery store,

Sir Ben:

Well, there, I mean, we still have supply chain issues from the pandemic and everything else, but yeah. The rail strike had it gone on a week, would've had significant impact to the us

Sir Gene:

but why wouldn't they, why wouldn't the government do the same thing they did with the air traffic controllers and just call that industry. A yeah.

Sir Ben:

Probably frankly, I think that was the threat that got 'em to sign the deal. I think we got really close to nationalizing, which if you look at countries that go the route of socialism that go the route of communism, it starts that way. I think the start of this really was under Reagan with the nationalization of the air traffic controllers.

Sir Gene:

Well, I, I think that was the wrong move. I think they, they should have busted that union. I don't think people in professions, including cops where they're, they're serving a public good can also be part of a union. I think those two things are at odds because the union is focused on getting the best bang for the buck, the best deal for the employee. But that job requires a certain level of commitment to the outcome of society. It it'd be no different than politicians unionizing, regardless of party. And then saying, we demand better pay better, whatever. Oh, we demand that politicians have immunity from prison. If they unionize, they could say that, Hey, if you don't like it, we're all gonna go on strike and you'll be stuck with no politicians. Some people would say that'd be a good

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I mean, Jean, you're talking about utopia here.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, but I mean, yes, yes, sure. But imagine the chaos that would cause when all of a sudden there are no plot. Oh. How about the, the, how about judges? How about a judges' union? Oh yeah. We need to get paid more. We need better benefits or no more cases will be heard. This year. Law will be delayed because we're unionized. are certain professions. If you choose to enter that profession, which are not, they, they are, how do I phrase this? They should, by definition, exclude the ability to organize

Sir Ben:

Okay, so here, here's my thing. I am not a union guy. Never been a union guy.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

I think freedom of association is absolute

Sir Gene:

that's not what a union is. A union confers, special rights to an organized group of people that individuals within

Sir Ben:

union is a mob.

Sir Gene:

It is not, it is worse than the mob.

Sir Ben:

Well, yeah, you, you can force someone to pay your dues and everything else. Anyway, I, I don't like unions the way they are currently organized. I think freedom of association and ability to organize and submit a redress of grievances is a good thing. I

Sir Gene:

That's not what a union is. Yeah. Because a union, so this special entity that's been created of a union and.

Sir Ben:

touching the third rail.

Sir Gene:

That's that's every week and the way that it has rights, that the individuals that are part of the union do not like you cannot fire somebody for going on strike, but you can fire any individual if they're not part of a union and they stop working. What the fuck, man? What the

Sir Ben:

man. Hey, I'm I'm not a union fan. I, I, I don't know why anyone would wanna work in a union job. The, because here's the thing. When you work in a normal career, there's always flexibility. There's always room room for individuality. When, when you work a union job, you have to be a rule follower. You have to follow that book. Exactly. Or you're done

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm it's not a meritocracy. That's that's one of the other problems with the unions is that the you're just a

Sir Ben:

and service.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, it's a you're and in your're fully replaceable and identical and no, I get it. I get why there was a drive to unionize in places. You know, like, like the Ford factory, right? Which treated people like they were machines

Sir Ben:

Well, I mean, we gotta go back and understand why modern education exists, why every, why we're here. And that goes back to

Sir Gene:

serve our betters. Come on. Everybody knows that.

Sir Ben:

It goes back to the Robert Barrons and the idea of creating a better factory worker and the company store, you know, Tennessee Ford had, but I owe my soul to the company store.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

there's a reason why those lyrics exist, you know? And that's what unions were meant

Sir Gene:

Amazon is these days.

Sir Ben:

Oh, Jesus Christ. No shit

Sir Gene:

Yep. You get your, well, you remember that song in fact, south park literally did that song parody version for Amazon. Do you remember that

Sir Ben:

I haven't seen that one. No,

Sir Gene:

Oh, dude, look it up. So if you have, yeah, and I think you can get every single episode through HBO you know, online or whatever the hell they are.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, yeah

Sir Gene:

cuz they keep moving and I hate that about south park. Cause they kept changing what network they're on. It's like freaking annoying, just, you know, pick one.

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

So, but yeah, they, they did that whole like, you know, driving into Amazon and on a Amazon driverless car and then working at the Amazon shipping thing to basically pick up boxes and hand them to a robot as the job of the humans is to give things to robot.

Sir Ben:

Well,

Sir Gene:

and then they kept accelerating everything in the factory cuz op they're all about optimization. And so if you can run something with less than 0.5% defect and error rate, that means you're not running it fast enough. So you gotta be able to accelerate that time.

Sir Ben:

Well, and you know, what people don't remember and recognize is that people were paid in company money,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm yeah,

Sir Ben:

it, it, you didn't get us dollars as wages

Sir Gene:

You get Amazon credits,

Sir Ben:

Exactly. And

Sir Gene:

which you can spend at the Amazon store

Sir Ben:

so we came out of CDO and we had

Sir Gene:

still are.

Sir Ben:

well, we had this period where, you know, we've enjoyed

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

a lot more freedom than we otherwise would've had, I think in the 19, from about 1900 to about 19, we'll say 25, there was a push to return to that surf film. I think the company store and the union busting that happened was a push towards

Sir Gene:

Disney's fucking had their own courts.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, exactly. Yeah. Disney's a whole nother story.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

And I think now a hundred years later, we're getting another push towards pushing us back to really true CDO. I agree with you that, you know, taxation, everything else that's going on. We are surfs still in many ways, but I, I think there's a marked difference between actual SEF and where we're at today.

Sir Gene:

I don't know, man. I mean, sure, sure. Do. You can point to specifics, however, in the general sense, there's not a whole lot of difference. You still don't own your own life. The government owns your life.

Sir Ben:

but you do have the ability to own land still

Sir Gene:

You have the ability to borrow land from the government because you pay taxes on that land every year to the government, regardless of what you do with that land,

Sir Ben:

true.

Sir Gene:

could buy a house and not live in it and still you have to pay taxes on it. Why you're not getting any benefits from that house that you own, that isn't occupied. Why, why do you have to pay to the government and not a small amount of money, especially in Texas.

Sir Ben:

well, you know, we, we don't have an income tax, so there's that?

Sir Gene:

Thank you, Mr. Excuse, man. It's a lot of money. I don't care what we don't have. The the fact that you have to pay in perpetuity to a government for the use of quote unquote, your land

Sir Ben:

I agree. I mean, it's equivalent to share cropping in many ways. I

Sir Gene:

is, and it served them. that's what, that's the difference between slaves and surfs slaves lived on property that was wholly owned by their masters. Surfs lived on property that they had to pay to the LA to the Lord order to live on that. But they could have their own little garden. They could, they could keep, you know, a certain portion of things for themselves. If they had, you know, milk cows or whatever, they would have to provide milk to the, to the Lord. But then they could keep a little bit from themselves. And that's where we are. This is what most people, well, let's put this way. This is what everybody that lives on the salary is your surf. If you're not at a point of being independently wealthy to where your money is being generated through investments, then you are a surf.

Sir Ben:

Have you ever read Hayak

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

you ever read the road to surf them?

Sir Gene:

I, I can't remember anything out of it, but it sounds familiar.

Sir Ben:

Anyone who's interested in this topic should read that book.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm book of the week.

Sir Ben:

Well, and Nigel Farage did a pretty interesting take on the new road to surf them

Sir Gene:

Really? Then I have not heard. I like Nigel fries. He's been is an interesting character.

Sir Ben:

he's a fire brand,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm Yeah, he's definitely provided a lot of entertainment

Sir Ben:

little on the Liber teen side for me, but you know,

Sir Gene:

Uhhuh. Yeah, it

Sir Ben:

as you are, but that's okay.

Sir Gene:

just as I am, I'm a long way from being a teenager. My friend,

Sir Ben:

Liber, teen does not

Sir Gene:

I know I'm just having fun with you. Alright. So, what else is going on be you, so you wanted to finish your story about the strike before we moved on

Sir Ben:

I'm good. I, I just think that we dodged an economic bullet there that would've really been bad.

Sir Gene:

would've been a very, see, this is a problem, right? So the, the, the workers could have been threatened. The union, I should say, could have been threatened with nationalization, but just as easily Biden administration is threatened with a strike like that, right before the elections, which absolutely would move more people to vote against the administration. Not for necessarily any Republicans, but against administration.

Sir Ben:

Well, and I think that's what we saw in the election of Biden was not votes for Biden, but against Trump

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Cuz that's what people call us around is the things they dislike. Those are the things they have in common. So the two things that I wanted to mention, and I I'm curious genuinely because to hear your opinion of both of 'em. I've not done a deep dive in either ones. But it seems a little suspicious to me, but again, these are seven and eight figure wealth folks talking.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Uh, so one of them was the, the great news that we'd now apparently came up with a method to extract lithium from the oceans.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

Now that's about as much as I know about it, I haven't done any research. My initial gut feel for anything like this is okay. And then what will become an imbalance as a result of that? Because extracting anything from the ocean is a lot more risky than extracting something from rock.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, I mean, it's like California's water issues, right? Desalinization. Well, then you end up with Brian, what do you do with the salt?

Sir Gene:

Well, you dump it all and you sell it, put it in the ground.

Sir Ben:

And, yeah, there are methods to extract lithium from seawater, but

Sir Gene:

I didn't even know there was lithium and sea water. This is how dumb down I am.

Sir Ben:

I mean, there's lots of things in seawater, but I mean, it's a salt,

Sir Gene:

the, the brain eating ABAs. I.

Sir Ben:

but, but the problem is it's such a low percentage. And what do you do with the rest of the water? You know, it just, the, I would have questions and I would think that there's some potential environmental issues there

Sir Gene:

Yeah. So maybe this

Sir Ben:

neither are one of us are environmentalists by any stretch, but at the same time, we're also not destructive individuals.

Sir Gene:

Oh yeah. And, and not idiots. And, and to me, anytime you come up with a way to extract something, you have to look at a analysis of the impact. I mean, I, God damn, I can't believe I'm using the word impact study, but but yes, you have to do an impact study. You have to figure out what will this do, because this is how you end up getting in trouble as you decide, oh, there's free lithium in the, in the water. And in fact, we can even power the whole thing by solar power. So it's it's net neutral and we're gonna get free lithium for our electric batteries by using sunlight. Okay. And, and then we end up having no fish to eat because all the fish died.

Sir Ben:

and, and, you know, this is like the nuclear it waste issue. If anything, we ought to be mandating the use of breeder reactors as an

Sir Gene:

Oh yeah. Yeah,

Sir Ben:

destructive method, because, you know, if you think of a light water reactor and the fuel rod as a battery light water reactor only uses about down to 70% of the potential energy in that. Rod before it's no longer feasible. Whereas if you take that same quote, unquote expended fuel rod and without re refining it or anything else, and you take that and you put it in a, you know, breeder, reactor I E RRB one, which was the first nuclear power plant in the world.

Sir Gene:

even the first nuclear power plant too.

Sir Ben:

anyway, you, you take that and you can take that energy down to about 5%. So now, instead of tens of thousands of years of half life, you have under a thousand years of half life, and that's something that we can take companies and say, Hey, you're gonna put enough money in a trust to take care of that. And that's a reasonable expectation, but you know, what, what the government's tried to do with the storage, you know, is just

Sir Gene:

and you can still generate power from that even at 5%. Just not like a lot of power.

Sir Ben:

It's not enough actually at that point, it's not enough refined material to sustain a reaction.

Sir Gene:

No, no, no, but not as nuclear reaction, simply as heat.

Sir Ben:

Sure, sure. Yeah. It, there, there is still going to be a thermal decay.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, exactly. That's all. I was getting. Ugh. Sorry. I had to stretch. We're recording this super early in the morning. Ben,

Sir Ben:

not because I slept

Sir Gene:

woke. Yeah. You slept in

Sir Ben:

one time in my life.

Sir Gene:

Uhhuh. Well, that's good. You deserve a little sleep in time.

Sir Ben:

dude, I, like I said, I've got a little bit of a raspy voice this morning, not feeling

Sir Gene:

makes you, makes you sound more professional. I think

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

raspy is good on the radio.

Sir Ben:

it, what ended up happening was I didn't set an alarm because usually I'm woken up regardless at kids and everything else. And for some reason I was left alone this morning.

Sir Gene:

Hmm.

Sir Ben:

so that's what

Sir Gene:

out outlived your usefulness. Apparently

Sir Ben:

That happened a long time ago.

Sir Gene:

nothing worse for a guy than to experience that. Well, I mean, it feels like it's a good thing at first, but then you realize, oh wait, people don't really need me. Huh. And you end up just kind of like degrading back to your teenage self and just playing video games all day. Huh?

Sir Ben:

I'm I'm not quite

Sir Gene:

Okay. So let me bring up the second thing that was mentioned, the long similar lines seems like a brilliant idea. If you don't consider the consequences

Sir Ben:

okay.

Sir Gene:

and that is a new process that or a new system device, whatever for for. Creating hydrogen out of thin air in the, and, and putting, putting these sites, even in locations like the Sahara desert and the way that this operates also based off solar power is by sucking the moisture out of already relatively dry air. And then splitting the the water molecule into hydrogen oxygen, which to me again, is sort of, again, not, you know, not an environmentalist, but hold up here, there are plenty of things that live in deserts that are super economical with water, but there's nothing that I'm aware of that is alive at all on the planet that doesn't require some water.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So the, again, cracking cracking H two O is an expensive proposition.

Sir Gene:

Their idea is it's all solar who gives a shit,

Sir Ben:

okay. It's still bound. I mean, cracking those bonds is not trivial.

Sir Gene:

Done it. Everybody's done it. If you've been in a science class, you've done it.

Sir Ben:

Oh, absolutely. You know, I mean, if you build a efficient gas fire, you're essentially cracking water at that point. You know, and you're producing oxygen and hydrogen as a fuel to burn, you know? And so if you look at a gas fire, what it breaks down to is you have oxygen, hydrogen and co, which are all extremely combustible especially together. Yeah, I, I, I agree with you that looking at pulling moisture at that point, instead of cracking hydrogen, why not crack CO2

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

you, if CO2 is such a problem and you want to reduce CO2 levels in the atmosphere?

Sir Gene:

they, they, the same people that think this is great. Don't want to use anything that will generate energy as a result of combining carbon in oxygen. No burning of fuels. Even if they're manmade,

Sir Ben:

Well, but you could totally be net neutral by saying, okay, we're going to have a plant.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I mean it's

Sir Ben:

CO2 outta the atmosphere and create co

Sir Gene:

of a brain to think that way. It it's it's it's essentially just utilizing as part of a chemical chain.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Well, and you know, the, the hard part, so CO2 to co is pretty easy, but it's when you get into those bigger hydrocarbon chains, that gets a lot nastier. But yeah.

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

Anyway, no, I think pulling moisture out of the air to mine, hydrogen is not a

Sir Gene:

Yeah, because they're all about sustainable fuels and, and that, and being clean and carbon neutral

Sir Ben:

well, and here, here, here's the thing you're going to, by doing that, let's say we go to a hydrogen economy. All you're doing is you wanna talk about climate change. You wanna talk about fucking with the environment. You're literally moving moisture from wherever you're taking it from

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

to the cities. So, you know, you think of, you think of Houston in the traffic and 59 and 2, 2 90 or 59, 6, 10, rather one of the busiest intersections in the world and all those cars putting

Sir Gene:

dumping water

Sir Ben:

water, water vapor.

Sir Gene:

Yep. That's gonna be interesting. It'll be, oh, well maybe this is why blade runner got it. Right. Is it just gonna be permanently rainy and foggy?

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

That's that's the future that it holds and then

Sir Ben:

Around the cities,

Sir Gene:

the only sunny parts are all just filled with solar stations

Sir Ben:

well blade runner

Sir Gene:

from everything else.

Sir Ben:

slash judge dread, you know, the mega cities and the outside is desert nothing.

Sir Gene:

The thing is, this is how people that live in those cities. Think of us already. They're in the city. We're in the wasteland

Sir Ben:

To a large extent. Yeah. Fly over country. That, that entire thought

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm yep. There's nothing there. There's just some farms.

Sir Ben:

So I put the to switch to, to the gun topic of the day. I put the optic on the pistol.

Sir Gene:

Oh, nice. Okay. Good.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Took it to the range. And man, you know, I caught myself closing one eye.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

It it's, it's gonna be a little bit of a difference. I'm actually less accurate with the optic right now, but it, I, I think that's

Sir Gene:

you know, technically you don't have to close your eye. Even when you shoot with normal sites, you just have to get used to it.

Sir Ben:

is. Okay. Well,

Sir Gene:

your dominant eye and use your dominant

Sir Ben:

I have grown up doing it and it's, it

Sir Gene:

What is your dominant eye by the way?

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

Are you right? Dominant?

Sir Ben:

Yes.

Sir Gene:

Okay. Well that makes it easier.

Sir Ben:

I'm pretty typical. As far as that goes I'm right-handed and right. Eye

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm yeah. My dad was left eye dominant and right handed, which was annoying for him.

Sir Ben:

Absolutely

Sir Gene:

And even for like old school photo cameras where you had to look through a, you

Sir Ben:

view finder.

Sir Gene:

cuz he'd always want to use his, his other eye and then your nose goes against and smudges, you know, buttons and things.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So you you, you called me up and then was asking me a question about a cartridge

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. So I, I kind of went down a rabbit hole and I do this occasionally people that know me know this as sometimes I start watching YouTube videos night, wake up 30 hours later, still watching YouTube videos. I mean, not say I was asleep, I was awake that whole time, but it, I was unconscious of the rest of the world. And the, the per the specific topic I was watching was different cartridges because I, to be honest, I kind of stopped caring about any new cartridges, probably in the late nineties. And I knew there were some new ones that were coming out, you know, but whatever, what, what do they call 'em wild

Sir Ben:

Wildcat.

Sir Gene:

Wildcats. Right. I was happy with my 2 23 and my 3 0 8. I didn't need I didn't really see a purpose to mortgages. I, I was never shooting in Montana, so I didn't need to use a Winchester 300 wind mag or anything. So, you know, as far as I was concerned, those were the two main characteristics. I'd mostly settled on 40 caliber as the best alternative on the handguns. I started off with nine moved to 45, which was much better than nine, and then realized that I can't carry as much ammo that way. And that the cost of the 40 fives was always more than nine or 40. So 40 was a good compromise. So that it's, it kind of stuck with that for 20 years. Right. And then lately kind of getting back into guns a little more and, and looking at alternatives. I see all these names I don't know anything about. So I started doing some more research and my research, I mean, watching YouTube videos and what a,

Sir Ben:

Which is the best education system in the

Sir Gene:

I mean, honestly, you can say a lot of bad things about Google and about YouTube and their censorship, but when it comes to just non-controversial topics.

Sir Ben:

and a ability to go down a rabbit hole. Absolutely. And rumble and everywhere else does not have the same.

Sir Gene:

it. They don't have the depth.

Sir Ben:

Now here's the thing. Pre 2016, before Google really started censoring

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

YouTube was absolutely excellent.

Sir Gene:

oh yeah. FPSs, Russia, biggest YouTube channel for years.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

What was it about a guy shooting cool guns. That was literally the biggest channel on YouTube for several years. And even now guys like demolition ranch are like 20 million subscribers, a channel where a goofy dude out here in Texas shoots really cool guns at crazy shit. Anyway, so, so deep dive in that. And what I, the realization I kind of came to is that the 2 23 cartridge this point has become quite archaic and much better alternatives exist. And the one that seems to be the best of the alternatives that I found was the six, five Grundle.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So Jean welcome to the two thousands. First of all you know, we,

Sir Gene:

a while for me to get here.

Sir Ben:

here's the thing nine mill 2 23, they serve their purpose. They're cheap, they're whatever. But I think the way I would call them, and I think you're of the same mindset is they're pussy cartridges, right? The, they are, and the FBI is a perfect example. The FBI tried to go to 40 Cal. Well, they've tried to go to 10 millimeter and they ended up with 40 Cal and what it, their scores went to the bottom. And here's the thing. If you can't handle Ray coil, you don't need to look at any of these cartridges, but if you're a decent shot and you know how to keep a gun on target

Sir Gene:

Well, certainly if you shot 3 0 8 and you're okay with that, any of these carts are gonna be

Sir Ben:

Oh, yeah. Yeah. So you you're looking at Grandle, which I think is the current modern choice when I was building a couple AR back in the day I went with six, eight SPC because Grinold, wasn't invented yet. And gr and six, eight SPC are pretty similar in lots of ways. Ballistically. Another reason why I went with it is cuz six, eight is the same as same sizes, the two 70. So bullet choices were a big thing for me, cuz I'm doing a lot of my own loading, but the, the problem I have is the FBI statistic. And what ends up happening is a lot of these cartridges exist. They're out there. They're great. They're fantastic. They are better than 5 56, but the idiots out there are not gonna want the recoil. They're gonna see the ammo prices that you and I don't necessarily care as much about. And I think 5 56 and nine mil are still the most popular choices for a reason. That's it. the us government really does go with the six, eight fury, the 2, 2, 2 27 fury round moves away from 5 0 6. I still think you have a decade or more of surplus AMO, that's gonna be out there. That's gonna keep it really popular. But yeah, there there's room for a new cartridge in the AR RS platforms.

Sir Gene:

think so because you combine what you just said, which is the adoption by the us military of the new SI ground

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

and the banning of the importation of Russian 7 62 ammo.

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

And those are like the, the two cheapest Sams is the old 2 23 or 5 56 ammo from the AR and the 7 62 by 39 ammo from the AKs, everything else, literally everything else is more expensive. And so there, there is now I think an opportunity for as those, both of those start drying up and like you said, it may a decade, but they, they definitely are both drying up for a new adoption of a cartridge for mass market by people saying, well, shit, if I can't get either one of these cheap and I have to pay more for something, what is the best cartridge that, that something is given the guns that I own?

Sir Ben:

well, and you know what, what comes down to me and the reason why I'm not a fan of 5 0 6 is to me, it's a environment round, you know, I'd rather have a seven I'd rather honestly have a 17 HMR than a 2 23 in lots of situations. And I know that's a Nama, a lot of people, but.

Sir Gene:

my well, and I, and I, I would agree with you. I mean, I kind of grew up with two to three being a gopher round.

Sir Ben:

Exactly

Sir Gene:

That's mostly what you use it for, but my understanding, and again, I didn't, I, I, I may be wrong on this. I didn't do deep dive at all, but my understanding was that the reason for the adoption of that size round by the us military was a result of changes that they wanted to make, starting with world war II or post world war II, I should say. And the two benefits of that cartridge were one, a greater capacity for a a soldier to carry the number of rounds. So you have to resupply them less frequently. And the second part was that the statistics clearly demonstrated that having a non fatal hit was better than the fatal hit in combat because a non-fatal hit takes out several. Yeah. It takes more resources, otherwise defined as it preoccupies more people. If, if you have 10 people in an enemy outpost position and you, you shoot three of them, That will take two or three others to care, to stabilize the three that have been hit, but not killed. If you kill somebody there's nothing left to do, they don't have to take any time or effort away from shooting back at you. If, if people are wounded,

Sir Ben:

that it really works though.

Sir Gene:

I don't know that it works either. Like I, I, and I, I don't even know if this was a, truly was a consideration, but that's what, what I've heard. That's my understanding of why such a small cartridge was adopted is because we were trying to go for wounding hits and not kill shots in order to minimize the amount of, or I guess maximize the amount of resources. Like you said, that that entails

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Sure. You know, the, in the

Sir Gene:

because before that.

Sir Ben:

cartridge and all sorts of

Sir Gene:

Yeah. But, but we in world war II is we were using what 30, 30 rounds or 30 out six.

Sir Ben:

odd six,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And that'll kill

Sir Ben:

was a 30 out six, which is, you know, up there with like the 300, whether it be the 300 wind mag and

Sir Gene:

it it'll kill any animal bigger than the human as well.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Literally anything in north America. Sure. Yeah. Africa, you might need a little bit bigger gun

Sir Gene:

would they, would they, if you could kill a Buffalo with one of those, probably

Sir Ben:

a hundred percent.

Sir Gene:

30 at. I mean, it's still it's but it's a lower pressure cartridge than

Sir Ben:

It, it is. It's not as fast, but I mean, it's still just a tremendous round. 30

Sir Gene:

What, what's the,

Sir Ben:

a relevant

Sir Gene:

the normal weight on the 38. Six

Sir Ben:

Hundred and 60, 180 grain,

Sir Gene:

okay. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

I mean, but you can go up over two 20 easily, you know, same thing with the 300, all the 300 platforms which I've got a 300. And

Sir Gene:

oh, that's that's crazy. Me or crazy, man. Talk about the, the amount of recoil. Jesus.

Sir Ben:

I, that, yeah. So,

Sir Gene:

the most recoil cartridge of that size.

Sir Ben:

yeah, the 3 38 lap is

Sir Gene:

That's bigger though. But the rum is smaller.

Sir Ben:

smaller diameter. Yes.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. But with the same recoil

Sir Ben:

well, and you know, I mean, my target round for my just, you know, wanting to hit paper at a thousand yards out of that gun is 150 grain bullet. That's this is a load. I,

Sir Gene:

feet per second.

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So, and the recoil on that, man,

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

you're slinging

Sir Gene:

I have never shot one of those guns, but I've certainly had plenty of friends that had one for a while and then they got rid.

Sir Ben:

eh, this is why I like heavy guns

Sir Gene:

Okay, well for that, I would want the have again as well for two to three, I want the lightest fricking carbon fiber

Sir Ben:

yeah, sure. Yeah. Yeah. Wow. But

Sir Gene:

two to three. Doesn't have fucking recall it literally. Is it? It is a 22 with a little more powder

Sir Ben:

Yep. You know, here, here's the thing like my 300, I love it. It's it is a, it's what I call a meat gun. So, you know, I I've taken down deer at 700 yards with that rifle down a pipeline. You know, it, it, it, any, any time I'm hunting and I pull the trigger on that gun, I've got an animal and I, I, I love that

Sir Gene:

I think my longest animal hit was at about 110.

Sir Ben:

really.

Sir Gene:

not very far. I've really cuz it, you know, Minnesota, you got woods everywhere. So you you're basically, you can confined to the farm fields. And then on that border, there's always some trees and the deer like to be near the trees.

Sir Ben:

So in east Texas, the, my, my longest animal hit was right at 700 yard mark. And I've got this pipeline that runs across some property I have in east Texas, and it's about 850 yards. And then it takes a jog to the right. And I put a stand every year, usually I didn't last year and probably won't this year because of everything else, but used to put a stand at one end of the pipeline and some do walked out, you know, a hundred or so yard. South of the, the jog and took the shot and got one. So yeah. Worked

Sir Gene:

so that's a good question. So do you, do you shoot the dose too? Not just the the, what do you call the mail? Deers bucks. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Well, I'll tell you this I have killed way more dough than I've ever killed a buck. I'm not a trophy hunter. You know, it is just not a thing. I'm if I'm hunting it's for food and I, yes, I eat it. You

Sir Gene:

And I I'm right there with you. I've never been like, I'm not going, I don't have any, and I can't imagine having any antlers in the house. I get it. I, and I've stayed in a number of places that were lodges that were decorated with stuff like that. And that's cool. I've just have zero interest personally. So to me, it's, it's about the meat. It's it's not about the freaking antlers.

Sir Ben:

yeah. I mean, I, I will say this I was bow hunting on some company property at one point in time because they required me to use a bow, not a rifle, which is unfortunate because bow hunters lose way more animals than rifle. But anyway

Sir Gene:

get better errors.

Sir Ben:

well I was using a RBO and.

Sir Gene:

bow hunting. Come on.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, I was using a well exactly. I mean, I wanted to maximize my opportunities. Good Broadhead, everything else. And this atypical walked out. Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful buck. And I nailed him and he flopped

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

barely got up. Flopped, barely got up. Flopped ended up staggering off and I'm like, all right, good, good hit.

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

So I had another stand set up in a different area. I waited probably 20 minutes when he walked off, then I went and broke down my other stand, loaded, everything up before I even started tracking the animal. So this is a good 45 minutes before I start tracking the

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Well, I get about a hundred yards into the Bush and I look up and he's standing there with the arrow. Good broadside hit.

Sir Gene:

also there didn't go all the way through.

Sir Ben:

No, it did not. It hit something.

Sir Gene:

that's not bad. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So he's standing there and where I hit him, you know, should have just

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

lunged him and had

Sir Gene:

So you hit a rib is very what you're.

Sir Ben:

Yes. And he's standing there with the broad side in, in him and trots off I go.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, Jesus.

Sir Ben:

So I backed out again. Go sit. Wait anyway. I've got the, I still have the Google map records. Huh?

Sir Gene:

Did you not wanna shoot him a second time?

Sir Ben:

I didn't have the crossbo with me. I'd put it up. I thought this was

Sir Gene:

crossbo away. Okay. Right,

Sir Ben:

I tracked this sob for four and a half miles.

Sir Gene:

my God. With the arrow sticking out of him.

Sir Ben:

Well, I found the arrow. It eventually fell out.

Sir Gene:

he did. Okay. Well he probably that would've accelerated his bleed out

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well the last little bit I found was about a nickel size blood droplet

Sir Gene:

it? Jesus.

Sir Ben:

and it was in a pine Grove where all the pine needles, you know, around me in the fall and everything else. So everything's brown. I guarantee you, I was within 25 yards of him and never found founding.

Sir Gene:

Oh, you never found them. Oh my God.

Sir Ben:

And that just that I, I, I haven't bow hunted since I won't do it. I don't like losing

Sir Gene:

I, I really want to go bowl hunting. I've I've got a bow I've shot. Plenty of targets with it. I've never gone deer hunting with it.

Sir Ben:

I mean, I did in intercollegiate archery in college, you know, I, I I've, I've shot a bow. I'm decent with a bow. I, I just don't like losing animals and I've lost deer with a rifle too,

Sir Gene:

I have as well and that's not fun.

Sir Ben:

no

Sir Gene:

but it's I mean the, the big difference is just the range that you have to be at is much smaller with the bow.

Sir Ben:

well, in the womb channels you can produce with a bow are

Sir Gene:

oh, huge.

Sir Ben:

eat huge. Yeah,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I mean, I've seen what do you call 'em? Goddamn, I'm blanking out the name of this career. Like a big deer elk. I've seen elk go down in under a minute.

Sir Ben:

yeah,

Sir Gene:

Just bleed out just from a huge wound channel.

Sir Ben:

Well, you know, with a rifle my dad's philosophy what I, what I was raised with was, you know, taking head and neck shots and his philosophy, and the reason why I've kind of adopted it is you with a, with a rifle, especially you don't wo animals, you don't lose animals. You either miss 'em or you got 'em,

Sir Gene:

Yeah,

Sir Ben:

you know, none of this heart lung stuff where you gotta rely on either hitting the heart and ending it or bleed out, you know, either you either miss 'em or they're done.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

So

Sir Gene:

yeah, I there's something to be said for that, but again, I think most people are trophy hunting things, so they. Or at least combining trophy and food. So they don't want to damage the, the head,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Wow. I, you know, if, if I were to have any antlers in the house, which I don't currently, I would definitely go with a more European Mount where it's just the, you know,

Sir Gene:

just the LER without the head. Yeah. The heads are creepy. I have to say

Sir Ben:

You know, I, I, I, I don't mind tax Jeremy.

Sir Gene:

Yeah,

Sir Ben:

my dad had a oh shit. What's the type of duck. Oh,

Sir Gene:

I know a duck, whatever.

Sir Ben:

I forget what type of duck this was, but a hooded Ganser. There we go. Hooded Ganser he got a hooded Ganser and I had it mounted for him and it's a beautiful bird and that whole body bird mouth looks to me. Neat, but just a deer head coming outta the wall. Eh, not my

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm I, yeah, I like the full body ones that they used to. I don't know if they still do, but they used to have 'em in Cabellas and other

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

where you could literally just walk around a bunch of dead animals. They're cool. But I agree with you. I just, I, there there's nothing at all, appealing to me in, in having any animals that I've killed, have any parts of them. Hanging on my wall. I don't care if it's big fish you know, ocean fishing. I don't care if it's deer. I don't care what it is. It's just not interesting.

Sir Ben:

I mean a again like that hood of Ganser and everything else. There's some taxidermy that I think looks neat. But it's not something I typically decorate with, you know, like, and, and you might wanna cover your snakes ears, but like, you know, snake skin or something

Sir Gene:

known to have ears.

Sir Ben:

That was the joke

Sir Gene:

Okay, good. I'm glad you, you, you know, this little known fact.

Sir Ben:

anyway, you know, the there, you know, I don't know, there there's a place

Sir Gene:

Oh yeah. My, my ex-wife always used to say that this was the ultimate purpose for these critters. The pets is making boots. Yep. Mm-hmm yep.

Sir Ben:

well, not to admit to any crime, but yeah, there's some timber, timber Rattlers that are no more that that may or may not be in possession of

Sir Gene:

in possession of

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

dude, the legalities game wardens, and the way they can screw you is insane.

Sir Gene:

well. I thought anybody can kill the rattlesnakes cuz they're a nuisance.

Sir Ben:

No new, new,

Sir Gene:

kidding.

Sir Ben:

depending on the species of rattler timber, Rattlers, especially are protected species.

Sir Gene:

Oh, you can. I did not know that at all. I, about rattlesnakes. Is there some city that has a rattle snake festival every year here?

Sir Ben:

Yeah. There's also Prairie Prairie, dog hunts, all sort of

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

But anyway you know, when you get a six and a half foot timber, Atler, that's a, that's a pretty big snake for that species gene. That's a big snake.

Sir Gene:

Yes. My small snake is six and a half feet right now.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

The big one's three times longer.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Did you see the crocodile?

Sir Gene:

Which crocodile?

Sir Ben:

Oh, there's a guy this last week that killed like an 18 foot.

Sir Gene:

I did not see that now. Was it on the golf course or

Sir Ben:

no, no, no crocodile, not alligator.

Sir Gene:

Oh, oh,

Sir Ben:

in Africa,

Sir Gene:

in Africa. In the Nile.

Sir Ben:

man dinosaur.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Well they're technically not dinosaurs, but I get your point.

Sir Ben:

Well, this one might have been an old enough to be, I mean, to grow to 18 foot. Jesus,

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

I mean your normal Nile crock is under six foot.

Sir Gene:

No, I've seen it much longer than that.

Sir Ben:

very rarely that, okay.

Sir Gene:

They don't stop growing, you know?

Sir Ben:

That's my point.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. They're just like trees. They just add more rings. That's a joke.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Uh, I have pet a few alligators, never crocodiles. And they, they're probably the most primitive of any kind of reptiles

Sir Ben:

Oh, absolutely. The, they, they are consumers.

Sir Gene:

yeah. Yeah. They really, I mean, they think could be like six inches long and its whole goal is to bite your finger.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

It's not gonna be trying to run away. Like most animals would at that size. It's it's like, oh, Hey, you're moving. Therefore you're food

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

but that's why most of 'em get eaten when they're babies. Cause they have no sense of self-preservation

Sir Ben:

Well, and it it's that type of reptil. So for instance in Texas, we have, you know, geckos all over the place and,

Sir Gene:

In my garage.

Sir Ben:

yeah, I, I grabbed one the other day and was showing it to my son, which, you know, he was like, what the hell is this? But you know, this thing's two and a

Sir Gene:

didn't know what a Geto is.

Sir Ben:

Huh?

Sir Gene:

Which, which kid is this? He didn't know what a Geto is.

Sir Ben:

I mean, he hasn't really seen him until really this year, but anyway you know, this thing's two and a half inches long counting the tail, you know, it's, it's teeny and biking the shit out of me. as

Sir Gene:

there really?

Sir Ben:

can. Yeah, absolutely. You know, we, when I was a kid, we used to hang 'em off our ears as earrings and stuff like.

Sir Gene:

Oh my God.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

I've never been bit by a get go. I, when I've

Sir Ben:

Oh, they, they don't have jaw pressure to do anything

Sir Gene:

No, no, no. I know, but I mean, I've never, it's never attempted to bite me.

Sir Ben:

by the way, the average length of a Nile crocodile average adult length is 12 feet.

Sir Gene:

That there you go. That's more believable. Six feet is kind of short.

Sir Ben:

So the that's the average adult length, but you know, various widely, the largest ever recorded was 21 foot.

Sir Gene:

So is this guy hunting for it or was this just he killed it cuz it was somewhere. It shouldn't have been.

Sir Ben:

No, he was hunting for it. And it's a Mon I mean, it, it, it was over 1200 and it was 12, almost 1300 pounds.

Sir Gene:

There's a, a YouTube channel.

Sir Ben:

think of a lizard? That's 1300 pounds. The just insanity.

Sir Gene:

That's pretty good size. Yeah. Yeah, it's good. 1300 pounds. Yeah. I'm sure that's probably the biggest lizard out there.

Sir Ben:

One of them

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I, I can't think of any other species that get up to that size. Cause like the komodos are about 300 pounds. You know, the, the, the salt water cracks certainly get to a good size, but but yeah, they predate they predate dinosaurs much like sharks. They were around when the dinosaurs started getting bigger. Although they were also large crocodiles in the day as well.

Sir Ben:

Well, what was the, you know, like Megalodon is to dinosaur

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

charge, there was a, a crocodile equivalent

Sir Gene:

yeah, yeah. It was a something sous

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm and by the way, this is what happens when CO2 levels drop and oxygen levels drop get smaller.

Sir Gene:

yeah, exactly. I was gonna say you're backwards and that, but no, you're, you're exactly right. When things get, when those levels drop things get smaller. And that's why I've been a big advocate of increasing both oxygen and CO2 levels, because I want those big reptiles to come back.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

I'm a fan. I, I always enjoyed dinosaurs. I always thought that the, how cool would it be to be around Jurassic park? Like, to me, that would be one of, one of my life goals fulfilled.

Sir Ben:

So gene you'd like my son, cuz you know, he he's into nothing but guns and dinosaur.

Sir Gene:

That's a smart kid, right?

Sir Ben:

Well, it's funny, man. Like I ended up, so I have a gun safe and everything else, and I ended up getting a pistol safe because I've been keeping things in drawers and all that, but it's gotten to the point where his obsession with guns is. Okay. I've I, I, I, I'm not gonna rely on this being in a drawer that he doesn't know about because he just really is into him. So I got him some army men and in the army men that has these little miniature, you know, guns for them to hold and everything else. And he runs around with those going, you know, and just he's obsessed, but yeah. Dinosaurs and guns, man. That's his interest.

Sir Gene:

yeah, no, it's a good, healthy male interest. I think. I mean, di dinosaurs, I guess isn't even necessarily mean male. There's plenty of female archeologists out there.

Sir Ben:

So anyway, I got a have you seen the bug assault, salt guns?

Sir Gene:

Yes. I've played with one of those. I don't think I've ever actually hit a buck though.

Sir Ben:

Oh, well, so, we've had the, since the rain and everything else, we've just had an explosion of flies outside and it's been annoying. So I got one and he and I went on safari and we're hunting and, oh man, he, he got real serious about it real quick and I just, I love it. I love it. I love it.

Sir Gene:

That's cool. You know what apparently what works for flies really well. And I know this from watching a farming YouTube channel that I. Is fly paper.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Fly paper and fly strips.

Sir Gene:

super old tech, but you buy a whole roll of this stuff and then you wrap it inside out. So you're wrapping the sticky side out around a post to create a few square feet of fly paper, basically. And, and this thing outdoors, mind you, this thing cleared out like a hundred by a hundred foot area flies.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. The, so

Sir Gene:

it smells like rotting meat or something. So the flies go right to it.

Sir Ben:

yeah, the, there there's a fly trap that I use that has literally petrified egg in it. That works really well. But you know, like we had a couple flies in the house, so I, you know, at Lowe's there's this high tech refl refractive fly trap and put it up in the, in the dining room and it, it literally has one fly on it yet. The old school fly strip is just full, you know, and everything else. And, you know, we, when we've gotten rid of 'em, but the problem is when your son is the age that he is and leaves the back door standing wide open for periods of time, you know?

Sir Gene:

flies coming in. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well bugs in general, but

Sir Gene:

Well, and this is, this is where I think living in Austin is I really am kind of used to it to the point of not remembering what it was like to not live in Austin. But there's very few bugs because the bat population is huge and they eat all those flying

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Uh, I remember in, you know, living in Minnesota, even in Dallas there was a lot more bugs around

Sir Ben:

Yeah, I never had any bugs in Dallas, but where we're at we're we are really on the edge of town. So literally across the street is hundreds and hundreds. If not thousands of acres of farm land, right. The subdivision we are in is really, really only edge of town. And you know, as a result, you're just not in the concrete jungle. Right. And that's okay. I, I I'll deal with the bugs. I I'm good with that.

Sir Gene:

yeah. I really don't mind bugs, but I also have, other than the backs, I also have a population of spiders and a population of wasps here, like in the house. So they clear out all the bugs from inside.

Sir Ben:

I don't know that I'd want a population of wasps in the house,

Sir Gene:

Well, okay. The Wasser in the garage, they, they're not technically in the house, they're in the garage, but they do have a nest there and I leave it alone. No, I don't. I, I I'm pro man. The only way, the only reason to not have wasps is if you you're keeping honey bees, that's the only reason. But if you don't have honey bees, wasps will take care of the other insect populations. They don't bother me. I don't bother them.

Sir Ben:

Jean is pro predator.

Sir Gene:

That's that's very accurate. I'm I'm a fan of predators. I've always enjoyed having predators as pets. I think this is also why I've been more of a cat person than a dog person

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

because dogs may kill stuff. Accidentally cats will kill stuff on purpose

Sir Ben:

Yeah. They'll also play with their pre,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm which is a sign of intellect, cuz orcas do that dolphins do that.

Sir Ben:

I, I, I actually enjoy both. I have a dog

Sir Gene:

orcas and dolphins. I guess they're one of the same orcas

Sir Ben:

I mean, they're just bigger versions of each other, but sure.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

You know, dolphins, I've talked about it growing up on the Gulf coast and being around a lot of sea

Sir Gene:

of fucking going on

Sir Ben:

Yeah. well yeah.

Sir Gene:

dolphins too. Yep.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And you know, we, the aquarium we had as a kid, you know, we had sea horses and everything else and you know, seeing a male sea horse give birth and then a shrimp coming along and eating 90% of 'em, you know, that sort of stuff. So, I was exposed to the realities of life very early on, you know? And then when we lived in Idaho, we had a little farm and, you know, lots of stuff goes on there too. So yeah.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And it's a, it's amazing how, how much stuff figures out that you're growing plants and wants to eat 'em

Sir Ben:

well, and you know what what's crazy is that the looking back at my childhood and looking at my step kids and looking at the majority of people today, there's no wonder why people go, what do you mean power comes from the wall? What do you mean groceries? Come from the store.

Sir Gene:

from the Uber

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Do you not have any clue about the cycle of life? You know, and it's just, yeah.

Sir Gene:

I'm sure every generation says this and it, and they it's true when they say it, but it certainly is true today is that I think all generations after me just did not have anywhere near the, the grounded, earthy experience that I did

Sir Ben:

Well, but I think that is generationally true

Sir Gene:

yeah, it

Sir Ben:

know, decade over decade, because fundamentally we are moving towards a more civilized culture. Now we may have some economic and geopolitical issues that may take that away, but, you know, life has done nothing, but get easier generation after generation for a very long time.

Sir Gene:

Well, and more removed from actual. You know, manual labor of providing for yourself.

Sir Ben:

Well, but that's the way economic development goes is that you, the more mature the economy, the more specialization you are

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm Yep. And we can get sushi anytime of day or night in Austin, whereby any rights we should not be able to

Sir Ben:

land laxity. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

yeah. Land the city. The only sushi we can have is catfish around the year, but yet

Sir Ben:

Which catfish makes a great ceviche by the way.

Sir Gene:

I've never had catfish ceviche. I always kind of, well, we've had this conversation. You you've told me there's a way to get the, the smell out.

Sir Ben:

Oh, no catfish. Doesn't good. Catfish. Doesn't smell at all.

Sir Gene:

Bottom feeders typically have a, a very kind of

Sir Ben:

Cat catfish is a totally different flesh than most fish. It is a slow Twitch muscle and it is a very different muscular structure. It's, you know, anyway, catfish makes a good ceviche because of the way it firms up under an acid. So,

Sir Gene:

Hmm. Yeah, that would be that would be interesting. I I'd try that. I

Sir Ben:

sometime I'll make you my ceviche

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I like ceviche. I like KU.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

uh, obviously sushi Shemi I like all that stuff. The basically food food. Raw food with some acid's always good.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm yeah,

Sir Gene:

What else did I miss? Where were we about wrapped up?

Sir Ben:

I think we're pretty good.

Sir Gene:

See, I don't watch the news cuz I just have you tell it to me.

Sir Ben:

I, I think that meeting between Putin and G I haven't seen enough analysis of it and it's been ignored in the Western media and that is very con I don't understand why this isn't being lauded up as. The other guys and, oh, look at the evil doers or whatever, we're flat out ignoring it. And that is, I keep asking myself, okay. Why, why? I mean, if anything, this is a good opportunity to say, oh, here's evil, Vladimir Putin, who's invading Russia citing with this Chinese allies. The, you know, I mean, everything we're doing with the stances we're taking in Taiwan with the, everything that we're doing, why are we ignoring that?

Sir Gene:

yeah. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

have an answer, unfortunately, but

Sir Gene:

I think, I think there's a lot of theories flying around in the white house about what to do about various things. And I, I just think a lot of 'em are wrong.

Sir Ben:

and what do you think those theories are?

Sir Gene:

Well, I, I think that there's people that are a hell Ben on strategy not to contain, but to actually destroy Russia.

Sir Ben:

I think the focus of that is China. Not necessarily Russia.

Sir Gene:

I think I, I dunno, man. I think there's a lot of Chinese sympathizers in the white house.

Sir Ben:

Ye not on the military side as much. Anyway, I, I, I don't have sources in the white house, so I'm not gonna speculate, but I, I,

Sir Gene:

Well, none

Sir Ben:

the outward observation,

Sir Gene:

of

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

Go ahead. No, I was just making joke.

Sir Ben:

The outward observation would be that the, the plays we're making the calculus has to be that right now. They think that in a Anglos war, the us wins. And if we wait any longer, we don't

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

we are provoking China and pushing China to the point where it will be an Anglo war.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

And what I mean by that is it will be us. It will be England. It will be Australia, it'll be New Zealand. And that's probably about it against China.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

And hopefully that's the only involvement because if Russia and other, you know, if this devolves truly into world war II, and it isn't just an Anglo sign war, then that's a very different outcome, potential

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. So one thing I was talking to another another Russian agent yesterday and I mean person and

Sir Ben:

So you're talking to CSB. Got it.

Sir Gene:

Uhhuh. And we're talking about the the, the misunderstanding of Putin the west and the, the reality is, you know, in Russia, Putin is a moderate. And when you have all these, these conversations about we, we need to get the people of Russia to want to change their government, to overthrow Putin, to have somebody else. And what I don't think any of these idiots understand is that if that happens, the person coming in won't have a special military operation in Ukraine,

Sir Ben:

Well, they

Sir Gene:

will do a us style war where the first thing you do is you blow up all the electrical equipment. You blow up all the water plants. And you let people live without water and electricity for a few days, no winter. And guess what? Then you just come in and you don't have to do Jack shit to take over, which is what the us has done in every operation that it's had since Vietnam.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Well, you know what? Russia's gonna do that to France and Germany. This winter they're different means.

Sir Gene:

well different means, but, but I mean, this is there's only one person that is holding back a more aggressive stance from Russia towards the west. And that is Putin because the majority of the other political parties in Russia they absolutely want to keep going through Ukraine and into Germany and into Poland because the way that those countries are acting right now after what's happened during world war II is absolutely treasonous to in these people's eyes, 20 million Russians didn't die, fighting Germany so that Germany can send weapons to Ukraine. The Russia didn't agree to give up east Germany to have NATO, not advance any further east and then have NATO advanced way further east.

Sir Ben:

well, and absolutely, and Finland's moves and everything else are extremely provocative. And by the way, regardless of what side you're on, on this, what the fuck good does it to have Finland join NATO? Like even if you're a hundred percent NATO believer in everything else, what do you gain

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

versus the provocation? So, you know, I, I, I, man, I'm an isolationist. I, I think the us really should and is best when you know, it's not involved everywhere else in the world.

Sir Gene:

And also, I think it's one thing to, in the background vs. CIA affect the outcomes of some elections and it's a whole other thing to very publicly be funneling weapons and fighting a proxy war

Sir Ben:

Well, you know, pre-war war II. We were a second tier power at best. And I don't know, I think we were better off,

Sir Gene:

which said we may be a second tier power, but we will fuck you up if you come over here.

Sir Ben:

Well, but it was this part of the world as ours. And that's, Y y'all go over there and do whatever over in Europe where we we've got the new world. This is ours. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And, and we have completely broken that covenant.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I don't know that we have, but

Sir Gene:

We as a country.

Sir Ben:

the politicians have,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Well it, every country gets the politicians they deserve. We may be in a minority. That is the good guys, but the majority clearly wanted these politicians.

Sir Ben:

well, gene, we're not just the good guys.

Sir Gene:

We're also the good old boys

Sir Ben:

exactly

Sir Gene:

and on that note, stay tuned. When we finally start our new show.

Sir Ben:

Uhhuh.