Sir Gene Speaks

0082 Sir Gene Speaks with Dude Named Ben

August 29, 2022 Gene Naftulyev Season 2022 Episode 82
Sir Gene Speaks
0082 Sir Gene Speaks with Dude Named Ben
Show Notes Transcript

I recommend listening at 1.25X

Stay tuned for an invite to my new prepper website!

Weekend Gaming Livestream atlasrandgaming onTwitch
StarCitizen referral code STAR-YJD6-DKF2
Elite Dangerous
Kerbal

Podcast recorded on Descript and hosted on BuzzSprout 

Story Images and Links are only visible to Podcasting 2.0 Apps - see all the latest APPS for Podcasting 2.0

Donate via Bitcoin or Lightning strike.me/sirgene 

Support the show
Sir Gene:

This is sir Jean during me, once again, this is Ben. Ben, when are we gonna get a new name for the podcast?

Sir Ben:

As soon as we can agree on one, man, we need some suggestions.

Sir Gene:

yeah, suggestions are good. I think I've shot down. Just about all the ones you had

Sir Ben:

Yeah,

Sir Gene:

Uhhuh.

Sir Ben:

Thanks.

Sir Gene:

You're welcome. I'm just trying to do my job

Sir Ben:

and, and how much how many suggestions have you come up with?

Sir Gene:

too

Sir Ben:

I that's, that seems like a big number for that, but okay.

Sir Gene:

Just trying to keep, keep it going.

Sir Ben:

how you been

Sir Gene:

I've been busy. I'm like, I'm not working. I'm

Sir Ben:

supposed to be unemployed.

Sir Gene:

Exactly. And I've been freaking busy because I've been meeting with potential clients and, and people I can get me potential clients. So it's been a little, little hectic unplanned, but Hey, I'm not gonna, I'm not gonna not take a meeting with somebody that I may wanna end up working for.

Sir Ben:

So are these like lunch meetings or what

Sir Gene:

lunch dinner, I've spent some fricking good meals.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Who, who who's paying?

Sir Gene:

Not me, which is the best.

Sir Ben:

Hmm. Okay. All right. Interesting, good.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I mean, these are places where the last time I went there with the two people and no drinks, it was 400 bucks.

Sir Ben:

Geez.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Well, yeah.

Sir Gene:

The cost of everything's going up, you know, I, I just kind of did the math in my head the other day, you know, like a dual income family right now where, you know, let's say the, the they're both professionals,

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

that's a $300,000 a year income.

Sir Ben:

ish. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Ish. And

Sir Ben:

I'd say closer to two, but

Sir Gene:

mm, well, the one I'm thinking of is probably over three, but let let's

Sir Ben:

I mean, depending on the level of professional, it could be over five, so

Sir Gene:

could be, it could be, but I'm talking like management. So 150, 180 K a year. Thereabouts

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But I mean, even in big corporations you've got in taxes, at least you've got some manager level positions only at like 120 K a year.

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

So it, it vastly gyrates on

Sir Gene:

two 50. Yeah. But either way, either way, it's up in that range these days

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm,

Sir Gene:

where like dual income family years ago, you know, this is how inflation works used to be a little over a hundred K

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

like maybe 130

Sir Ben:

well, in the late eighties and early nineties, my parents were making around 120. With their, you know, my mom not really working, but running the corporation and you know, that was really good money then

Sir Gene:

It was exactly cars were significantly cheaper

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

along with everything else. But anyway, I don't wanna get stuck on the whole reminisce thing about boy of inflation's really screwed over everybody cuz it, it, I mean, it kind of has, but also salaries have gotten up. So it's really, the only thing that's happened is the dollar's been devalued.

Sir Ben:

well, but salaries have not kept up with inflation though. That's the problem.

Sir Gene:

That is true. That is true.

Sir Ben:

you know, when with our current bout of inflation, they're really not keeping up. And I guess, I don't know if you saw the, some of the bricks announcements on their new banking system that they're setting up

Sir Gene:

no, I I've been kinda unplugged. I mean, I was already prepping to be on vacation. I mean, unemployed and therefore not really keeping up with any news, so fill me in.

Sir Ben:

so I'll, I'll just keep it simple, but we really need to start handling show notes better, and I put in links for what I'm saying, but essentially they are going through and creating their own payment system for not

Sir Gene:

can add footnotes.

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

You can add footnotes

Sir Ben:

Yeah. They're. Oh, Zencaster

Sir Gene:

Yeah, yeah,

Sir Ben:

can it's right now. All I have is the chat though. I don't have the footnote section that's

Sir Gene:

Oh you don't. Oh, okay.

Sir Ben:

Anyway, as I was saying, the

Sir Gene:

Before you started rudely interrupted.

Sir Ben:

the bricks

Sir Gene:

Go right ahead.

Sir Ben:

a competitor

Sir Gene:

tell us what, what you wanna say.

Sir Ben:

So the bricks nations are setting up a competitor swift and this competitor would encompass basically half of the nations on earth. And there are talking about very bluntly saying, Hey, we can, and we'll move this set of trade off the Petro dollar.

Sir Gene:

Amazing. It's taken them this long,

Sir Ben:

well, I mean, it's a pretty big move and it takes a lot to get, you know, a hundred country. Well, you know, 60 countries to make that move. The, the scary thing here is if we, if they all they would really have to add into their current Alliance is Saudi Arabia. And then we're, we're done

Sir Gene:

Oh, that's happening

Sir Ben:

Right? So what

Sir Gene:

when the

Sir Ben:

to inflation? What happens to inflation when half the country's on the face of the earth go, you know what? I don't really need this dollar anymore.

Sir Gene:

no, we know what happens.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. We become third world

Sir Gene:

We are a third world. Yeah. Yeah. We, we become what we deserve to be at this point. The decisions that have been made in government are consistent with a banana Republic right now,

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

rating your political enemies compounds.

Sir Ben:

Well, you know, interesting thing on that, the division of the FBI that did the raid is the same division of the FBI that did crossfire hurricane.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Huh? How interesting is that?

Sir Gene:

well, and then the judge that authorized the raid is the same judge that represented the pedophile.

Sir Ben:

Well, it wasn't a judge at the time and he didn't rep he didn't represent Epstein. He represented Epstein's pilot and some other

Sir Gene:

Oh, whatever the point is, it's all connected. It's a big cabal. That's what I'm saying. It's a cabal, not political advice. So what should we be surprised at all or not really?

Sir Ben:

I don't think we should be surprised. And I don't think we should be surprised, especially with current global tensions that China and Russia are threatening this, but the American people really do need to wake up and understand the reality of the situation

Sir Gene:

No, they'll wake up her right

Sir Ben:

they will. I

Sir Gene:

blows up next to them.

Sir Ben:

well, when when inflation, literally, you know, your money is cut in half it'll be a very interesting day. So, you know, the only, the, the big problem is, is we don't produce a lot here. I mean, we have enough food in. You know, the us, we don't import a whole ton of food, you know, other than fruits and tropical things like that that'll go away. But other than the tropical fruit and things that we are addicted to in our normal lives, our normal grain beef, et cetera, except for the current destruction of said herds and crops, we are capable of feeding ourselves,

Sir Gene:

Mm,

Sir Ben:

you know, right now when you have literally ranchers that I know taking half their herd to slaughter right now, cuz of the water and hay shortage when you have farmers plowing under at least a third of their crops,

Sir Gene:

Yep.

Sir Ben:

not looking great for next year

Sir Gene:

And they still have to pay manta to replant.

Sir Ben:

oh man. Talk about an

Sir Gene:

I mean, bear.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Whatever don't care bear,

Sir Gene:

Yes. We need to pay the Germans to be able to plant crops.

Sir Ben:

Yes. And to use glyphosates that, you know, kill people,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

allegedly,

Sir Gene:

allegedly.

Sir Ben:

you know, I'm,

Sir Gene:

I, I think whether you wanna put it in the in the more religious context and say a day, reckoning is definitely coming for the us.

Sir Ben:

absolutely, you know, it, it's interesting just on the whole Monsanto glyphosate thing. I really try to, I, I don't use Roundup. I don't, I, I refuse to

Sir Gene:

plant enough stuff to even need.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I mean, in, in the flower beds and yeah, there's lots of places where it would be nice.

Sir Gene:

Why would you use it in flower beds? Would you care if, if critters eat your flowers?

Sir Ben:

Roundup is not about critters. It's about weeds.

Sir Gene:

Oh, well, I see. This is how much I plant.

Sir Ben:

Yes. Okay. So right now I've got some nuts edge that is just keeps coming up, keep coming up. And I have fricking tried everything. I've got one more pest one more herbicide to try before I finally break down and use Roundup and I'm hoping to not, but yeah.

Sir Gene:

Why don't you just use pests? Get the, get a bug that eats it.

Sir Ben:

Anyway,

Sir Gene:

Why there's gotta be bugs that eat it.

Sir Ben:

well, it's just a very hearty Africanized African grass that is just a pain in the rear to get rid of. So

Sir Gene:

What's it called? I'm gonna look it up. What's it called?

Sir Ben:

nuts S edge.

Sir Gene:

Nutsack.

Sir Ben:

No, I'll send you a link. Jesus

Sir Gene:

All right. Good enough. It's a Cyprus. ESUs interesting. Okay. And it looks ugly.

Sir Ben:

yeah. I mean, it's just a grass

Sir Gene:

Oh, I know what you need. You need a sheep.

Sir Ben:

Yes, that will also eat the roses and everything

Sir Gene:

Well, okay. But you can fence off the roses, but the wait, the roses, you, this thing is not killing your roses.

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

This thing is not killing off your roses.

Sir Ben:

No, it's just growing in amongst the roses and the other bushes and things

Sir Gene:

But the, how tall does it get?

Sir Ben:

all, if I let it it'll get three feet

Sir Gene:

Really? Okay. I didn't realize that. Yeah. Cause I was gonna say, I mean the best thing to do for roses my dad used to grow those things is just to put a cover the soil with vinyl

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

and uncover the vinyl with rocks or wood chips or something that looks nice. And then the rose just is the only thing sticking through the vinyl.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Have you tried that?

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm the problem is the mulch that the, I had the company re mulch, the flyer beds, cuz we were, I was traveling a lot and didn't have time this spring and apparently the than nets edge was in the mulch. So yeah. Anyway, not good pain in

Sir Gene:

so, okay. You can try rocks

Sir Ben:

Yeah, I'm not redoing the entire flower bed right now. I'll next spring. When it comes to it, I'll remove all the mulch. I'll nuke, everything. I'll put down a weed barrier and then

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

but that that's just not gonna happen. Mid Midsummer

Sir Gene:

No, I hear you. I hear you. It's I, I, when I was young, the all the like roses and

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

what do you call the type of, it's a plant. It's not really a flower. All that stuff had weed barriers. And then with rocks on top, actually. What are the white rocks?

Sir Ben:

Limestone

Sir Gene:

no, no, no, like actual white.

Sir Ben:

gypsum.

Sir Gene:

It's the Flint.

Sir Ben:

Flint's black

Sir Gene:

I'm pretty sure it's white. What, what's the white rock that sparks.

Sir Ben:

Flint sparks, but it's black.

Sir Gene:

Okay. But what's the white thing that sparks.

Sir Ben:

I, I don't know what

Sir Gene:

Anyway, we have those, cause you could just pick up any two rocks kind 'em against each other and you'll get sparks.

Sir Ben:

yeah

Sir Gene:

and then when my parents retired the house, they bought had a fully rocked in yard.

Sir Ben:

no, thank you.

Sir Gene:

So it was all rocks with some areas for plants.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, I like my grass.

Sir Gene:

You like grass, I've never been a fan of grass. I don't like mowing,

Sir Ben:

Yeah, I like grass. I like a nice thick lawn that you can just,

Sir Gene:

honestly. You know, the thing that I, I think looks the nicest that I, maybe it's just a childhood memories is I, I love. The flooring on the inside of tall pine forests where it's just pine needles and nothing else on the bottom, it's just cuz they kill off the grass. So

Sir Ben:

off for the pine needles, the acidity of the pine needles kills off pretty much everything.

Sir Gene:

they look it's like this orange kind of covering that I've really like

Sir Ben:

well, I'll tell you a story. So I was hunting a few years back and I, I shot a

Sir Gene:

you hunting wabbit?

Sir Ben:

no deer, and anyway, I shot this dough. It was on a pipeline on some property I have in these Texas and she F flopped down and like, okay, good hit. Anyway, she got up and walked into the little pine Grove, right beside the I'm like, okay, great. So I wait a little while, let her, you know, bleed out and and the lights failing and I go hunt trying to find her and then fall on the blood trail and all that. But you know, the color of a deer's.

Sir Gene:

Oh yeah. I never

Sir Ben:

those pine needles. I mean, I got the dog area, never found her. It, it was, and I guarantee you, we were within a few feet of her

Sir Gene:

Oh my God. Yeah, the dog didn't find her.

Sir Ben:

Well, he, this, this, my dog at the, this dog at the time, it was my dad's dog was not trained. He was just a dog.

Sir Gene:

He was just walking around with you.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But

Sir Gene:

How do you put the earmuffs on them when you're shooting?

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

How do you put the earmuffs on the dog when you shoot?

Sir Ben:

Why would you do that?

Sir Gene:

Because you're gonna ruin this earring.

Sir Ben:

So,

Sir Gene:

Well, what do you mean? So,

Sir Ben:

I mean, I might hear my, my left ear is D pretty deaf

Sir Gene:

and you consider that a positive thing.

Sir Ben:

No, it's just comes from shooting guns a lot

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. You should be wearing ear protection.

Sir Ben:

and I do now, but you know, as a kid and hunting, I don't wear ear protection.

Sir Gene:

you don't

Sir Ben:

No, the only time I wear ear protections at the range,

Sir Gene:

Oh my God. Well, you're nuts.

Sir Ben:

no, I just need my ears when I'm

Sir Gene:

You're gonna your ears already suck as you're doing this. No, no, no. You ought to be wearing electronic hearing protection. That amplifies sounds and cuts off loud. Sounds.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Cuz then you can hear like a fricking, you know, coyote where you can hear everything for 20 miles around you. You can hear the grass wrestling, you know where to look and then you you're totally safe shooting because it's gonna cut out.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So when I'm

Sir Gene:

shocked. You're a high tech guy. I'm surprised you don't do this.

Sir Ben:

so the only time I wear ear pro hunting is when I'm bird hunting, because bird hunting, you know, I'm not really listening for them. It's much more visual. And I'm gonna be firing multiple rounds, but when I'm deer hunting, it's usually one round.

Sir Gene:

it's 145 decibel round that permanent ear damage. Every time you pull the trigger,

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

ah, I don't get it, dude. You're a smart guy. You, you, you did all that science and math stuff. You gotta be able to calculate it.

Sir Ben:

Huh.

Sir Gene:

Exactly. Huh? That's I, okay. I know what

Sir Ben:

time I wear earbuds. I'm

Sir Gene:

know what to get. I know what to buy you for your birthday.

Sir Ben:

Uhhuh. I mean, I wear earbuds a lot, you know, just walking around the house, listening to stuff. So I, I, man, we, the act of hearing itself is damaging. So

Sir Gene:

okay. Now you're just being hyperbolic. The act of living is death Uhhuh.

Sir Ben:

Well, it's true.

Sir Gene:

it is every minute you're live. It kills you murder. Mer. It kills you more. I was gonna say further. And then I started saying more. So I got Mer or Mer

Sir Ben:

it's a little early in the morning for gene

Sir Gene:

oh, it's super early. You know, we do this at like 4:00 AM. I don't think people realize how early we do this.

Sir Ben:

yeah, yeah. It's 10:00 AM gene. It's 10:00 AM.

Sir Gene:

Well somewhere it's 4:00 AM.

Sir Ben:

Oh yeah.

Sir Gene:

What else is going on in the world?

Sir Ben:

well, I've got a movie review for everybody,

Sir Gene:

Oh, nice. I have not been watching any TV at all for last month.

Sir Ben:

well, so I haven't either. But my son is a huge toy story fan and he loves buzz light ear and

Sir Gene:

a good character.

Sir Ben:

he walks around, you know, if he sees the buzz light ear movie or something like that, buzz light ear buzz light ear. So, okay. You know, I'm aware of the stories that are going on around the lesbian kiss and oh my God. And everything

Sir Gene:

There's a lesbian buzz light ear.

Sir Ben:

there is a lesbian kiss in buzz light ear.

Sir Gene:

What? Okay. Who are the female characters? I don't even remember.

Sir Ben:

So this, this is the spoiler alert for anyone who has not seen it and gives a crap. I'm sorry. I'm not gonna

Sir Gene:

a crab. Being the keyword

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

gives a crab being the keyword there.

Sir Ben:

Right. It, it, I, if you give a crap then fast forward, do whatever, but I, I wanna talk about the subject and it's kid's movie and I don't think it's that important. All right. So the buzz, the entire premise of the movie buzz light year is that. Andy in the original 1995 movie saw a movie ha that buzz light year was in. And that was his favorite movie. And that's why he got the buzz light year toy.

Sir Gene:

Andy's the little kid.

Sir Ben:

Yes. And this is supposed to be that movie. So it's totally outside the toy story universe. It's supposed to be an actual, like sci-fi. Yeah. Yeah. It's an interesting premise that they totally screwed up.

Sir Gene:

Ha

Sir Ben:

But anyway, so this is the story of buzz light ear. Sci-fi not buzz light ear the toy, right?

Sir Gene:

Got it. Got it. So it's a cartoon.

Sir Ben:

Yes. But it's a, you know, I mean the, the premise of the story and everything could have been pretty good,

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

the first 25 minutes of the movie buzz has this partner, this buddy, who's a female. And

Sir Gene:

buddy?

Sir Ben:

like,

Sir Gene:

Like he's in the friend zone,

Sir Ben:

no, like he's a space ranger and she's a space ranger and they're doing this mission together.

Sir Gene:

so, okay. So like a she's his kind of

Sir Ben:

He's the captain. She's the commander

Sir Gene:

course she is. Go ahead.

Sir Ben:

anyway, of course, yeah. Yeah. Black, by the way.

Sir Gene:

A black lesbian commander.

Sir Ben:

yep. So she saves his rear end a couple of times and all that, which is fine. He goes on this mission to try and save them cuz they're stranded and ends up going through time dilation, which their understanding of relativistic time dilation is absolutely asinine.

Sir Gene:

Uhhuh.

Sir Ben:

But regardless, well, I mean, he goes on this flight, that's supposed to be four minutes and he's gonna shoot around the sun and come back to the planet and he's gonna be trying to hit hyper speed and coming back and he time highlights and it, it takes four years.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. That makes sense.

Sir Ben:

No, it doesn't the distance and the speed. No does not.

Sir Gene:

No, because he's, he's slowed down to the point where time barely moves.

Sir Ben:

the, his relative, no, no, no, no, no, no. Anyway, the, he would experience,

Sir Gene:

away from him. You see, you don't understand the finer complexities

Sir Ben:

experience time dilation, but it would not be four years for the planet. I mean the, anyway, it doesn't matter. Moving on the, that's a different critique of the movie, but as soon as he comes back, she's met someone and in their initial conversation, she's like, yeah, I met someone and he, without a beat says, oh, who is she? Like totally normal, no chance of it being a male.

Sir Gene:

he knew he was a lesbian that he was working with.

Sir Ben:

but it's the, it's it, it it's the, the, the most, the most insidious part of this that I found was just the absolute normalization of it. And they go through and he does these missions and it's a four year hop, four year hop, four year hop, and it's kind of a montage and her life is evolving and it's a major focus of every time he returns and, you know, one time she's pregnant, never addresses, you know, Hey, how did that happen? Because you know, two

Sir Gene:

Virgin birth,

Sir Ben:

exactly. But you know, who knows men can get pregnant too.

Sir Gene:

you know, zoos has come down from the mountain and impregnated with plenty of women.

Sir Ben:

Uhhuh, anyway, the montage keeps going until finally she's dead and gone and you know, he's still going. And the kiss was the least insidious part of this movie because the kiss could have been a greeting kiss between two friends. The kiss does not bother me.

Sir Gene:

There's no tongue visible.

Sir Ben:

well, it's just a Peck and the, but the whole focus on the lesbian relationship and the very

Sir Gene:

the whole movie is basically about the lesbian relationship.

Sir Ben:

The first 25 minutes, it, it gets worse though. So the, he ends. Finding the solution, which the solution is a rainbow colored crystal and all the regular colored crystals never worked, but the rainbow color one is the one that works and it's gonna save them. So that's an interesting little subplot line there

Sir Gene:

oh, I can imagine how somebody came up with that

Sir Ben:

yeah, exactly. There's an emotional support animal

Sir Gene:

No.

Sir Ben:

in the form of a robot cat. That also is the one that comes up with the solution, by the

Sir Gene:

The robot cat. That actually makes sense.

Sir Ben:

How so?

Sir Gene:

Well, it's a combination of the two best things you can have cats and robots.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Which by the way, totally makes R two D two noises and other things and

Sir Gene:

Mm. Well, they do own the franchise.

Sir Ben:

So then get away with it. But you know,

Sir Gene:

can, I don't know if somebody's been sued for that boo boo beep noises.

Sir Ben:

I wouldn't be surprised given Lucas',

Sir Gene:

Huh.

Sir Ben:

but anyway, so he, he's got this emotional support cat and then

Sir Gene:

Now how do we know? It's an emotional support

Sir Ben:

because it is literally given to him to help him deal with after the first four year jump, the, the, the whole stress of I I've missed out on four years of my life,

Sir Gene:

is there a reason he keeps going every four years, like this,

Sir Ben:

cuz he wants to get them off this planet cuz they've crashed land.

Sir Gene:

Oh, but wait, if they crash landed, how did she marry somebody?

Sir Ben:

Because it's a whole big ship. It's not just those two,

Sir Gene:

But he's in a separate ship

Sir Ben:

he's flying a little experimental, like think of, you know, an X craft to try

Sir Gene:

his solution to save them is to outlive them all.

Sir Ben:

No, he's te trying different fuel crystal types to try and get them back off the planet. Cuz they destroyed their fuel crystal

Sir Gene:

Oh, so.

Sir Ben:

trying to remanufacture it.

Sir Gene:

they're they need di lithium spheres is what you're saying.

Sir Ben:

It's not what they call it in the movie, but sure.

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Sir Ben:

Anyway so there's the emotional support animal. He ends up running into her granddaughter in the future and which, you know, that's a whole thing. And she talks about, you know, her grandmas and you know, all this and just yeah, great normal. And there's no discussion of her parentage whatsoever, which that's interesting in of itself. And then she's a screw up and everything else, but they've gotta fix it. And Zurg the evil emperor ZG is in here and It it's a version of light year that's ZG. So there's a paradox that's created through the time travel. And one version of buzz becomes Zerg who wants to erase go back in time and erase all of this. And there's the version of buzz that's like, but then she wouldn't have met her and they, they, they wouldn't have had this life. No, I have to defend that life. So, okay. Remove all the suffering and all the people who have died on this hard planet that you crash landed on and, you know, fix everything, change the timeline to something not horrible or no, we can't touch the timeline, not because of any moral reason, but because my friend wouldn't have found her lesbian lover anyway, the whole movie is just woke and it is really a case of go go woke, go broke. I mean, they barely covered their budget. It

Sir Gene:

That is horrible. I mean, not the budget part, but the story you just described, it's pretty crappy.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm It is. And it could have been a good one.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. They could have just knocked off a star Trek episode

Sir Ben:

They could have.

Sir Gene:

that would've been better. So I'm, so he goes flying around the sun to test some crystal and then he goes back in time with the crystal.

Sir Ben:

No zer goes back in time with the crystal. So Zurg is his evil counterpart.

Sir Gene:

So the intelligent one. Got

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

the Z character is him.

Sir Ben:

Yes

Sir Gene:

Oh, that's that's a plot twist.

Sir Ben:

it is. And it's a sucking one. And you know, they could have done it differently. They could have handled everything. It's just, yeah, it's ridiculous.

Sir Gene:

Do you watch, or have you watched raised by wolves?

Sir Ben:

I have not,

Sir Gene:

Have you heard of.

Sir Ben:

no,

Sir Gene:

I'm trying to remember what channel it's on. I think it's on Amazon eventually. But it's a, sci-fi sort of psychological philosophical series done by Ridley Scott. You know who he is?

Sir Ben:

I guess I know who red Scott is. I'm a big

Sir Gene:

checking. I don't know what kind of sci-fi person you are. So

Sir Ben:

I am a anyway, so just real quick, before we get off the light ear topic, they had a production budget of 200 million. They had a domestic box office of 118 million.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

They had a worldwide box office of only 218 million. So talk about a flop.

Sir Gene:

yeah, that's pretty crap. That's good. I mean, you know, it was good

Sir Ben:

Ridley Scott and raised by wolves.

Sir Gene:

yeah, you should check it out if you haven't seen it is. It is in a good sense, disturbing

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

in the same way that alien is disturbing,

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

meaning

Sir Ben:

only alien movies, what's the best one.

Sir Gene:

I think the first one

Sir Ben:

No aliens. The second one,

Sir Gene:

really why.

Sir Ben:

it just is way better

Sir Gene:

Okay. And I'm not sure in what way?

Sir Ben:

because it's not. Yeah,

Sir Gene:

Cause it has an S and end

Sir Ben:

yeah, no, it's just, it, it's a more complete movie to me, you know? The first one's good. Don't get me wrong,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

you know, there's the first one should have been probably about an hour longer than it was. If

Sir Gene:

yes.

Sir Ben:

to tell a more

Sir Gene:

agree with that. I think the storyline and the first one seemed more probable to me than the second one,

Sir Ben:

Why is that

Sir Gene:

because they were going on a mission that had nothing to do with aliens.

Sir Ben:

correct?

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Right there. it's more

Sir Ben:

then they found some and, you know, but they should have, there should have been more detail around that, you know? But the second one to me is plausible because, you know, they, they send a colony to that planet and Hey, yeah, you should have learned from our first movie here, bub.

Sir Gene:

yeah. That exactly. Somebody didn't watch. The first movie is what it sounds like to me.

Sir Ben:

Well, I mean, the corporation that they describe in that movie is which I really wish they would've gone into more detail about really what that structure is. And it's only in the ancillary universe that you learn anything

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

But the corporation that they describe in those movies definitely is the evil Corp that would go and try and find and weapon weaponize that Xeno form,

Sir Gene:

Well, of course the same people that doing genetic experiments in Ukraine.

Sir Ben:

the same people who are doing genetic experiments on us now,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

anyway,

Sir Gene:

makes total sense. What was the corporation name

Sir Ben:

I don't even remember, man.

Sir Gene:

you don't remember?

Sir Ben:

Ah, it's been a long time since I watched the alien movies.

Sir Gene:

I guess raced by Wellsville was HBO. I forgot that it was HBO.

Sir Ben:

Done some good stuff.

Sir Gene:

yeah. Yeah, they have, but I would recommend you watch. I would be very curious to get your take on it because it is I'll give you the premise without spoiling anything. There is a, a spaceship that leaves a ravaged earth with a couple of Androids and a handful of embryos and stasis for a new world to recolonize the world with humans.

Sir Ben:

Interesting,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And this happens after the great religious wars. So the two factions on the earth are the atheists and the religious zealots.

Sir Ben:

Which, you know, it'll be interesting to see if that ever comes. Did, did you watch the Peterson interview with the ambassador under Trump that was working on the Abraham Accords

Sir Gene:

I don't recall. I just watched a little bit of the Peterson interview with Lex the other day,

Sir Ben:

with who?

Sir Gene:

Lex.

Sir Ben:

Okay. Not sure who L is.

Sir Gene:

You kidding? You don't watch those.

Sir Ben:

Don't watch what

Sir Gene:

The the Lex Freeman interviews.

Sir Ben:

I, I, I I'm

Sir Gene:

Oh, I thought we talked about it.

Sir Ben:

interview, but I don't know who that is.

Sir Gene:

Well, Le Lex is a, okay, so I'm, I'm surprised a little bit here. Lex is a 20 something millennial dude. He may be 30 by now, but he was he's a AI expert. He was teaching at MIT and started I can't remember if he was on Joe Rogan or if he met Joe Rogan or something, but anyway, he started doing his own podcast of doing long form interviews. And at this point, he has surpassed Rogan in terms of the people that are coming on to do interviews. The, for the most part, the quality of the interviews is really good. So I think he's sort of like the, the disciple of Joe Rogan, if you will. And Joe, Rogan's a good friend of, they both live here in town, so they're, they both moved here to town. I should say he used to live in Massachusetts and used to live in California, but the last episode of the life's Freeman podcast is Jordan Peterson.

Sir Ben:

So, no, I was listening to Peterson's podcast. I I'll have to go and look at licks Friedmans then,

Sir Gene:

Peterson puts out a shit ton of stuff these days.

Sir Ben:

he ever since he joined daily wire.

Sir Gene:

They actually pay him for content and he's generating content.

Sir Ben:

Yep. And it's all been really good stuff lately, too. But anyway, he, his interview with the guy that was behind Jared Kushner and the Abraham Accords,

Sir Gene:

Mm.

Sir Ben:

Or David David Friedman. Anyway, it's a pretty interesting story to see how the Abraham

Sir Gene:

This must be a relative of Lexus.

Sir Ben:

maybe anyway that is, you know, just a pretty common

Sir Gene:

Friedman

Sir Ben:

name. And when I say assumed name, I'm talking generations back, but anyway, the, the story basically goes, you know, Trump being as matter of fact, as he was and really pushing the envelope, like there was a story he told, and I didn't even really recognize this, that he was leaving Saudi Arabia on in his first year as president. And they all told him, Hey, you've gotta stop. And Riyad why. We're going to Israel. Yeah. But you can't fly from, you know, Saudi Arabia to Israel directly. You just can't do that. He said, why the fuck can't I, I, you know, I didn't understand

Sir Gene:

of the United States. God damn. I'm gonna do whatever I fucking want.

Sir Ben:

exactly. So he said, no, let's ask the king. So Trump asked, you know, the king of Saudi Arabia, Hey, can I just do this? And the king said, yes. And that was a first step towards this whole piece process that is still in place and still really working. And, you know, it, it, it, the, they really made it pretty simple and it's, the us should take the, the basis of this Abraham Accords. And it should be, we should have this tri lateral relationship with every nation on earth, the basis being, we respect your sovereignty. So this would, this would pretty much the, the coming third world war by saying, okay, you know, two parties that are at odds, you know, us in China and third neutral party. We're going to respect each other's sovereignty. Here's some things we're gonna give up. Here's some economic things and incentives. We're gonna lay on the table. Okay. Cool. Normalize relations. Would be huge. Anyway, it's a, it's a, it's definitely worth a listen for anyone who is interested in such things.

Sir Gene:

Cool. And then you will provide me with a link. I gather

Sir Ben:

Sure.

Sir Gene:

that I

Sir Ben:

I already

Sir Gene:

in the show notes.

Sir Ben:

more than, you know, a while back, but

Sir Gene:

Oh, you did?

Sir Ben:

Let, let me go back and

Sir Gene:

Yeah, you didn't, I'm looking at it. I don't see it. Nothing in the chat at

Sir Ben:

our chat on signal buddy there.

Sir Gene:

Oh, oh. I'm supposed to be, how many chats are we doing here? Come on. Come on, man.

Sir Ben:

we need our own select channel.

Sir Gene:

Alright. Yes, I see it in the slack channel. Cool. Alright. We done talking about raised by wolves so people can check that out and if somebody's watched it let us well, let Ben know what you think.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Yeah, dude named ben.com. Apparently since you know,

Sir Gene:

Does anyone ever send

Sir Ben:

I'm my email address, isn't in the show notes. Billy bones sent us a note and he had to wait till I mentioned my email again.

Sir Gene:

ah, you couldn't replay an episode?

Sir Ben:

eh, whatever

Sir Gene:

Not a lazy dude.

Sir Ben:

yeah, he didn't wanna have to go looking for

Sir Gene:

All right. And so he sends you something. He didn't send me anything

Sir Ben:

Okay. Well anyway, he, he, he just sent us a nice little note here. He he came up with a couple topics that he wanted to comment on. The first one was the battle of Athens post war II, where some returning soldiers took back over a town that was corrupted,

Sir Gene:

in Georgia,

Sir Ben:

history of that. I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

in Georgia

Sir Ben:

Athens, Tennessee.

Sir Gene:

now, Tennessee. Well, there's Athens, Georgia. There's also Athens Greece.

Sir Ben:

Yes. And there's also a Paris, Texas. What's your point?

Sir Gene:

Well, I don't know what the hell you, you mean by Athens? You have to clarify what city that

Sir Ben:

The battle of Athens though, this is a history thing.

Sir Gene:

There's a battle of Athens and the Greece as well.

Sir Ben:

I'm sure there's more than one battle of Athens agrees

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

here. I'll send you the link

Sir Gene:

so what do you have to say about it?

Sir Ben:

Well, I, if I wasn't so rudely interrupted.

Sir Gene:

Oh my God.

Sir Ben:

The first one

Sir Gene:

yourself.

Sir Ben:

in the morning Sur named Ben. Anyway, he goes on to, I'm not gonna read this verbatim, but the first one more enjoyable topic, the battle of Athens to, to sea in a nutshell, Billy bones rights in 1946, world war II veterans came home to discover their towns, ballot boxes had been stuffed and they weren't going to take it. They took up arms and overtook the governor's mansion, locked him in jail. And I forgot off the top of my head, the number of injured, but yeah, so they literally, this was around election hearing and stuffing ballot boxes and a group of world war II veterans, literally citizen arrested the governor and said, yeah, no, we're not gonna do this. So that's an interesting topic that everyone should

Sir Gene:

wait the governor or the mayor.

Sir Ben:

He said governor, but I think he met mayor

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Sir Ben:

anyway, the last topic, he backs you up on the trends in porn discussion. We were having the other day and apparently I'm just not watching the right stuff here. But he also points out a book that was going through and saying and normalizing incest. And the book was called my body is growing a, a guide for children. And it's a target ages is four to eight.

Sir Gene:

Jesus. Grace.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So. Anyway appreciate the feedback, Billy bones. It was a good email. Really appreciate it. And yeah, I just wanted to touch on those couple of things.

Sir Gene:

Cool. Yeah, no, it's I'll have to add your email to the show notes. I, I hadn't even occurred to me that anybody would bother sending either one of us or anything. So

Sir Ben:

well, regardless. So I, I think the theme of this episode so far really has been what we're normalizing our children to. Right. And as much as I like the show bluey,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

my, my

Sir Gene:

another kid's show I imagine.

Sir Ben:

yeah, it's actually a pretty good one and it's out of Australia of all places.

Sir Gene:

Oh no.

Sir Ben:

But they had this episode called phones or

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

it's in the new season watched it with my son and the grandpa comes over and the girls are playing phones. So they've drawn phones on paper and they're acting like they have a smart phone and he's supposed to sit and they're playing restaurant and he's supposed to order and they're gonna deliver his food and all this. And he is just like, what the fuck is this? He keeps trying to go. And like, I'm here to pick up the food or all the they're like, no, grandpa, you're not doing it. Right. And it's like, oh my God, how sad of a civilization? Is it that, yes, that is our life.

Sir Gene:

To pick up food.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Or to have it delivered or, you know, you like having your groceries delivered instead of going to the grocery store

Sir Gene:

know I did it both yesterday. In fact, I had my groceries delivered and then an hour later I went to the grocery store.

Sir Ben:

Why did they miss

Sir Gene:

I don't know. No, I was just bored.

Sir Ben:

I'm bored. I'm gonna go to the grocery store. See, usually when I'm bored.

Sir Gene:

around there. You can watch humans.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

I mean, you know, others like me is what I meant.

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry, say that again.

Sir Gene:

you know, human people.

Sir Ben:

Did you say like you,

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

it, I didn't know. You're human gene.

Sir Gene:

No, well, I I'm totally human. Everybody should not consider anything else. Being the case. my age. That was standing.

Sir Ben:

Mm. Yeah. You're like what 102

Sir Gene:

what I'm 27. What are you talking about? Trying to make me seem old?

Sir Ben:

you wouldn't even date a 27 year old. What are you talking about?

Sir Gene:

That's true. Well, I didn't date a 27 year old when I was 27 either.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

I'll tell you when I did date a 27 year old. It didn't happen once I was 19 when I was 19, I, my girlfriend was 20.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. You know what? I can totally see gene being one of those guys. It's like, you know what I love about high school chicks. I keep getting older and they stay the same age.

Sir Gene:

College chicks college chicks. Yes. Yes, indeed. Yes.

Sir Ben:

close enough.

Sir Gene:

do stay the same age. I mean, the college chicks are the same age.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

you know, I only say the things that other people don't dare to

Sir Ben:

You and me both. But you know, at the same

Sir Gene:

and Matthew McConney

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm or really more like link, link letter writing it,

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm anyway. So what have you been up to other than your business meetings? My friend

Sir Gene:

I've been eating a lot of expensive meals and and you know, having meetings, talking to people talking to a company that does space stuff, which I definitely wanna get involved in,

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

uh, talking to another company that does health stuff that could have some work for me talked to a couple other guys. So it was, it was a fairly busy week that I was planning on being off, but turned out not to be the case. That's all right.

Sir Ben:

you've rearranged your Mexico trip.

Sir Gene:

I did I'm

Sir Ben:

you're setting up the drug run.

Sir Gene:

so because, oh my God. So, because I was damn I'm lazy or slow to buy my airplane ticket, I ended up buying a full price ticket. The advantage of that is of course I can literally move it to any day with no penalties. And I, so I've taken full advantage of that

Sir Ben:

what airline.

Sir Gene:

American

Sir Ben:

Okay. I can't stand American

Sir Gene:

that's where my miles are at.

Sir Ben:

Really?

Sir Gene:

Yep.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I, when I lived in DFW, I was forced to use American,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

I've always, I was a continental guy until the United merger and I've stuck with United cuz

Sir Gene:

I prefer American over United. I like continental over both of 'em, but I prefer American over United.

Sir Ben:

why.

Sir Gene:

I think that the the service is better. So keep in mind, everything I say relating to, or for is applicable from a first class perspective,

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

I am phone coach in 20 years.

Sir Ben:

Well good for you. I haven't flown first class, so

Sir Gene:

so when I say an airline is better than another one, it has to do with either quality of food or service in first class.

Sir Ben:

well I play I fly coach, so yeah,

Sir Gene:

Oh, well, so you probably fly Southwestern

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm I can't stand Southwest. Hell. No, I, I like United. I like United because I have enough, a little bit of status still with them. And it's enough that I get early bored. I get some upgrades and, you know, I get to put my bags and not have to worry about it. And

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

So do you always travel with a roller bag? Let's say you're going on like a two day trip? What do you, what's your

Sir Gene:

I always travel with the carryon.

Sir Ben:

That

Sir Gene:

I don't have anything other than the carryon.

Sir Ben:

Right, but are you always using a wheeled bag as a

Sir Gene:

Yeah, of course my,

Sir Ben:

Well, see, so some of my business trips take me to like, you know, Tulsa or Oklahoma, so,

Sir Gene:

they don't have wheels there.

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

I'm sorry. I've said they don't, they don't have wheels. You can't use wheels in Tulsa.

Sir Ben:

Nope. The plane that goes from Houston to Tulsa, you literally have to gate check your carry on roller bag.

Sir Gene:

Okay. And,

Sir Ben:

I, I recently added a, basically a leather duffle bag to my travel equipment for the purpose of, I don't wanna fricking wait and check gate, check that bag anymore. It's a pain in the rear, especially when you're only going for one or two days.

Sir Gene:

if you're doing a day trip, you might as well do a backpack.

Sir Ben:

Well, I've got my backpack, but that's full of other things

Sir Gene:

Oh,

Sir Ben:

that always get me searched at the airport.

Sir Gene:

So you, you carry your equipment in your backpack.

Sir Ben:

Oh yeah,

Sir Gene:

Oh, okay. I have just like a computer bag for that.

Sir Ben:

No, I, my, my laptop and all my full kit is in my backpack, which I'm carrying less than I used to. So when I was, you know, liable to be walking into a power plant and, you know, reconfiguring things or actually doing something like that the amount of equipment that I would take and you know, that that's a totally different story.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Now it's far paired down, you know? So

Sir Gene:

well, I I just did that. I've kind of paired down myself a little bit. I took three cables outta my bag the other day.

Sir Ben:

I, I, you know, I, I, since my peak traveling around the country, going to power plant days, I took out a lot of stuff. I mean, I used to have, you know, fluke meters in there for troubleshooting things. I had, you know, various network cards and just lots of add-ons lots of cables, you know? I wouldn't fly with the scissors, but I'd fly with crimpers at times. And, you know, just anyway, that BA when I was really at my peak travel, going around the country, doing stuff, that bag got me searched every fricking time I went through TSA.

Sir Gene:

no that's pain in the ass.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. You've got a lot of stuff in

Sir Gene:

you could put everything into clear bags.

Sir Ben:

Oh, yeah. I had actually mesh bags. So the backpack I have, you know, has some Velcro places and some mesh bags and things like that to make it real clear to 'em. But anytime they put it through the x-ray, they had to do a secondary search cuz of just all the junk in there,

Sir Gene:

bought any new guns.

Sir Ben:

new. But I am looking at optics, I'm looking at optics for my so I, I I've decided thanks to you. You, you got me off my Duff and I'm doing constitutional carry. I never did concealed carry because I never wanted to have the license before. And you know, you, you made me rethink of, well, why aren't you doing this? So I've really been going down that road. And you know, it's it's interesting to have to look out for signs now and, you know, think of the places you're going and wardrobe choices on printing and everything else. And I've got a new holster on order. The one I have currently as a little bulky and I need something a little thinner, but I'm gonna be carrying the M 17 and looking at optics for it. So if anyone has some experience with pistol mounted optics, cuz I quite frankly do not. I've always just shot iron sights on a pistol, but

Sir Gene:

I think you really only have two choices on that.

Sir Ben:

No, I totally disagree. I, I think there are lots of good choices for optics. There are people who are, it's either Le uphold Delta point pro or Tricon RMR. Those are your only two

Sir Gene:

It's I think tri is one of 'em also, since you have a SIG SIG actually makes an optic for that

Sir Ben:

Yes they do. And so here's what I'm looking at. The, the two optics that will fit on that gun right now, out of the box, no adapter plate are the SIG Romeo one pro and the Leopold Delta point pro. Now the Leopold, I would be immediately drawn to over the SIG, just because I've owned a ton of Leopold optics, and they've never disappointed me, but the battery life distance difference is so drastic

Sir Gene:

definitely go with a SIG on that account. Yeah. Or you could go with Tricon and have something better.

Sir Ben:

yeah, the Tricon requires you the modification of the slider and adapter plate and the Tricon the Romeo and the Delta point have really big windows. And that's interesting to me. A lot of people are telling me not to discount Hollon, which Hollon is Chinese. You know, it's China

Sir Gene:

it is, but, but they're, they're really good knockoffs of everything else.

Sir Ben:

That's what everyone says is for the price that they are fantastic optics.

Sir Gene:

I would not go with them just only for the simple reason of not sending money to China, but I don't think the quality is an issue there from what I've seen of. They're actually pretty good.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And they, they even incorporate some solar cells and things

Sir Gene:

Yeah. They, they have more solar options than any other.

Sir Ben:

Yes, they do. And it, you know, it's okay. But no I'm leading, I'm really heavily leaning towards the S Romeo one pro

Sir Gene:

Yeah, just get it. It's not that expensive.

Sir Ben:

no, it's not, but I, I just, it's one of those things that I'm not gonna buy and swap out a bunch of optics on this gun. I wanna make the right choice. So anyway, if anyone has any recommendations or reasons why I shouldn't get

Sir Gene:

recommendations.

Sir Ben:

You know, I, I, I'm just not like that gene, I, you know, have a wife to answer to on purchases and things like that, you know, so,

Sir Gene:

you have a wife and dude it's 300 bucks. Just buy it.

Sir Ben:

I mean, by the time I'm done with it, getting the options, I want,

Sir Gene:

Now. Would you get the three MOA or the six MOA

Sir Ben:

that's another good question.

Sir Gene:

I go for the six MOA.

Sir Ben:

so if I want to, it, it, this gun,

Sir Gene:

It's not a target again.

Sir Ben:

exactly, you know, this is, this is gonna be a carry gun. This is gonna be a defense gun, six Mo a I think is the way to go.

Sir Gene:

Yep. I think so.

Sir Ben:

Yep. And, you know,

Sir Gene:

Yeah, it's waterproof. IPX seven six, my 1632 battery,

Sir Ben:

20,000 hours of battery life,

Sir Gene:

which is basically forever.

Sir Ben:

It's got motion sense on it and all that. So when it's sitting on the dresser at night, when I'm not wearing it, it's off

Sir Gene:

Well, so you're, you're questioning about that being 300 and $350 looks like is the retail so pre you probably get it for three. So I, I just did the the estimated charge on my two scopes from Trijicon

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

to get the Tridium replaced.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Any, any

Sir Ben:

And please tell me where you see the flat dark earth, six MOA, or the black for that matter six hour Romeo, one pro for 300 bucks, cuz the cheapest I founded is 400 and then you gotta add in the steel shroud, which is another 60

Sir Gene:

SIG directly. It's 3 54. So I guarantee you can find it for the black one. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Yeah,

Sir Gene:

Oh, you want the, the other color?

Sir Ben:

I will just to match the gun was my thought. I really don't care that

Sir Gene:

do have to pay more money for the other colors.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Anyway,

Sir Gene:

Yep. But,

Sir Ben:

can find the black six MOA for 300 bucks, let me know where.

Sir Gene:

so you would buy the black one for 300?

Sir Ben:

Yeah, absolutely.

Sir Gene:

No, I thought you wanted to match color.

Sir Ben:

I I'm not that picky, man. Jesus

Sir Gene:

No, I'm not even gonna tell you where you should match color. Nope.

Sir Ben:

gee, thanks friend.

Sir Gene:

You're welcome, friend. I'm gonna make you not look stupid.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

All right. So, yeah, so just for, for two scopes to get them serviced, which is a about once every 10 year service is going to cost me $850.

Sir Ben:

okay. I mean, that's the cost of a scope.

Sir Gene:

Nope. That's, that's certainly less than the cost of a scope, but, well, a

Sir Ben:

on the scope.

Sir Gene:

depends on the scope. It's probably the cost of like four Victor scopes or whatever vector Victor. What, what is that company call starts with a V vortex. That's the one.

Sir Ben:

Vortex has come a long way, man. I could not stand their first generation stuff, but I, I, I gotta tell you the, this new generation stuff they're doing pretty good. They've got really good glass. They've got a great warranty.

Sir Gene:

I just, I like using scopes that are made for actual scope use, meaning, meaning their they're battle tested and made to army standards.

Sir Ben:

yeah. So first of all, I don't put a scope on most semiautomatics you know, I've so I, I don't know. I, I think that there are some good optics out there,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

whatever.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, so I gotta get those through service and then I can't find my. My Tricon handgun optic. I seem to have misplaced it.

Sir Ben:

so like on my SOCOM 16, M one a I've got a a low power variable scope on there. That's you know, zero to six or one to six power and it's a vortex and it's been good to me. I've got a vortex on one bolt gun. Everything else is either Leopold or Nikon. Cuz I did like a lot of the Nikon products,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

um, just cuz Nikon had such great glass, but yeah, I, I don't have any Tricon anything. It's just never, I, I don't, I don't go spend three or four grand on a rifle. That's just not me when I can get a rifle and scope for around two that I can do everything that 90% of people can do with the three or four grand rifle. You know,

Sir Gene:

well, but see here's the difference is I only have one gun per caliber.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

You have multiple guns per caliber.

Sir Ben:

Usually yes,

Sir Gene:

yeah. So in aggregate, you're spending the same amount of money as I am,

Sir Ben:

but I have more guns.

Sir Gene:

but you have more guns and have you, have you purchased more hands in arms?

Sir Ben:

well, I have more than just me

Sir Gene:

Well, okay. So if you break it into a family situation, then yes, of course. Do you need to arm the whole family? Not just yourself.

Sir Ben:

under certain circumstances. Absolutely.

Sir Gene:

That's true.

Sir Ben:

And you, you have different guns in the same caliber for different purposes. So for instance, 3 0 8, I've got 2, 3 0 8 battle rifles that I could choose depending on what sort of scenario I'm going into. One being an AR 10, one being my SOCOMM 16 which the AR 10 has, you know, iron sites and scope the M one a, like I said, has a, essentially a zero to six power variable. And then, you know, I've got my Begar bolt action, 3 0 8 that, you know, that's a thousand yard gun all day long. So

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm yeah, I've got I've got a hunting 3 0 8 and I have a,

Sir Ben:

you've got the divorce.

Sir Gene:

I got two war 3 0 8. That's the only 3 0 8. I got

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Now the real question is if I really want to go out and hit something hard at a thousand yards, that's the, that's the 300 rum. That's when that 300 rum comes out,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

man, that, that, that cartridge is, you know, people talk about 3 30, 8 lap and everything. They're essentially the same cartridge, just the 3 38 Lupu is necked up to a 3 38 versus 300 rum is at 30 caliber. So when you're talking about velocity, the, the velocities you can get out of that gun is just insane. I mean, you know, anyway, so yeah, when you can push a 150 grand projectile over 3000 feet per second, that's pretty, pretty awesome

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I, I guess, I don't know. What do you use it for?

Sir Ben:

hunting, target practice anything in north America that I want.

Sir Gene:

Okay. Have you hunted anything bigger than the deer with it?

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Elk.

Sir Gene:

Oh, okay. Well that's, that's reasonable. So how big of an elk have you gotten down?

Sir Ben:

I'm trying to remember the, you talking about weight or what?

Sir Gene:

Sure.

Sir Ben:

Fairly large cow elk, Idaho. I, I don't remember the exact

Sir Gene:

trying to think of how much meats involved in those

Sir Ben:

a lot.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I would think that would be a lot of meat. So now I sent you two photos here, which nobody can see except for you, cuz we don't have video. And one shows a a SIG with the SIG site that's match color

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

and the other one is of a retarded person's gun now.

Sir Ben:

there's black furniture on the gun too. So it doesn't look that bad.

Sir Gene:

can I, can I encourage you not to be retarded?

Sir Ben:

sure Jean,

Sir Gene:

Okay, good.

Sir Ben:

because the gun is such a fashion statement after all,

Sir Gene:

Well, if there's a reason you chose that color, it must be

Sir Ben:

I chose that color because I wanted a manual safety and that's the color it came in. So the SIG P three 20 is the only ones that have the manual safety are the M 17 and M 18. And they come in the flat dark earth because that's what the army wanted. So, you know, and people are, you know, this is a, this is a subject that is a, people will think I'm nuts, but I like a manual safety. It's just the way I grew up. It's what I have always had. And for me carrying a gun, which I've always opened, carried, you know, hunting, I've always had a pistol on me, stuff like but carrying a gun with one in the chamber, which if I'm carrying a gun, there's gonna be one in the chamber. It needs to be unsafe. That's just ingrained in me from my dad. So.

Sir Gene:

Yep. Well, the, the 1911 absolutely has to have manual safety because of its design. The more modern guns, like a. Do not

Sir Ben:

And why do you think that

Sir Gene:

because there are mechanisms to prevent accidental discharge in these guns, like Glocks the Nuss the XDS that didn't exist in 1911

Sir Ben:

yeah, here here's the thing. So when I go to draw a gun and practice a draw stroke,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

one of the reasons why I like to have a safety is I go to pull that I, you know, discipline making sure my finger doesn't go into the trigger or housing until I'm coming level. And as I'm coming level, I flick that thumb safety down and my trigger finger goes in at the same time. If for whatever reason, something I'm rehosting, whatever I've got that safety,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

there is no way. Even if something bumps that trigger, I'm gonna have an accidental discharge. And when you look at the accident rates and the re holster rates, and it, part of that is 100% people using crappy leather holsters that they haven't broken in correctly, or that doesn't have a good trigger guard and things like that. A lot of the problem is the holster,

Sir Gene:

no, there's another problem, which is something that in the training that I've been to, they really push, which is you never re holster at high speed. A re ster is a gentle movement.

Sir Ben:

and it should be a very deliberate paying attention to it movement a hundred percent and people make mistakes, but I, I just, a physical safety is something I like personally

Sir Gene:

I get it. So you were willing to get a gun in a desert 10 or whatever the color that's called

Sir Ben:

flat dark

Sir Gene:

the safety. Yeah. Flat dark earth.

Sir Ben:

Cuz I'm not worried about the, the guns, the gun, the guns colored means nothing to me. You know, it really doesn't.

Sir Gene:

Well, what do you, what kinda uniform do you wear when you shoot?

Sir Ben:

I, I uniform

Sir Gene:

A

Sir Ben:

do you think I'm a Harper?

Sir Gene:

That would go well with that particular color again.

Sir Ben:

I don't LARP Jean

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

no, that's true. That's

Sir Ben:

when you go to the range, do you you know, wear your plate carrier and all that

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Range clothes. You wear a range clothes. So you put on a t-shirt that has

Sir Ben:

and a t-shirt

Sir Gene:

I usually put on a Glock hat and like a t-shirt that has something about guns and like, you know, your freedom.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

I don't wear those clothes anywhere else.

Sir Ben:

why not?

Sir Gene:

Cause that that's range clothes.

Sir Ben:

Nah, nah,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

I'm I'm the kind of guy that I. I'm constantly on customer calls and everything. And I will be wearing with my company, you know, a t-shirt's fine or whatever, and I'll be wearing something, you know, like, this is why we can't have nice things and it's gotta picture of Congress and, you know, things like that.

Sir Gene:

Oh, that's, that's a great shirt.

Sir Ben:

Yes it is.

Sir Gene:

Mm. So let's see. I I think I told you a while ago. I, I finally got my my Gole

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

and now I'm starting to think it maybe a little too long.

Sir Ben:

isn't this? The pistol.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Why is it too long?

Sir Gene:

I don't know, man. I just, I thought this would be perfectly fine, but now I'm thinking it just looks a little long.

Sir Ben:

Hm.

Sir Gene:

So I'm still kinda looking for the short version.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

So this is a 13 inch,

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

which is actually probably the best performance cuz you get full benefit of the powder in a 12 inch barrel on this gun.

Sir Ben:

and this is chambered in 7, 7 62 by 39.

Sir Gene:

39. Yeah mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

But I kind of want to get the eight inch barrel as well

Sir Ben:

Hm. Well, How much you want for it.

Sir Gene:

for the gun.

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

I probably get two grand for it. It's a never shot.

Sir Ben:

What'd you pay for it?

Sir Gene:

I paid 1800 for it.

Sir Ben:

Ah, so you're gonna profiteer off of it. You bastard

Sir Gene:

I am. What am I come on, man?

Sir Ben:

come on, man. All right. Joe Biden.

Sir Gene:

Come on, come on. Now the six hour AR 15 MCX rattler is pretty nice gun too, but they, they like that. I would have to go to the 300 a seek for

Sir Ben:

Yeah, 300 blackout, which I, I can't

Sir Gene:

which is not a, I don't think it's a bad cartridge. I just

Sir Ben:

It is a subsonic it's if you're going to suit suppressed and in my mind, and people can roast me on this. That is a sub hundred yard gun.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. What it's meant to be. It's a, it's a replacement for an MP five.

Sir Ben:

A crappy one, but, okay.

Sir Gene:

I don't know that. It's I think it's probably better than an MP five dude, better than nine millimeter. Why would you, why would you, I mean, they've done test, dude. This is empirical evidence is that the, the 300 blackout does have better performance at that the a hundred meter range than the nine millimeter

Sir Ben:

but why not go five, seven by 28?

Sir Gene:

Well,

Sir Ben:

90 is a good replace. That is the answer

Sir Gene:

yeah. The P 90 E was also created for the exact same purpose, which is to, to sell against the MP five.

Sir Ben:

Yes. And it's a better, better choice,

Sir Gene:

It's yeah, maybe. Yeah. I mean, it's, it's certainly more compact. I think the gun itself is better, but you know, they didn't sell any of them. There's very few militaries using those or very few police departments.

Sir Ben:

you know, but

Sir Gene:

So your, your price per bullet is about the same,

Sir Ben:

I just can't stand the 300 blackout. I mean, lots of people love it. I, it's just not my favorite. I would prefer six, eight SPC over 300 blackout

Sir Gene:

but six eight is not for that range. That's that's a much longer range.

Sir Ben:

No, but the reason why I like six, eight SPC is you can go all the way down to like a 90 grand bullet. That's traveling very fast, or you can go all the way up to like 180 grand bullet that is traveling subsonic

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm really, you could, I didn't think you could do a subset income. Six, eight,

Sir Ben:

You absolutely can.

Sir Gene:

really? I'll have to read up on that.

Sir Ben:

It suppresses, well, you can do it in a fairly short barrel. Depending on, you know, what you're wanting to do, 16 inch barrel is what it's really optimized for, but you can go as low as an eight inch barrel. You really don't gain anything over 20 inch barrel. There's lots and lots of things. But yeah, you can do subsonic with six, eight and. Ballistically performs better in all categories than 300 blackout, but 300 blackout is more popular. So there's that,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. I mean, that's, that's a good point, cuz there you're really talking about A cartridge that is expensive because not very many people shoot it and I'm sure the subsonics even more expensive.

Sir Ben:

If you can find it. Yeah. Most of the six, eight ammo that you're gonna find commercially available is all right. In that one 15 grain range.

Sir Gene:

Well, and this is one of the reasons I went with the 7 62 by 39. Is that the ammo availability in prices? Just off the roof.

Sir Ben:

yeah. I mean, it's the most common ammo in the world. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Although I, I wanna make sure that I pick up some subsonic. I've only bought regular ammo at this point, but I need to get some subsonic for it as well.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Uh, I do wanna get a, do you know anything about sensors?

Sir Ben:

suppressors. Yes. A little bit.

Sir Gene:

Any brands you like? Cuz I need to pick one up

Sir Ben:

There are a ton of really good brands that are being manufactured around. I would look at what's available first of all, because there is definitely a shortage. The you're, it's still gonna be for the majority of the purchases and NFA item. If you can find a dealer in Texas that manufacturers in Texas and only sells in Texas, you with the new law, you might be able to not do an NFA, but I haven't heard anyone

Sir Gene:

I don't mind doing an

Sir Ben:

do that.

Sir Gene:

I'm totally fine. Doing an FA.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I just don't want the damn tax stamp in going through all that process, but

Sir Gene:

Yep. I know.

Sir Ben:

You know,

Sir Gene:

But I've had friends that have had 'em I've shot plenty of guns with, with suppressors, but I've never bought one previously. And I think that is kind of one of my thoughts in, in sticking one on the the 7 62 by 39.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm so since the, since it's a piston gun you know, you, you could always just do a threat adapter which there are threat adapters that are registered NFA, Atos and do the oil can suppressor route. That's always kind of fun.

Sir Gene:

Do a what?

Sir Ben:

the oil can suppressor

Sir Gene:

Oh yeah.

Sir Ben:

that I may or may not know why that is incredibly effective, but yeah.

Sir Gene:

So I've watched a few videos of tests and everybody says the opposite.

Sir Ben:

I okay. If you're shooting subsonic, ammo, bull crap. And it depends on what oil filter you're using and

Sir Gene:

they're comparing the oil filter to a real suppressor.

Sir Ben:

oh, sure. A real suppressor's gonna be way better. Cool. But it's still very effective

Sir Gene:

Well versus nothing you mean? Okay, sure. Of course, of course. But so's the two liter Coke bottle,

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

especially if there's some water in it.

Sir Ben:

Anyway. Yeah. And then you've got other issues that you're slowing down your projectile and everything else. I, I think there's some really good options out there. The suppressor design that SIG is doing for the new the new rifle Army's rifle is pretty interesting. They're doing some 3d.

Sir Gene:

over barrel one.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. It's 3d printing and it's zero back pressure. So one of the things that I would look for for you it, it depends. What, what, so here's the question is getting gas back in your face. Since that's a, you know, pissed and gun, it's not gonna be

Sir Gene:

Yeah. It's, can't

Sir Ben:

bad. Well, it can cuz you've still got a gas block coming back, angled towards you. Or do you,

Sir Gene:

no it's fully covered with everything. It's still it's well, we'll find out, I guess.

Sir Ben:

Do you have an adjustable gas block on that gun?

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Okay. You do. So it's already set up first.

Sir Gene:

Well, I, it has an option for it. Sure.

Sir Ben:

Okay, because you're gonna have to change the gas settings

Sir Gene:

same thing with the Tavo that, that also has adjustable. I mean, all of 'em are adjustable.

Sir Ben:

cool. Then what I was about to say is really irrelevant. Get whatever the quietest suppressor you can get is

Sir Gene:

Well, that's, that's kind of what I was getting at. Do you know who makes the quietest one?

Sir Ben:

they're all pretty equally quiet. It's just design. If you want back pressure or not back

Sir Gene:

And I don't, I don't mind if it's big either. I, I don't know why people like the long skinny ones. I think that the sort of the big fat ones probably do a better job.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, but it gets in the way of a site picture.

Sir Gene:

Oh, forgot about that. Yeah. So you'd have to put site on the risers or something

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I mean, you don't want something that's in your,

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

I mean, I, I couldn't imagine shooting with iron sites and the suppressors, so I wouldn't worry about that, but definitely the, the scope may need to be higher up.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm so pew, pew, tactical they've got some pretty good reviews most of the time. They have, I'm gonna send you, excuse me. Send you a link to their top six suppressors.

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Sir Ben:

So I haven't been shopping for suppressors, so

Sir Gene:

Sure, sure. I get it

Sir Ben:

you could always go the solvent trap route.

Sir Gene:

new. Definitely not those things don't work.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, they do.

Sir Gene:

I watched videos, dude. They don't work.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. It's look, if your goal is to say, Hey, look, I'm shooting with a suppressor. You could throw anything on. If your goal is to shoot. So you don't have to wear hearing protection then? No, they don't work,

Sir Ben:

okay.

Sir Gene:

but you're a guy who shoots with no hearing suppression without one. So you don't, you're not eligible for any determination of this.

Sir Ben:

So, there was some pretty interesting talk on Tim castle last night, which I don't normally listen, but I was bored and it was Friday night and the kids

Sir Gene:

I, I, I heard about half of it,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So one of the suggestions that they had was and I did not realize this till they brought it up, but the FBI wasn't created by Congress.

Sir Gene:

you know?

Sir Ben:

Were you aware of that?

Sir Gene:

Well it's a government agency. I mean, it wouldn't have to be.

Sir Ben:

It most certainly should have to be created by Congress, but no, it was created actually by an attorney general that formed the investigatory bureau. And it's funded through the attorney general, not as, I, I think at this point they do have some direct budget line items, but it's interesting because it wasn't done by a congressional law. So that means

Sir Gene:

Yeah. But most departments were not created by congressional law.

Sir Ben:

absolutely they were

Sir Gene:

Oh, come on. All right. I'm gonna have to check this while you're talking.

Sir Ben:

So the interesting concept here is that a president could literally sign an executive order and abolish the FBI.

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Sir Ben:

Someone

Sir Gene:

be

Sir Ben:

to do

Sir Gene:

and the Supreme court wouldn't let 'em next.

Sir Ben:

Why,

Sir Gene:

Cuz an institution and Supreme court does not just worry about the constitution. They pretend they protect the institutions of America as well.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, screw them anyway. The the, the joke on Tim Kas last night, which I, I laughed at this and that's why it's good enough to bring up on the show is that Trump should immediately abolish the FBI and then create the the federal bureau of justice.

Sir Gene:

FBJ

Sir Ben:

Yep. F Joe Biden.

Sir Gene:

oh, oh, oh, oh, oh

Sir Ben:

justice bureau. Sorry. Yeah. Les Dixie.

Sir Gene:

fuck Joe Biden. Got it. Got it.

Sir Ben:

that would be hilarious. You know, basically, you know, just reform the FBI in a different fashion and, you know, avoid the whole Supreme court thing. But by just saying, Hey, we're gonna change this. There's been some corruption. We're gonna clean it up. We're gonna create a new agency and, you know yeah.

Sir Gene:

So

Sir Ben:

be, that would just be so good.

Sir Gene:

yeah. Interesting. So the white house press office Created by Congress?

Sir Ben:

No, but that's a function of the presidency. That's not, that's not a entire separate that's that's not a federal police department.

Sir Gene:

Sure. It's not a federal

Sir Ben:

Okay. So what you should look at is, was the ATF created by Congress, was the CIA created by Congress? Was the NSA created by Congress? That's the level of agency I would say

Sir Gene:

Were they?

Sir Ben:

yes. I believe go check me on that, but what

Sir Gene:

I think the ATF was not created by condre.

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

I don't think the ATF was, me look at the history of the ATF.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, BLM would be another one.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. BLM was definitely not created. That was a couple of lesbian chicks in California,

Sir Ben:

oh my God, no gene, no gene. You're thinking of something totally different.

Sir Gene:

Yes, the bureau land management. That was part of Indian affairs division, I believe.

Sir Ben:

Yes. And was created by Congress.

Sir Gene:

Yeah,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Yeah, yeah. And the ATF was also created by Congress. I do believe I could be wrong. It's happened before

Sir Gene:

sure. Nope. War revenue act.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Um,

Sir Ben:

in fact, I think the ATF creation stemmed out of the a

Sir Gene:

yeah, it might have, let's see. See, I'm looking at their history and they have a lot of history that has nothing to do with them cuz they, they go back to the 17 hundreds.

Sir Ben:

this is, you know, our origin story.

Sir Gene:

so yeah, May, 1930 prohibition reorganization act of May 27th, 1930 was sort of the Genesis of the,

Sir Ben:

so it was from a act of Congress.

Sir Gene:

so, and in 19 May 27th, 1930, it transferred the bureau of prohibition from the us department of treasury to the us department of justice. So department of justice, what the hell created that?

Sir Ben:

The department of justice is the justice department has been around for a long time, but it's always been under the attorney general, essentially. So it, you know, but anyway, what it comes down to is the history of the FBI and how this got formed. I, I was ignorant too. I didn't realize that a attorney general had just created this out of thin air. And what, what just shocks me is how did this ever survive the first few years, without someone going, Hey, that's not constitutional. You have no policing powers anywhere in the constitution

Sir Gene:

Because that, the only way that would happen is if somebody sued and went all the way up to the Supreme court,

Sir Ben:

and why didn't that happen?

Sir Gene:

because you have to have a case that you're willing to take up to the Supreme.

Sir Ben:

Okay. I'm a gangster when the FBI, the FBI is coming after me and I'm a gangster and they come after me and they find me, you know, guilty of whatever. Why can I not Sue and say, Hey, you had no right to do this.

Sir Gene:

you can Sue, but you can't use, it'll get in gains to Sue

Sir Ben:

It's not ill gotten gains. It's you know, I'm

Sir Gene:

pay and pay the lawyer for, with your gangster. You're gonna pay the lawyer with what,

Sir Ben:

okay. Fair

Sir Gene:

Bringing a case up to Supreme court is about at least a half million

Sir Ben:

Oh, well, it's gotta be more than that.

Sir Gene:

It it's a bare minimum. That's why I'm quoting a number. I heard a lawyer talk about. But yeah, realistically could be much more than that. And it's usually three to four years.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

So when a law gets passed, that's clearly

Sir Ben:

wasn't a law. This wasn't, this wasn't even a presidential

Sir Gene:

I know, but just hear me out when the law gets passed is gonna constitutional. It's gonna be at least three or four years before the first challenge, which may not go through, which may be not heard, not elected to be heard by the Supreme court. So yeah, that's not a law, that's fine. But there's all kinds of things that are done through administrative actions. Like the definition of a gun, for example,

Sir Ben:

Yep,

Sir Gene:

it changes. And now it, it means literally pieces of plastic parts

Sir Ben:

yep.

Sir Gene:

are now fully functional, automatic weapons by the. And this is not the only agency. I mean, in general in the us agencies have way more latitude than presidents. They're the ones that are around eternally presidents come and go.

Sir Ben:

Why this whole system is so screwed

Sir Gene:

it's the same system that we've had for the last 2000 years. People in power rule and by being in power, they stay in power.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But a mid-level bureaucrat has never been this powerful.

Sir Gene:

Oh, really? Tell that to the me. Mechi

Sir Ben:

I had the, what?

Sir Gene:

the, the Meese mechi

Sir Ben:

still not following you. Sorry.

Sir Gene:

the they were the, the Venetian oligarchs.

Sir Ben:

Okay. I, I, I don't know much about Venetian history. Sorry that isn't one of those that, isn't one of those that I've really focused on very much. So

Sir Gene:

Well, I mean, it's, it's all part of, sort of the enlightenment age. But there there's a, a lot of power that comes from activities that aren't necessarily. Government based themselves. And then once people get in power, then they get into government or they end up buying government. So there there's a I guess my point is once you have power, you're less willing to give it up regardless of how you got there.

Sir Ben:

Well, yeah,

Sir Gene:

And so,

Sir Ben:

corrupts.

Sir Gene:

yeah. And so when you build a new organization, space force is another example. It will never shrink. It will only grow. It will consume more money and more of the economy, and it will insulate the people that work for it from any kind ups and downs. It will create a separate class of citizens. And that's exactly what's been happening. This is not a problem. Unique to the United States. It's happens to every single country out there.

Sir Ben:

but there has to be some readjustment at some point, you know,

Sir Gene:

It's called a revolution.

Sir Ben:

well, and I think we're, so for instance, I, I, the whole FBI thing looking at the, the, the jump, the shark moment just keeps getting worse for the justice department. The more that comes out about the Mar AR Lago raid. So the, the, the portion of the FBI that did the raid Mar Lago is the same group that did crossfire hurricane. How insane is that? And it looks more and more like the reason why they went in there is because Trump declassified, the crossfire hurricane stuff, and he had an unredacted copy of it, and it was damning and they didn't want him to have that. So they went in there and stole it. The, the amount of corruption that we're seeing in these government agencies, I mean, the behavior that is just blatant and out in the open, at some point, there is going to be a group of people that say, you know what, this isn't okay anymore.

Sir Gene:

Maybe

Sir Ben:

so he, he, he I'll just say this,

Sir Gene:

it's not gonna change by people voting. I can guarantee you that.

Sir Ben:

Well, I did. Here's what I'll say. I think if there is a red wave or a red tsunami during the midterms, I think if the presidential election goes the way of DeSantis Trump, then I think we avoid an all out civil war. I think if the elections are manipulated enough to where neither one of those things happen, I don't know. I, I think there are a lot of people who aren't gonna just allow this aggressive liberal March to the sea.

Sir Gene:

I think that this, this raid gives Trump a great out, gives him an awesome exit.

Sir Ben:

How's that?

Sir Gene:

It, it lets him. Not run

Sir Ben:

Why would he not run? I think this is the impetus for him to

Sir Gene:

no, not at all. Nobody wants him running, well, you want him running? I don't want him running, but here's the thing. If he doesn't run, if he says, you know what, I'm an old guy at this point, I may be the best old guy, total winner, but I've already been president. And I think it's time to bring in some young blood come here, young blood DeSantis. If he does that, his core supporters, probably like you would take that, oh my God, the Democrats actually managed to get him down to run those bastards. We need to do everything we can to fight them. He can shift the blame for a decision to not run on the Democrats while at the same time remaining a king maker.

Sir Ben:

yeah, I, by the way, I'm not a core Trump supporter. I think he has done a lot of really good things and he has shocked me as a as he's the only Republican president I've ever voted for. I'll put it that way.

Sir Gene:

Jesus.

Sir Ben:

What,

Sir Gene:

No, that's just shocking.

Sir Ben:

why

Sir Gene:

Well, I never took you for a non, non Republican voting guy.

Sir Ben:

I'm a libertarian?

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I know. But the libertarian party's just been presenting shit candidates for a long.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, well, but so is the Republican party.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, fair enough.

Sir Ben:

I, who was I gonna vote for? Romney Bush really?

Sir Gene:

not.

Sir Ben:

McCain. You think I would ever fucking vote for John McCain?

Sir Gene:

Okay. Well, fair enough. I haven't voted for those guys either, but I did vote for Ross Perro.

Sir Ben:

I, that I was not eligible to vote at that time.

Sir Gene:

No, yeah.

Sir Ben:

So when you look at the presidential candidates that the Republican party presented me since I've been legally allowed to vote. Yeah. No, thank you.

Sir Gene:

I did vote for Bush once

Sir Ben:

why Like the crime families? I mean,

Sir Gene:

I mean, well, compared to the alternative,

Sir Ben:

well, I mean, just compared to Al gore, you know,

Sir Gene:

well, yeah, I would definitely not vote for Al gore.

Sir Ben:

but I, I would probably vote, I don't know who the libertarian candidate was for the first one. That was, I was not eligible

Sir Gene:

It was a yeah, I don't remember either, but I, I remember I, after after getting off Clinton, I definitely wanted nothing to do with anybody on that side, Dale, so, yeah. And then he, and it proved to be a you know, it a, a as much of a crime family guy, as you mentioned. So I definitely didn't vote for him the second time, but I'm trying to think. Was there anybody El cause I didn't vote for his dad cuz he was a trader.

Sir Ben:

Oh yeah. This is da Papa Bush. When, when, when the wizard died, I was not sad. And you know, here in college station, you know, this is Bush family library, all at Bush presidential library, all that. And by the way, Hey, Hey, another dynasty died, lose Cheney, losing. Oh my

Sir Gene:

Yeah, that was

Sir Ben:

By, by a fucking landslide. Now she's talking about running for president. How fucking laughable is

Sir Gene:

that's what you do when you're losing the local election is you run in the national election. Mm-hmm yeah.

Sir Ben:

my God.

Sir Gene:

And all the Democrats that were crying about her losing, because this was the first time they ever voted Republican. I thought that was hilarious. People actually switching parties to vote for somebody. And then that person loses

Sir Ben:

yep.

Sir Gene:

pretty funny.

Sir Ben:

Well, and the fact that they called that race at like 4% reporting was just hilarious.

Sir Gene:

Oh, I didn't know

Sir Ben:

oh, yes. That they called it so early. Cuz it was so overwhelming. Oh. Like I was, I was, I was watching the poll results, you know? Cause I was interested like, okay, how's this gonna go? And oh my God, like I thought, I thought they would, I thought she would lose, but I didn't ever estimate that it would be by that big of a margin.

Sir Gene:

Oh. I figured people don't like her. She's not lik.

Sir Ben:

No. And her dad is not likable either and you know? Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, but I understand her dad more. I mean, I think she was just a clinger on,

Sir Ben:

What do you what do you, what do you like about her dad?

Sir Gene:

I didn't say like, I mean, I understand, I mean, the guy, he had a, a specific path in life.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Abusive alcoholic.

Sir Gene:

Well, down aside you know, I mean, he's also a robot.

Sir Ben:

He is very least cyborg

Sir Gene:

Yeah. He definitely side

Sir Ben:

I mean, how he is still alive, given his heart conditions and everything else is just

Sir Gene:

I think they replaced over half his organs.

Sir Ben:

I, I don't know.

Sir Gene:

It just goes to show you that really what it comes down to is if you have the willpower, you can maintain life.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Will power and money.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Well, yes, but fair enough. You probably need a little more than just willpower.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Also CNN, I don't know if you've noticed this, but they canceled reliable sources.

Sir Gene:

Which is what, I don't know what that is.

Sir Ben:

You don't know about reliable sources, so,

Sir Gene:

don't have a TV.

Sir Ben:

yes you do.

Sir Gene:

No, I only have computer monitors,

Sir Ben:

Okay. And you can watch TV on a computer

Sir Gene:

but I, I would never watch CNN.

Sir Ben:

No, but you could pay attention to the news of them canceling stuff.

Sir Gene:

I I've been out of it this week, dude. What's going on?

Sir Ben:

Okay. Well, anyway, Brian seltzer

Sir Gene:

Seltzer, water

Sir Ben:

Fired, canceled. Yep. No longer with CNN.

Sir Gene:

or was he laid off?

Sir Ben:

They let him go and canceled his.

Sir Gene:

So they must have laid him off then. So you can still get unemployment,

Sir Ben:

I would say he's probably fired, but yeah, I mean, okay. Unemployment, if someone like that ever files for unemployment, they should be slapped.

Sir Gene:

what you think he shouldn't be allowed to just cuz he is white.

Sir Ben:

exactly. No, to me, first of all, I, I, I, I have whore that unemployment exists at all. That that to me is not a function of the government

Sir Gene:

it's not, it's an insurance paid by companies.

Sir Ben:

administered by the government.

Sir Gene:

Sure. Administered by the government, but it's, you're like you're literally paying for that unemployment insurance

Sir Ben:

And if I, and if I choose to take part of my paycheck and pay for unemployment insurance, that should be my choice.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

And if I choose to not pay for it, that should be my choice, but that's not the case.

Sir Gene:

I agree.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So for instance, at this point in my life, establish as I am in my career with the options that I have with the money in the bank, I would never, if I had the choice of not paying for unemployment insurance, I would never pay for it. I would invest that money elsewhere.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, no, that's a fair thing. And I like when you know, COVID interrupted my business and everybody else is getting unemployment because of COVID I couldn't get it

Sir Ben:

Why?

Sir Gene:

because I don't pay unemployment insurance.

Sir Ben:

No, cuz you do Corp to Corp.

Sir Gene:

I, I could. Yeah, well, I, cuz I, yeah.

Sir Ben:

Yeah,

Sir Gene:

so I don't, I don't pay myself a salary.

Sir Ben:

right.

Sir Gene:

So consequently but which is fine. I mean, again, I'm not complaining, I'm just saying that it's

Sir Ben:

should have filed for the small business relief.

Sir Gene:

yeah. There's a lot of people. I actually know people have made tons of money

Sir Ben:

I, I do too. It it's, it's insane. The amount of bull crap. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I did not file or get a dime during COVID. I, I actually haven't gotten a dime from the government ever in my life. So

Sir Ben:

I have never been unemployed long enough to ever even file for unemployment insurance.

Sir Gene:

I, well, I filed for it once and it was denied because my employer was being a Dick.

Sir Ben:

Hmm. So I, the only time I have ever even looked into it this was Jesus to this was a long, long time ago. I, I had a managed service provider that me and a business partner had started. He was technically the owner of the company. I Had some stake in it, but I was listed as an employee. He had over 51% and he decided to go a different way and that it would be cheaper and better to do it without me. And anyway hired someone and literally tried changing passwords at midnight one night. And I'm sitting there watching him and I'm like, yeah, no, anyway, ended up blocking him out. Which was hilarious because yeah. Anyway, so there was a whole fight over that. And anyway, I ended up just saying, you know what, man, you, you go do you here you buy me out. This is the right. And we go do whatever. And anyway, he tried to go take the clients that we had and everything else and run with it. And I just went to the client that had been the main client I had brought in that had been mine for over seven and a half years. And you know, said, look, I'm gonna be starting this up on my own. We're splitting I'd love for y'all to be my first client. And the owner of the company at the time said, you know what why don't we just bring you on board instead of paying you that way? We want you full time. So I ended up managing their entire it department and really building it up and yeah.

Sir Gene:

cool.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I L literally less than a week so, but yeah, man, it it's one of those things. If you're gonna divide and you decide you wanna go a separate way, do it a amicably, do it as an adult. Don't try and pull that crap,

Sir Gene:

I, I think I

Sir Ben:

especially when you're not the technical person in the relationship. you

Sir Gene:

yeah, exactly. I think I mentioned

Sir Ben:

the way, this is where good network and Sims come in, because when you see account changes and things happening, you know, if you're monitoring and actually paying attention,

Sir Gene:

I should see that happening. So if they were smart, they would've shut that off first. Yeah, so I had in my twenties, my, my first real company that I'd started with another guy where we were a Microsoft solution provider and just really focusing on, you know, techy shit. This is doing my techy phase is probably. Two or three months after we started the business, I was doing, I had some ongoing contract work that I was doing, bringing money into the business. Then he was he's also a tech guy, but he was he didn't have any existing contract. He was trying to do some sales and meeting with a few companies. And then there's a a development shop that we like ran into once or met with them. And then they said, oh, we should talk about maybe doing some synergizing or something. And passing leads back and forth. And I was like, cool. So I was busy. I had a client meeting to go to, so my partner goes off to meet with this development firm. And then later that afternoon, I remember to this day I was drying around the lake in the Annapolis. And it was a nice, nice sunny day and called up my business partner. I'm like, Hey, so how'd the meeting go? I says, oh, it went pretty good. He said, oh, well good. So did you get did you kind of figure out what we can do for each other? He says, well, they gave me a job offer and I was like, really? And I says, yeah. And I took it. I was like, what.

Sir Ben:

Gee. Thanks buddy.

Sir Gene:

would what do you mean to, yeah, well, you just kind of talk through and, you know, they wanna move in this direction and they want me to manage their their it side for the company. I mean, at that point I was kind of speechless for the first time ever,

Sir Ben:

Right.

Sir Gene:

because like, well, I, I mean, on the one hand, you're a buddy, so I should say congratulations. On the other hand, you just fucked me royally.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Cuz we're we just started the business and now you're leaving immediately after starting the business. So

Sir Ben:

if they were gonna act like that and do that to you, you're probably better off

Sir Gene:

I know, I know, I know, but it was it like, this was a guy that I used to work with and we probably, we were also good friends. We hung out all the time. We, yeah, I mean we probably saw each other like five days a week, so it was very unexpected to me that he would do this. And I guess what the lesson learned from there was is that I have a fairly high tolerance for the unpredictable and the chaos. And I think that he. As I was talking about starting my own business, I think he got kind of swept up in the excitement and thought, yeah, that's a great idea. But I think after two or three months of realizing that it's actually hard work to get clients, I think reality built him and given the opportunity to do bail,

Sir Ben:

and have something that he perceived as stable.

Sir Gene:

but it would literally be doing the exact same thing that he was doing in our company, except that he's trading ownership for a paycheck

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

and you know, more people immediately that will be supporting him so I can see how he arrived at that conclusion. The sad part of he didn't say, well, that sounds fascinating. I need to think about it.

Sir Ben:

right. And I need

Sir Gene:

And then talk to me

Sir Ben:

Yep.

Sir Gene:

yeah, that would've been more of what I would've expected, but instead I, I guess the offer was so good and he was not willing to walk away from it without saying yes. That he went as far as to literally say yes. So, so I bought him out for peanuts, but it still wasn't good. Cuz more than the value of, of his ownership, it was, you know, him doing the work that was interesting and unique. And then I, you know,

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

was very disappointed in that. Plus I got hit with lawsuit, which suck.

Sir Ben:

What did you get sued

Sir Gene:

not, not from him. Oh, it was non-compete So I couldn't work with any previous clients while we're going and dealing with a lawsuit.

Sir Ben:

yeah, so non-compete is interesting because it's, it's enforceability varies so much depending on, you know, was there actual consideration given for it and things like that and then the state law. So, you know, basically what I'd say is in, for instance, in the state of Texas, just some advice, if anyone's ever going up against the non-compete, if, unless they paid you a specific bonus for the non-compete and saying that this was consideration for that non-compete,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

then it basically means nothing in the state of Texas.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Which literally is what I describe in my book about writing good non-compete agreements,

Sir Ben:

and that, that, that bonus can be a dollar. It doesn't really matter, but as long as there's something tied saying, you are agreeing to this, and here's the consideration, we are paying you for

Sir Gene:

it's not the initial job offer. So, and I, I didn't, you know, like I got sued, right. So unfortunately I didn't get a lawyer until after the first court hearing, at which point they already put in a tier or none of Tero they put in a. Cease and desist thing what the hell they call it? When the, when basically they say you have to stop doing this until the matters resolved. So, is it, I thought it was something else now cease and desist. I didn't think it was coming from the courts, but either way. So I couldn't, I couldn't work with any clients while this is going on. And then

Sir Ben:

previous ones, but you could go prospect new ones.

Sir Gene:

yes, yes, absolutely. But my, my 80% of my work was coming from a client that I'd been working with forever

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

through that firm. So plus I had to find a new guy to work with the client.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Uh, and then my, my contention on the case was that I wasn't doing the same job. Yes. It was the same client, but it was doing a different job. So I wasn't simply just doing the

Sir Ben:

you weren't taking the client away from them. You're going into a different role for

Sir Gene:

Well, I kind of was because my job, I went from doing it, work to teaching how to do it work.

Sir Ben:

Hmm.

Sir Gene:

So I was training an internal person to do it.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

Right. It's, it's similar but different. And and I had a good, good law firm did a two days of deposition, which is. Where they tried to catch me and say something that, you know, would show that I'm and their, their, their thing is like, well, you didn't know how to do this stuff before you came here. And my point was, I've been doing this for literally six years before I joined you guys. So yeah, I knew exactly like I had the skills and you know, I could have definitely not joined you and still been doing the same thing. But it was interesting. Also at that point in time realized just how much my natural instinct is better than a $300 an hour lawyers. So I had to kick him under the desk every time I wanted him to object to something.

Sir Ben:

Lawyers are so hit or miss man.

Sir Gene:

well, even the good one that like, you gotta realize that it's just a job and for you, if you're the one getting sued, this is your life.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

And so the lawyers, the expectation needs to be just tempered in that regard. And then the, yeah, after that you know, they had the, the dates for the hearing and they're like, everybody wants to settle. It's like, well, they'll take legal fees and $10,000 and then get it all wrapped up. I'm like, are you kidding? No, we're gonna go to trial. Like, no, I really don't advise you to go to trial cuz you know, there's. Could be a lot more. I'm like, no, we're not settling. Tell, tell them, there's no way I'm settling. This is gonna go to trial. And like their lawyer didn't want it. My lawyer didn't wanna go to trial. Nobody wants to ever go to trial because it's unpredictable. They don't know what's gonna end up happening, but I wanted to go to trial. And in the end they gave up, they dropped the case because they didn't wanna go to trial because they knew the expense of going to trial would never be recovered because they didn't have a case. They were willing to pay a lawyer to file the paperwork

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And to

Sir Gene:

purely to try and settle. Yeah. Yep. Exactly.

Sir Ben:

there, you know, lots of lawsuits end up that way.

Sir Gene:

I think do.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Well, and I'll, I'll just take my own case. I've got some issues with the house that we've found and we keep having repeated challenges

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

based off of. Issues from the builder and trying to get them to resolve the issues. And you know, it's no one thing is at all worth a lawsuit to me, but when I start adding it up and I start looking at, okay, I'm gonna have to add an AC unit upstairs because the AC unit can't keep up upstairs. So for instance, by this afternoon, we'll be close to a hundred. It'll be, you know, it'll be several degrees off the set point. So you know, this is a brand new house and they should have put a bigger unit in is what it comes down to. So have to add another AC instead of having the zoned AC and then the cabinet paint is not holding up. It's it's, they, they screwed up the, when they, when the cabinets were made, they used a water based paint that they apparently had a fuck up with, excuse my

Sir Gene:

use latex.

Sir Ben:

I'm sorry.

Sir Gene:

They use the latex paint.

Sir Ben:

No water based

Sir Gene:

Yeah. That is water based.

Sir Ben:

anyway, I don't know what the, the exact finish is on these cabinets, but it's peeling. It's not holding up. So the cabinets need to be refinished. And again, this is a brand new

Sir Gene:

Should do. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

And anyway, and there's just lots of little things there. There was issues with the garage door openers, and anyway, it all adds up to probably around 25, 30 grand worth of stuff to be done and fixed. And, you know, I'm, I'm trying to work with the builder to say, Hey, we, we need to resolve this. And they've sent their AC guys out here three times to do their tests and all this. And basically he's, I know he is gonna come back and say, well, that's just what it is. And at that point I'm probably gonna get a lawyer. And I'm probably gonna say, you know, so you are admitting to me that this AC unit is not gonna keep up in normal Texas weather. Okay, well, you fucked up then. Right? And my goal is going to be to get them to settle and just do the work and take care of it. You know? So anyway, I don't know Hate to do that, but at the same time, you, you buy a brand new house. You expect things to be at least sized adequately.

Sir Gene:

well, but okay. I will say just play devil's advocate that sometimes size appropriately for legal contents is different than ideal context. So

Sir Ben:

be able to maintain 75 in the upstairs office when it's a hundred degrees.

Sir Gene:

So mine struggles at that.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, this one cannot, it, it will be 78, 77 in here. And if it's 110, it's over 80 and that's just not acceptable.

Sir Gene:

Well, you're literally describing my house.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well that, okay. That downstairs stays fine. Downstairs zone stays

Sir Gene:

here. Same here. Yeah. I think the issue is you need multiple air conditioners

Sir Ben:

Agreed.

Sir Gene:

and clearly when this house was built, it was sized appropriately that they deemed a single air conditioner was.

Sir Ben:

Well, they were

Sir Gene:

I'm talking about my house.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, but my house was built, you know, here in 29 2019 finished in 2020,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

this is not a 1990s house.

Sir Gene:

well, neither is mine, dude. My house 12 years old.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

I mean, it's like, I'm just saying that they take the square footage, they buy an AC that is labeled for that square footage and they plop it in and no one gives a shit that it's 110 degrees in

Sir Ben:

yeah. So actually the the, the unit that they have is actually undersized for the square footage of

Sir Gene:

Well, then you got a

Sir Ben:

And their argument is, well, we build such a tight house that, you know, well, obviously not.

Sir Gene:

Obviously not mine is sized appropriately, but it's still struggles.

Sir Ben:

mine is undersized for the square footage. If you go BA purely based off a

Sir Gene:

And you got a big house, right.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

And that's so it's surprising that you only have a single air conditioner

Sir Ben:

they, they went with the zoning and they undersized it. Yeah, it really should be two smaller units than the one big unit. It really should be. It'd be far better.

Sir Gene:

yeah. Well, if you're gonna stick around that house for a while and just pick up a second AC

Sir Ben:

yeah, but it, I don't think, I don't feel like it should be at my cost is the entire thing here,

Sir Gene:

did you get a good deal on the house?

Sir Ben:

Compared to current market value. Sure.

Sir Gene:

Okay, well, I don't feel sorry for you then.

Sir Ben:

well, anyway, yeah. It's, it's just, you

Sir Gene:

yeah. Yeah. First

Sir Ben:

of the upper middle class,

Sir Gene:

Yes, exactly. First world problems.

Sir Ben:

indeed.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, it, so this is, I only built one house in my life and I know that the builder absolutely was sick of me by the time it was done, because I was one of those guys that went to the construction site every single week and did a walkthrough of the house and provided my notes

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm yeah, it, I would never have a client like you, I would've fired you as a client immediately.

Sir Gene:

that I don't think you could afford to do that when you have contracts in place. But

Sir Ben:

it depends.

Sir Gene:

they definitely told me that they would like to have a consolidated single, you know, set of changes and feedback coming from me, not a weekly dribble of stuff coming in. And I said, I don't see that contractually being the case.

Sir Ben:

I would've charged you for every change order possible.

Sir Gene:

well, the problem was, I mean, you, you would think that if I was just making changes, but I wasn't, what I was doing is pointing out things that were out of contract spec

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

because, and they can't do anything about that. you know, it's just, most people wouldn't notice. I was like, hold up. And, you know, I remember when we went through this, we talked about putting in this many leads for water and not using a single tap with, or single line with five taps off of it. And I, I just walked through the house and I only see two and it should be four. So what gives, well now they gotta get the plumber out there and then fix it. So it's all shit like that. You know, I had every room wired with ethernet and with coax this was pre fiber days, so I didn't do fiber. I would've probably done that at this point.

Sir Ben:

Ever pull fiber in the house,

Sir Gene:

because I want to be able to have options

Sir Ben:

but why would you ever pull fiber in a house? And I don't understand the options.

Sir Gene:

well, I may want to have you know, servers separate from a ice feed computer somewhere.

Sir Ben:

Okay, but you can do 10 gig on cat six. So, I mean, what server are you putting in?

Sir Gene:

well, we had cat five E at the time, but I don't know. I wanna

Sir Ben:

But still, what are you gonna saturate a gig a bit

Sir Gene:

Oh, for fuck's sake, who cares? Doesn't matter if it's much easier to pull everything when there are no drywall

Sir Ben:

yeah, 100%. 100%.

Sir Gene:

try and pull it after drywall's been

Sir Ben:

So would you go single molder or multi mode?

Sir Gene:

For the fiber I'd put full I'd pull four strands through every room.

Sir Ben:

Right. But single mold or multi mode.

Sir Gene:

I don't know.

Sir Ben:

It should definitely be multi mode if you're not going over a mile. So there's that. And then then what termination are you gonna use? Are you gonna use MTR?

Sir Gene:

know what I would use, I'd tell you the termination I would use is an expert to come and fucking do shit that I'm not doing myself. That's the termination mode I would use. Oh my God. Who gives a shit? You know, the last time that I had to crawl through a, a crawl space to pull cable, I was in my early twenties. Okay, dude. So, my, my point is simply that if you're building something from scratch, that that gives you a tremendous opportunity for not just customization, but future proofing. And so you can make the decisions later. So, you know, if I want ethernet, I want four plugs per room, one on each wall so that there's no long ass cables dangling around. If I decide to put a desk on a different side,

Sir Ben:

Yep. And all terminated in a central closet with decent enough ventilation and everything else. Yep.

Sir Gene:

Yep. I had a rack in there. I had a rack in the house as most techy guys would.

Sir Ben:

I've got a rack in the room I'm in

Sir Gene:

There you go. yes. And, and then there's no female connected to it, but I'm pump. So, like all these things, I think are a pain in the butt for the builder, but man, do they make your house better to live in and better to resell?

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And one thing people should always realize is in, you should always pull at, so if you want a cable per wall, like Jean's talking about, you should pull two to each location. And the reason why is because the contractor's gonna have some crappy people pulling cable, it's not gonna be in cable tray in a house. And it's, you're going to end up with broken cables. So you don't wanna have to repo

Sir Gene:

yeah. And even basic stuff for people that aren't all nerdy and need like fiber in the house you know, the, there are minimum legal requirements on outlets and it's one, I think every nine feet or something and one every 12 feet, whatever it is.

Sir Ben:

Oh, it's not a legal requirement. It's a building code.

Sir Gene:

building codes require, well, that is a legal requirement.

Sir Ben:

Well, and okay. Depends on the county you're

Sir Gene:

you get fined if you don't do it. Right. Right. So the point is, it doesn't mean that's all they can do. So if you're building a house, double it up, but cut that size in half, or just tell 'em. I want two outlets in that wall instead of one, because from a practical standpoint, they're already running the cable. So having a junction off that cable to another location, that's six feet away is not that much work,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But there,

Sir Gene:

a lot of.

Sir Ben:

but there is, you know, you gotta load balance on the breakers and everything else. You gotta take all that into consideration.

Sir Gene:

I don't know about your house. Every room in my house is just a single breaker.

Sir Ben:

Right. But depending on the size of the room and how many outlets you're talking about that could end up being more than one,

Sir Gene:

Well then you, it again, much easier to do that when they're building the house than replacing this shit later.

Sir Ben:

a hundred percent agree.

Sir Gene:

So that's my only point is that if you go to the trouble of actually building take full advantage of it, don't just trust somebody that quote unquote knows what they're doing to build you a nice house, because remember, first of all, a builder's gonna try and do everything as cheap as possible and give you less air conditioning than you need. That's where this conversation started. But beyond that, if you're going to the trouble of building a house, make sure that you don't stick to just the minimum bare bones requirements.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, well, you know, we're, we're nerdy on this, but you know, for instance, when we moved into this house, I pulled I've got ceiling mounted, access points throughout the house. And you know, I pulled cable and to the closet and everything else. And, you know, I've got nice managed network here and I've got four access points throughout the house and, you know,

Sir Gene:

but wouldn't it have been cool. If when the house was built, they prewired all that stuff.

Sir Ben:

oh, sure. Just saved me some sweat and tears, but you know, it's all good. I, I can, I can pull cable in my own house if I need to.

Sir Gene:

Right. But my point is that it's better to not need to because to there.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Yeah. Agreed.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And then, and then by having the coax there, I could actually have like, my video game console at the time be plugged into a different TV than the one that was right next to it. So there there's definitely, I mean, I don't know how much you need coax these days, but back in the

Sir Ben:

I, I only need one drop and that's where my cable modem sits for my internet connect.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. So that, that makes sense.

Sir Ben:

Literally everything else is wireless at this point with a couple of exceptions. So

Sir Gene:

yeah, I don't like wireless

Sir Ben:

I, I don't either, but is a practical standpoint,

Sir Gene:

if I lived on the 40 acre you know, ranch or ranchette would be probably a more correct term. Then wifi would be great, but living in the city, like I do, where I can see about 30 other access points from my house.

Sir Ben:

well, you need a better access point.

Sir Gene:

Well, I have a good access point, but I actually, I actually, I have multiple access points and they run on every band, from six to five

Sir Ben:

But what are you, what, what, what, what style access point are you using?

Sir Gene:

What do you mean.

Sir Ben:

What access point are you using?

Sir Gene:

It's a here I'll log into it. I think it's a NAIS.

Sir Ben:

Well, yeah, there's, there's part of your problem. So

Sir Gene:

I have no problem here, dude. I know why you're creating a problem.

Sir Ben:

for instance looking at my network traffic around here the direct Roku someone is putting out on 2.4 gigahertz is the biggest. Competitor I have, but 2.4 gigahertz is where there's any overlap. And I have all my access points doing channel hopping, but both my, all my access points also do five gigahertz. And

Sir Gene:

you have low access neighbors. I

Sir Ben:

literally there's only one other access point that I'm seeing on this, that on five. So, you know, I have no problem.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Well, again, that's where you live. Your neighbors. Aren't particularly tech savvy, cuz I have 11 on five gigahertz. And so I, I have I'm running right now. Two, two gigahertz, two, five gigahertz and one six gigahertz

Sir Ben:

Are these all separately managed?

Sir Gene:

yet, yeah, totally.

Sir Ben:

Go get you some unify access points and run the unify manager and have it do advanced channel hopping have 'em all have the same SS I D and you'll, you'll be

Sir Gene:

that works like shit. It's way worse to do that. No, I've done. It's much better to manually be able to flip, flip from whichever one you want to, if you trust the system to do it, you'll inevitably end up having slowdowns,

Sir Ben:

I mean, what throughput do you need?

Sir Gene:

As fast as possible.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

And so what I do is I look at the spectrum and I figure out which part of the spectrum is the least used. And that's where I have my my high speed channel set to, and I do that at least once a month. And then everything else literally fills in the rest of it. I have every piece of the available spectrum filled in with my access points. And you know, those are effectively backups for the, the one that's the least utilized.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm, so running on this laptop, which is not the most up to date. I think I've got an AC card in here, but I'd have to look over wireless you know, and I rate limit in each individual user. So for instance, my firewall, I will only allow an individual device max out at 200 megabits per second, because I've got a, you know, bunch of people here and over wireless, you know, no problem here in the office, just running the Google speed test. I was hitting 1 73.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I'm hitting three 80 and that's not good enough

Sir Ben:

Why?

Sir Gene:

because I want the speed that I'm paying for.

Sir Ben:

But so the, okay. I, I have a gigabit internet connection here.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

If I go on my firewall and I open everything up and I plug directly in, I can usually get around 900 and something.

Sir Gene:

yeah, that's what I get from my hardwired computers.

Sir Ben:

Right. I'm never going to use that on an individual computer.

Sir Gene:

Oh my God. I use that every day.

Sir Ben:

Why, what files are you

Sir Gene:

I download things.

Sir Ben:

what are you downloading? That is, I mean,

Sir Gene:

Okay. Two things. First of all, I have large size downloads that I do on a regular basis.

Sir Ben:

why are you downloading your foreign gene?

Sir Gene:

it's the believe me, you don't need to download porn. There's

Sir Ben:

you can stream

Sir Gene:

of it out there. You can stream. It does not require high

Sir Ben:

okay. So what are you downloading? That's

Sir Gene:

Game updates, game updates. On an average day, there are three to five different games that have been updated. And the, the typical download is, is gonna be between one and 20 gigabit.

Sir Ben:

Okay. So at couple hundred megabits for a

Sir Gene:

Now the other thing. Yeah. And I don't like waiting, so I want that to be done instantly. The other thing is I want not just high speed, but I want really good ping times.

Sir Ben:

well, yeah, I mean, your ping time should be very low, but wireless isn't gonna have, so this is gonna geek out and we

Sir Gene:

Oh, we're Don. We lost half the audience at this point. This conversation

Sir Ben:

So the, the worst part, the worst part of wireless is that you have collision avoidance, not collision detection. Right? So, yeah. Anyway for what I'm doing,

Sir Gene:

of the things, yeah, you're just looking up websites and typing things that requires no bandwidth.

Sir Ben:

I download quite a bit of content. Thank you. And do lots of things and you

Sir Gene:

Disney movies.

Sir Ben:

no, no, no, no, no, no. You know, 30, 40 gig ISOs to test the latest XYZ iteration of my company's platform, things like that.

Sir Gene:

okay. Sure. So, point being, get this shit put into your house when you're building it. Don't wait until later and don't just rely on wireless. The other thing about wireless is I also have a wireless jammer, so. If I would like to fuck with my neighbors, I can do that pretty easily.

Sir Ben:

you know, that's illegal.

Sir Gene:

Not this kind, this kind's totally legal,

Sir Ben:

How so?

Sir Gene:

grandfathered in.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

It was a registered device that just happens to have a lot of power

Sir Ben:

Mm. Well,

Sir Gene:

that, and I'm also a ham.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

So I have special, right?

Sir Ben:

What, what's your what's your call signed?

Sir Gene:

KF, no KF, five TB. That's actually a Dallas number cuz that's where I got it.

Sir Ben:

it's not kilo whiskey, tango Foxtrot

Sir Gene:

No, why?

Sir Ben:

whiskey, tango Foxtrot.

Sir Gene:

It's definitely not what the fuck. No,

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

No. And I, I thought about you know, getting one of the custom signs,

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

I just never been into it is enough to do that.

Sir Ben:

I, you know, I've, I've thought about getting my ham license a couple of times,

Sir Gene:

may need to renew soon because it's probably gonna expire this year or next year.

Sir Ben:

just never been a radio guy where I, you know, the tech I've always been interested in has been, you know, on the computer.

Sir Gene:

I I'll tell you the main reason I got it is because back in the early days, back in the olden days, It was the, like, you had to have a ham license to receive video from a drone.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Like that was, that was the only way you could do it because video broadcast was not allowed for civilian broadband

Sir Ben:

the last time I looked at getting a ham license was in the early two thousands, late 1990s, because where we were living, there was not cell phone availability and being able to make a call using a ham radio was a thing.

Sir Gene:

yeah, yeah. But I already had a satellite phone before I became a ham.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, I did not have a satellite phone and

Sir Gene:

Oh, well there there's your problem right there?

Sir Ben:

dude satellite phone in the 1990s. How much was your bill a month. And why did you think you needed that?

Sir Gene:

No, not it was in the nineties. Oh no, it was in the nineties. Yeah, it was in nineties. It was in the late nineties was in the early nineties. But no, I got a cell phone in,

Sir Ben:

Probably in Iridium network phone,

Sir Gene:

Nope, Nope,

Sir Ben:

some Russian network. I mean,

Sir Gene:

no, no, it's it wasn't Iridium. It was the other one. Iridium is lower abit. This was the higher theba. This is a high powers. Satphone that literally worked anywhere. Unlike Iridium, but I got, I got a special deal on it because I had certain. Needs that were authorized for it. And so I actually had unlimited air time, which is something unheard of for satellite

Sir Ben:

okay. What what three letter government agency were you working for at the time?

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Not all agencies have three letters, but but that may have had something that, that may have had something to do with my getting that phone.

Sir Ben:

almost have to be, especially with the unlimited air.

Sir Gene:

was also, it was also set up with a breakthrough priority. So that calls originating from that phone in case of a emergency in the us would always go through

Sir Ben:

Yep. You know what? I, I will bet you 10. I, I would bet you some money that my cell phone is still has not been removed from my previous employer's

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I'm sure. I'm sure that's probably true. I don't think they ever remove 'em

Sir Ben:

No.

Sir Gene:

it's too much work to track that shit. And yeah. Yeah. In fact, I even had I kinda invited Adam to sign up for that back in the day he, he had a priority push through, but,

Sir Ben:

and what we're talking about for those that don't know is when the cell network with something happens and too many people try to use the cell network work at once that you, you can't

Sir Gene:

it prioritizes government services

Sir Ben:

government services. And then key industry players are also prioritized.

Sir Gene:

Yep.

Sir Ben:

So for instance, me working at a utility is why I ended up with

Sir Gene:

Yeah, or me being unemployed either or so. Yeah, that was so I get my ham after having that phone and you know, mostly what I found that was annoying with that is while the phone worked fine, when you were stationary anywhere in the world. So whether I was in Europe or middle east or somewhere else, everything worked fine. But if I was on the boat, going from the us to Canada, it didn't work I was

Sir Ben:

making a drug run

Sir Gene:

God, damnit, this is so stupid. Well, apparently the boat speeds too fast or something. And I I'm trying to make a, a set phone call and it, it it's like just, I don't know if it's changing satellites or what it's doing, but it didn't work very well.

Sir Ben:

Mm. So why were you on a boat going into Canada?

Sir Gene:

I go into Canada on boats all the time. Doesn't everybody.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

How do you go to Canada?

Sir Ben:

usually in a car and, you know, going through the border,

Sir Gene:

well, sometimes the boat is a faster way to go.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Yeah. Especially if you're wanting to avoid certain inspections.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. There's usually not any extensions on, on, on boats. Although you do have to call it in

Sir Ben:

Hmm.

Sir Gene:

and if it's, if it's not a us registered boat, then you do have inspections. So you actually are better off having us.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, well, having been on some in inspections by the coast guard, I, I can say that fuck the coast guard. I'm not a fan.

Sir Gene:

Fuck the ghost. Yeah, they are kind of pricks it. I think they've

Sir Ben:

coast guard in

Sir Gene:

not a real agency mentality going

Sir Ben:

The coast guard in Alaska where they actually save people's lives and things like that are, you know, fine. But as a kid, I remember it being held at gunpoint by some landlocked asshole that grew up in, you know, probably Iowa and didn't know anything about boats while they searched while they searched our boats. So yeah, not, not a fan.

Sir Gene:

what are they looking for? The emergency flare.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. They were looking for drugs and it, it was a drug inspection cuz we were off the coast of Texas, you know, down near Brownsville and you know, it was just a routine inspection and you know, if you, they immediately ask you, if you have a firearm on the vessel and of course you say, you know, yes. And tell 'em where it's at and then they go hide the gun during their inspection while you're on the back, deck held at gunpoint and then they hide the ammo somewhere else because you know, you're, you're obviously submitting to the inspection, but you're, you're. You're gonna shoot him. And you know, this kid, I remember this vividly he's, you know, 18 years old and has an M 16 pointed right at me and is literally shaking, cuz this is probably the first time he is

Sir Gene:

He shouldn't be pointing at you. He

Sir Ben:

No, he shouldn't have been, it should have been low ready but this is, this is the fucking problem I have with the coast guard. You know, they, they, they are a military agency that man, they just don't

Sir Gene:

they technically are, but they're, they're the least respected military agency.

Sir Ben:

Space force I think space force says that new title, but

Sir Gene:

Um, I don't know, man. They're, they're spending money left and right here in Austin space force is just like setting up all kinds of programs.

Sir Ben:

all right. Anyway I also, when the coast guard showed up, when our vessel was sinking they screwed up and were pumping water into the boat for three and a half hours. So

Sir Gene:

okay. That has to be bullshit. There's no way they can't know the difference.

Sir Ben:

They literally fucked it up and were pumping water into the boat for three and a half hours. The deck hand had all the electronics

Sir Gene:

Did, did you Sue them?

Sir Ben:

you can't Sue the governments.

Sir Gene:

Yes, you can.

Sir Ben:

No, you really can't.

Sir Gene:

happens all the time.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

If dust coast guard San your boat, you could totally Sue them.

Sir Ben:

Here, here. Here's the, here's the other thing, they also hit us with a $500,000 oil spill. Fine after.

Sir Gene:

What,

Sir Ben:

Yep,

Sir Gene:

how did you just spill that much oil?

Sir Ben:

because it was a 75, a 75 foot shrimp boat going out for the, you know, the, the opening and was full of fuel.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And the fuel was leaking. It wasn't contained.

Sir Ben:

The, the boat sank

Sir Gene:

Right. But the fuel should be inside. Not outside.

Sir Ben:

it still. Yeah. Okay. Well anyway, long, long story long. Well, my parents did and they, but it was a huge financial loss to our family at the time.

Sir Gene:

Well, yeah, losing your boat would be a big loss.

Sir Ben:

well, it's more than that. So they had just redone the ice hold on. The boat, did a lot of upgrades was heading out for the Texas open. It was one of the first times my dad wasn't on the boat and thank God he wasn't cuz he probably would've. It would just not have gone well. And anyway, hit a underwater obstruction. Someone was, they were dredging the, the channel and they had lost some pipe and well, we found it and knocked about a three and a half foot hole right behind the fuel tank. So you couldn't get to it. And anyway, started taking on water and coast guard shows up and for the first three and a half hours was pumping water into the boat. The the deck hand who was taking the vessel out for us, had all the electronics disconnected and sitting on the back deck to offload. And by the way, this is in 1994. So

Sir Gene:

of.

Sir Ben:

all three, what?

Sir Gene:

Electronics

Sir Ben:

Oh, no. Plotters radios lot radar systems. I mean, probably about 50 grand at the time worth of electronics. Anyway, it was a huge financial loss to the family

Sir Gene:

I bet. Do I? You didn't have insurance.

Sir Ben:

it didn't matter. It's inside coastal waters inside protected waters, no insurance policies pay out and stuff like that.

Sir Gene:

What do you mean?

Sir Ben:

I mean, in the maritime insurance policies would not pay out on

Sir Gene:

Oh, okay. Cause I had insurance on my boat and that was, you know, that would pay out in the like,

Sir Ben:

You weren't operating a commercial

Sir Gene:

no, that's true. Yeah. That was a pleasure, pleasure craft.

Sir Ben:

There's a big difference.

Sir Gene:

So they don't, they, they only cover while you're in open water.

Sir Ben:

Pretty much.

Sir Gene:

Aren't like 90% of boating accidents. Not in open water,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, but that's not for commercial vessels, you know,

Sir Gene:

but you're still coming in and out.

Sir Ben:

All right. But

Sir Gene:

Oh, you get to the intercostal

Sir Ben:

So here, here's the thing you would have. This is why the ship channel pilots and association and so on is such a thing is because the only way you can get insurance to cover it. And most ports require,

Sir Gene:

of the board.

Sir Ben:

a pilot, a board to actually operate for the, that water. But that's for the big boys for the, the small, you know, shrimping vessels, commercial fishing, stuff like that. It's a very different story, but you still fall into those categories where, you know, you're a ship, not a boat. And you know, it, it, it gets real murky real quick,

Sir Gene:

Hmm. Yeah. That sucks, dude. So what'd your parents end up doing?

Sir Ben:

Saying, fuck it. And move to Idaho.

Sir Gene:

Oh, that's how you ended up in that L

Sir Ben:

They, they had bought some property up in Idaho that they were planning on retiring to and decided to have a major life shift.

Sir Gene:

I can't believe the coast guard San your boat though. That's insane.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

That's nuts. Hmm.

Sir Ben:

You suck my boat. sorry.

Sir Gene:

So was that your battleship?

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Yeah. But anyway, it, it, it, I I'm, it was a hell of a shift going from pretty upper middle class to ouch that hurt to we're moving to Idaho and yeah.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm Wow. Yeah. Well, it's the risk of having your, your money tied up in your business?

Sir Ben:

No. Yeah. I mean, I mean, it is what it is, but yeah,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Hmm. Well, I mean like, look at farmers, right? Same thing.

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

Technically on paper, almost every farm, farmer's a millionaire

Sir Ben:

easily. Yes.

Sir Gene:

but they're basically landless leasing their crop.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. To an extent. You know, but most farms at this point are commercial operations, not, not family farms. The family farm is fading really

Sir Gene:

It it's fading. Yeah. But that's mostly people that I've known have had family farms.

Sir Ben:

Me, me too, and family cattle operations and everything else. But you get into a summer like this, where you've gotta drought and not a lot of hay. And you know, it's really expensive. I mean, hell the, the, the rice farmers in in the Beaumont area are literally bailing the rice fields right now because there's so little, Hey,

Sir Gene:

Yep, yep. That's nuts. But I, I was talking to Tucker and their 40 acres or 40 ish acres. They've got, I think it's a little more than that, but that can only support three head of cattle.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. If he's, if he's not running, if he's not, if, if he's not supplementing and he's not on like improved coastal or something, it also depends on the grass that he's got and whether or not he's irrigating and so on. Yeah. You need like, on an improved coastal,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

you can probably get away with, you know, three to four acres ahead, depending on the area of Texas you're in. So you could probably do a little bit more than that, but just depending on the grass type and everything else.

Sir Gene:

And then you look at like, you know, Kind of where I was in Minnesota or Iowa or anywhere around there. And it's like, you know, it's, it's probably multiple heads for acre.

Sir Ben:

No but

Sir Gene:

it looked like it.

Sir Ben:

yeah, well, but the, the problem there you have, so here you can basically get away with not supplementing a whole lot in the winter. Right. So if he's looking at doing so if he's only at like two or three head for that 40 acres, I'd I'd make a couple assumptions. One, he's got it broken up into multiple fields and he's hanging one field while feeding on the other, and then using that hay for the winter that I can see him doing it that way. If he's not, if he's trying to not buy any hay.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

so, a hundred square feet per cow is what it says here in Minnesota.

Sir Ben:

No fucking way,

Sir Gene:

Well, I don't know Minnesota beef industry.

Sir Ben:

By the way, next time you talk to Tucker tell him I've got a copy that a friend of mine gave to me when or an ex-girlfriend actually of, I hope they serve beer in hell. That I'd love for him to sign.

Sir Gene:

Well, I'm gonna see him on Monday. You wanna get the book to me by then?

Sir Ben:

I can try. You'll have to send me your address.

Sir Gene:

do you want that particular book or do you want me to go to a bookstore and buy

Sir Ben:

No, it's a joke. It's fine. It's all good, man. I

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Sir Ben:

that, that, I mean, I never

Sir Gene:

I'm gonna try and get 'em on a podcast too. Yeah, so, so two acres per cow. Does that sound right?

Sir Ben:

Yeah. That

Sir Gene:

That sounds better. Okay.

Sir Ben:

And you know, again, that's

Sir Gene:

Two acres per cow. Yeah. I don't know where I got a hundred square feet.

Sir Ben:

yeah, yeah. I

Sir Gene:

uh, that's probably like the amount of land that they need to walk around on has nothing to do with the food. So with the food, it's two acres per cow.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And anyway, but you know, you compare that to three or four here, depending, and then you also compare to your sheltering requirements and all that, you know,

Sir Gene:

yeah. And you

Sir Ben:

don't have to shelter your cattle in the winter, in Texas. Most of the time,

Sir Gene:

Right. Yeah. That's true. Yeah, I think my problem with cows, if I had like, ranch or something is I would just, they would turn into pets. So I could probably do a milk cow or a couple, but I couldn't do a slaughter cow. It would be a pet.

Sir Ben:

cows are really dumb animals. So I don't know how attached to them you would get. I mean, I grew up with us having cows and raising 'em

Sir Gene:

I have a snake dude.

Sir Ben:

okay.

Sir Gene:

Do you think the snake's smarter than the cow?

Sir Ben:

Cows are pretty dumb, but no. But I also

Sir Gene:

are dumb, but they also have that dopey looking innocent face with the big eyelashes and the big nose.

Sir Ben:

calves are, you know, adorable cows, not so

Sir Gene:

I totally disagree. Calves are way too bony. I don't like seeing all them hip bones and shoulder bones sticking out. I, when a cow gets actually probably about a yearling is when they're at the cutest, I think.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

Cause BA baby calves just look anorexic.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

Well, do you disagree? I mean, you know what I'm talking about? They're bones just stick out.

Sir Ben:

I, I, I think that you, you must have been around some malnourished calves because

Sir Gene:

at all, dude.

Sir Ben:

within a week they should be pretty filled out.

Sir Gene:

No, no, it takes a lot more than that.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

No, I, I go to a raw dairy every time. I've been up in in the Washington area.

Sir Ben:

How much dairy do you consume?

Sir Gene:

I don't, I'm not allergi to dairy, unlike most adults. So I actually, I don't drink much dairy. But I really like UN pasteurized milk.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

And so I whenever there's an opportunity to buy milk directly from a cow, I, I usually go and take it.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Fresh butter. That's that?

Sir Gene:

Yeah, totally.

Sir Ben:

good.

Sir Gene:

And I've got a butter maker.

Sir Ben:

A butter churn

Sir Gene:

Well, it's not a churn. It's actually a center Fuge, but it'll make butter. It'll, it'll separate out the particulates.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

So you get butter and way.

Sir Ben:

yep.

Sir Gene:

Do you like way

Sir Ben:

No,

Sir Gene:

I like way

Sir Ben:

I don't like how to cheese either.

Sir Gene:

it's slightly salty or stringent maybe is a better word for it. And it, it's a very good drink for the summer cold way.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm all right. Little miss M

Sir Gene:

And that's no tough. Its

Sir Ben:

yeah. Yeah. Little miss M sat

Sir Gene:

what else we got. So we talked about everything that

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I, I think we have at this point.

Sir Gene:

All right. For, for the one person that's still listening to the end of the podcast after all the topics that we've jumped

Sir Ben:

Thank, thank you, CSB.

Sir Gene:

Oh yeah. Right. you know that fucker's probably downloading

Sir Ben:

you know, what's gonna be funny. Someone's gonna, he's probably gonna be like, ah, screw this and drop, and then someone's gonna, you know, Hey, they mentioned you at the end of the show and Have to go back and listen to everything.

Sir Gene:

yes. Don't give him a time code, whatever you do. Don't give him a time code.

Sir Ben:

the time

Sir Gene:

oh, that's so mean. That's so mean. Yeah, no. And, and CSB, you know, I, I, until he got insane with this whole Ukraine thing, I, I, I kind of thought he was, he was a cool dude.

Sir Ben:

Oh, shit. That is something we should have talked about, but

Sir Gene:

there something go down with Ukraine?

Sir Ben:

yeah. Zappia the power

Sir Gene:

Oh, the power plant. Yeah. So what's I mean, I know there's been like missiles flying at it, but so far they haven't hit anything

Sir Ben:

high Mars

Sir Gene:

Well, of course they are. Cuz that's what the Americans are shooting. Oh, I'm sorry. Did I say Americans? I, I meant to say Ukrainians.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, except the Americans are having to call in the targets for the high Mars,

Sir Gene:

kind of true.

Sir Ben:

problematic. And I know you don't believe in, you know, any war crimes or anything, but according to the Geneva convention, attacking a nuclear power plant is, you know, not kosher.

Sir Gene:

I just, yeah, I, I, the idea of a separate category of crimes in the war to me just seems crazy.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But I mean, who wants, you know, fallout across Europe? It just

Sir Gene:

America, America does. Are you kidding? That would be great for us as a country.

Sir Ben:

How so?

Sir Gene:

It would create a whole bunch of people that are even more dependent on buying from. And it would reduce competition in a number of markets. This would not be a, a loss for America. If Europe were oppos to radiated,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well,

Sir Gene:

do you disagree?

Sir Ben:

I think it would be very hard for the entire world given the amount of food that comes out of Ukraine typically.

Sir Gene:

But that food doesn't go to Europe.

Sir Ben:

No, it goes to Africa mostly.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I mean anyone who doesn't. Alright. I'll just say this as much as, as much as we're talking about conflict between Russia and China and America, even if the dollar's value is cut in half. Again, most of our food production and everything domestically, Americans will not starve to death. We might get a little lean. We might not have strawberries, but we'll

Sir Gene:

In the winter

Sir Ben:

Right. But I will say this based off of what is going on

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Africa is fucked. I mean, we're a lot of people are gonna die of starvation in Africa.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, no, that's true. Then we'll, we'll have TV commercials showing pictures of starving black children and asking for a dollar a day to help them eat. I, I, yeah. I mean, this is all true, but again, this doesn't really affect the us. So if Europe becomes radiated, the us is.

Sir Ben:

Well, except, you know, Russia having proof that high Mars are being fired at Zia, that the us is targeting those high Mars. And it's not just counter battery fire at this point. That, that, that really tell me why, what, what, what is stopping Russia gene from just saying we're at war with the us at this point?

Sir Gene:

Well, there's no benefit to doing so. And they have said they're war with NATO. They have said that.

Sir Ben:

Yes, they are fighting the war against NATO, but the why isn't there a declaration of war and an expansion of the conflict outside of.

Sir Gene:

I, I don't know. I mean, I think

Sir Ben:

Why is Russia content to allow Ukraine to be a proxy for NATO?

Sir Gene:

I think that there's probably not a significant benefit in doing so at this point, I, I mean, clearly people are paid to think about this shit on a daily basis, and right now, if they haven't declared war, then that means that there's a benefit to not doing so or no benefit to doing so. Yes. That would be the other way of putting it.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. China also has said no foreign military craft in the Taiwanese straits

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

and we're selling some aircraft carrier groups to the Taiwanese

Sir Gene:

well, not only that we're talking about moving more of our military to that region as.

Sir Ben:

Yep.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I mean, it's, it's all gonna depend on whether China and Russia are content to just let the us financially sink or if they want to combine that with lives lost. And I don't know, maybe I'm wrong in this, but I just given the current financial climate and inflation here, I just don't see the average American being in support of thousands. And it will be thousands, tens of thousands of American lives lost, helping to fight a losing battle for an island off the coast of China.

Sir Ben:

Hmm.

Sir Gene:

At least with Ukraine, there is a, there's this sense of like, well, that's Europe, you know, we're helping Europe against that evil Russia. This is China versus separatist China. And I don't like the communist government in China there, it's not at all. What, what I'm getting at my point is after as many years of Chinese rule, as we've had with the current government in China, the communist government, the argument against the reunification of China becomes weaker and weak.

Sir Ben:

I would say that the fact that Taiwan has stayed a separate nation for this long.

Sir Gene:

But it hasn't been a separate

Sir Ben:

It has, and up until the 1970s, we recognized Taiwan as China. And then we, what we should have never agreed to is the won China policy. What we should have done is recognized the China communist party and then said, but you know what, we're also gonna recognize Taiwan as a free and country.

Sir Gene:

yeah, that was a mistake at the time, but I think it's a little too late now.

Sir Ben:

Well, I don't know China released the white paper talking about a two systems, one government and Taiwan rejected it.

Sir Gene:

How that went in Hong Kong, cuz that was also two systems, one government or two governments, one system, whatever the fuck.

Sir Ben:

two economic systems, one government. Yeah, we have the example of Hong Kong. Japan seems to be gearing up for war after China shot some missiles into their territorial waters and

Sir Gene:

Well Japan. Yeah. I mean

Sir Ben:

lanes in the world.

Sir Gene:

I think as expected

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I, I mean, I, I, I don't know, man,

Sir Gene:

Japan can't do anything though. Here's the thing

Sir Ben:

They, they have a defensive force. They have made some constitutional changes

Sir Gene:

it, it literally is seven nukes to take out the entire country. Not the single Japanese person will.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

That's it seven nukes. They can't afford to do anything. You have to be insane to think that China won't use nuclear weapons

Sir Ben:

Why.

Sir Gene:

because they're there.

Sir Ben:

Okay. And then someone ends up Ning Beijing.

Sir Gene:

They might, they might Beijing, but unless that's my point is that somebody has to be a an NIS or they have to have a death wish to do actions that will guaranteed provoke a nuclear strike. And that's what we have in the us right now. We're, we're very much pushing forward with trying to get Russia to use nukes. And now we're gonna do the same thing in in China. Well guess what, if both of 'em launched the same time we are fucked. No, no amount of anti missile technology is gonna help that

Sir Ben:

well, one thing I'd say, I think we have, we are the only country that really has any defensive systems around ICBMs now, some of the hypersonics.

Sir Gene:

been tested, not with the missiles they would have to go up

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So we'd have to see. So even if there's a, you know, 50% success rate, that's something

Sir Gene:

Is it though?

Sir Ben:

yeah. I, when you're talking to me,

Sir Gene:

we have, we have four times as many nuclear weapons as are needed to cover the entire globe right now, worldwide. So 50% success rate means we can only have two missiles for every piece of the globe.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, but the, the it's not gonna be carpet bombing. Right. It's gonna be strategic,

Sir Gene:

It is, it is, it's gonna be San Antonio, Dallas Fort worth.

Sir Ben:

not

Sir Gene:

So if you're in the, and if you're in the panhandle, sorry, when I said Dallas Fort worth, I meant Dallas. Houston. Yeah. Yeah. It's I, I don't think there's any value in, in hitting the panhandle. You know what I mean?

Sir Ben:

our west, Texas. Yeah. You know, except there are some silos in and around Texas,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. But you know where most of 'em are as up north

Sir Ben:

actually, a lot of 'em are down around the coast, but,

Sir Gene:

there, but most of 'em are up

Sir Ben:

but this is also an older missile system that has been since retired. Yeah. I mean, we'll see.

Sir Gene:

it's, I just think that it it's like, here's what it is. You're, you're inside a cage with somebody else and you you can cooperate and leave peacefully. Or you can poke a stick at each other and kill each other. And we seem to be held, bent on poking somebody with a stick right now. Not because they're doing anything to us, mind you, Russia's not doing anything to us. China's not doing anything to the us

Sir Ben:

totally, totally manipulating the us economy and doing lots of things that,

Sir Gene:

but you know, Russia manipulated Trump too. So there you go. My point is we're the ones initiating military action, and it's gonna get us in trouble. And the only question is, will the other countries be able to just put up with what the us was doing long enough for the us to go bankrupt? Or will they respond sooner?

Sir Ben:

well, we we'll see if I, I think if China sinks an aircraft carrier, that's going through the Taiwan east streets. If we had a functioning president, I, I, if we had a functioning president, I think we nuke Beijing.

Sir Gene:

if we nuke Beijing that is literally killing every person in the us

Sir Ben:

I don't

Sir Gene:

is that the deci I do is that the decision to present. And I guarantee you, the people that are providing that information to the president will tell you the same thing. We can nuke Beijing. But that means the extermination of the us population is that worth doing,

Sir Ben:

I would have to look at how many ICBMs China has, and I would have to know there's lots of things, but what, what do you think the us response should be to an aircraft carrier? Getting sunk in Taiwan, straits

Sir Gene:

apology,

Sir Ben:

from China?

Sir Gene:

to China for invading their sovereignty.

Sir Ben:

yeah, no it's international waters. So no, and China does

Sir Gene:

the Monroe doctrine.

Sir Ben:

China does not get

Sir Gene:

What's the Monroe doctrine,

Sir Ben:

I, I didn't say I necessarily agreed with the Monroe doctrine,

Sir Gene:

but you agree that exists.

Sir Ben:

Yes.

Sir Gene:

Okay. Do you think it's that there, there isn't anything that's similar in any other part of the world to the

Sir Ben:

China sinks our aircraft carrier, if, if they sink one of our ships in quote unquote, internationally recognized international waters,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

there would no an apology would it, the apology would come at the tip of the sphere.

Sir Gene:

yeah, us is. Fuck dude. You, you still under delusion that we live in the superpower. We don't, we, we live in the failing banana Republic right now.

Sir Ben:

We'll see.

Sir Gene:

Well, I hope we don't. I really do hope we don't because I need to sell a lot more product. That that will eight people in living in the aftermath.

Sir Ben:

Hey, when's that beta site coming up?

Sir Gene:

Yeah, it'll be a while. So I'm still in the process of designing the box for the first product of the multitude of products. Soon as that's done, we'll get that done. Soon as we get the physical products, then we'll get the beta site up so best, best guess probably a month and a half to three months,

Sir Ben:

okay. Oh,

Sir Gene:

but we we'll have it up. We'll have it up. I had a positive response. It looked like there's only about 28% of the no agenda. Social population are Polish.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, one of those is me.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Actually, and the other one is Darren, so,

Sir Ben:

the same

Sir Gene:

oh, hell yeah. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Love

Sir Gene:

Uhhuh,

Sir Ben:

love it.

Sir Gene:

you know, we got friends like this who need enemies

Sir Ben:

yeah. What was that? Quote the forget. I think it was Harding.

Sir Gene:

And meanwhile, CSB probably voted for it because he wants to have access.

Sir Ben:

it, it's not my enemies that keep me up night. I can handle my enemies. It's my friends, my God friends.

Sir Gene:

no, it's true. But a again, I think what kept the USSR and the us maintaining polite relationships is the threat of mutual Anni. Somehow with, and I, I think it happened when the Soviet union fell, but somehow that threat seems to have disappeared from politic, from the politicians, from their, their, their psyche. And then they're under this delusion that the threat of annihilation ceased to exist. And it has not,

Sir Ben:

well, I, let me ask you this. But doesn't that threat of annihilation still go both ways, both towards China and

Sir Gene:

oh, absolutely. It does. But the difference between Ning a carrier group, and it's not a carrier, it'd be a whole group and Ning, the entirety of a country is that you can walk away from one of 'em. You can't walk away from the

Sir Ben:

Okay. So for, let's say they sync a carrier group and we then sync the three carriers that they have,

Sir Gene:

Which would be nothing to them. They would laugh at them. They would. Yeah, no, if we, if

Sir Ben:

would destroy their Navy. They would have no Naval power.

Sir Gene:

they would have no Naval power at which they don't really need.

Sir Ben:

They need Naval power to invade Taiwan.

Sir Gene:

They don't, they really don't. They can literally build a bridge to Taiwan. One. They have the manpowers do it.

Sir Ben:

okay.

Sir Gene:

I'm being slightly hyperbolic here, obviously. But my point is that for China. The Navy that they do need is not the military Navy. It's the commercial Navy, the trade

Sir Ben:

merchant Marine. Yep, absolutely.

Sir Gene:

it's because they are the, the, the guys in star wars that are the trade Federation.

Sir Ben:

Okay. So, you know, take out their aircraft carrier groups and sync a bunch of their commercial ships.

Sir Gene:

Well, but here's the thing. It's one thing to take out their military, right. That can go without a direct response or without an escalated response. Once you start taking out civilians, you're the bad guy.

Sir Ben:

No, you're in a declared war scenario at this point. And you absolutely attack

Sir Gene:

Okay. Here's the other thing to consider the majority of their shipping is with us.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

So what are you gonna, I mean, if you take out their,

Sir Ben:

Okay. So when they get here, just say, all right, Chinese crew, get on this airplane. We're flying you back and we're taking your

Sir Gene:

well, we probably just put 'em in internment camps. We have a history of doing that.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. FEMA camps. They're ready to go, man.

Sir Gene:

They're ready to go, oh no, those are gonna be used for a whole other group of people. That's the people on the registered gather owner lists. So I, I just think that there's not a good scenario here because we don't have a neat either a particularly strong military advantage. We've given that up. The other country is caught up

Sir Ben:

not fully.

Sir Gene:

enough.

Sir Ben:

Mm.

Sir Gene:

And we are seeing that in Ukraine where the testing of the American and European, not just American, but there's weapons coming from a lot, a lot of the European countries. You know, they're, the weapons are being tested and they're not performing any better.

Sir Ben:

I think they're doing pretty good considering probably less than a third are actually seeing combat use

Sir Gene:

that's cuz two thirds of 'em have been destroyed array.

Sir Ben:

or no I've been sold on the black market.

Sir Gene:

Well,

Sir Ben:

Did you, did you not see in the Moscow symposium where they had bought us armaments on the black market and were showing them off against the Russian made armaments? Yep.

Sir Gene:

No, I, I did not. I I'll have to track that

Sir Ben:

Oh yeah, yeah. Yeah. And they're basically saying that the, the Russian perspective is that you know, that the us weapons are made for an asymmetric war that they require constant maintenance and this, that, and the other

Sir Gene:

I mean the micro version of that was the AK versus the AR in Vietnam and the, the AR platform was way more unreliable. It got dirty. It got jammed. It got overheated. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, the, the M 16, when it, the first issue was the non Chrome line barrels going into a juggle environment, as soon as they Chromelin the barrels and took care of the issue. Yeah, it, it, but I would say this, the modern in four platform has evolved is as reliable as an, a AK out there.

Sir Gene:

No, I don't think so.

Sir Ben:

I do. I, and not only that,

Sir Gene:

Well, we could do a test. We could just keep shooting until one of the guns jams.

Sir Ben:

okay.

Sir Gene:

And I GU tell you, I know which one's gonna jam first.

Sir Ben:

Okay. I know the accuracy. I know the, you know, the, you, you can't really Mount optics to the AK platform. There's lots of different things that give the advantage to

Sir Gene:

I don't know my AK you can Mount anything. You want to

Sir Ben:

Uhhuh. Sure.

Sir Gene:

an really AK

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm and, and where's the mounting point on that? How accurate is it gonna be at what distance are we fighting?

Sir Gene:

It doesn't matter.

Sir Ben:

It, it really does.

Sir Gene:

No, no. It's, it's, it's gonna be perfectly accurate. It's been described as the most accurate AK you can buy.

Sir Ben:

Okay. I guarantee it doesn't shoot sub two MOA.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, it probably is right around there.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Okay. Every AR platform that I have is easily MOA or better.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Like I said, let's just keep shooting until one again, jams and I know which one's gonna jam first.

Sir Ben:

Okay. Night vision, Russian military. Can't operate at night. Let's get

Sir Gene:

I've got night vision mounted on mine. I don't know what the hell you're talking.

Sir Ben:

Is that us made night vision.

Sir Gene:

Of course,

Sir Ben:

Okay. There you go.

Sir Gene:

there you go.

Sir Ben:

Anyway, there, there, there're just total difference. Jean,

Sir Gene:

I think the AR platform is symbolic and that's the only reason that people have as much of it as they do it is by no means a superior platform.

Sir Ben:

I think it's a very good platform for lots of things. I'm, I'm really looking forward to the M five and getting that when, you know, the prices come down and it's available in a

Sir Gene:

Yeah. What is it? Five grand right now.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And, and it's only available in the, the 2 27 fury, you know, and I, I, I don't want that cartridge, give it to me in a 300 wind mag or a 3 0 8 and I'll be

Sir Gene:

And I, I totally agree. I think that is a good platform. I like that one,

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

you know, and I don't like the, the AK 47 in particular, the one that I

Sir Ben:

By the way. I think the only reason why the Russians have stuck with the AK platform is because of the symbolic nature of it.

Sir Gene:

Well, what do you mean stuck with it?

Sir Ben:

I mean, I'll, I'll send you I'll send

Sir Gene:

mean as far as, yeah,

Sir Ben:

you can, you can see what they,

Sir Gene:

my, my favorite gun is actually the a N 94.

Sir Ben:

mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

I would love to get that and it's never gonna happen, but.

Sir Ben:

Why not?

Sir Gene:

Because it's full lotto.

Sir Ben:

Well, you mean, okay.

Sir Gene:

there's no semi a version of it.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

And

Sir Ben:

said you don't mind doing NFA.

Sir Gene:

yeah, well, it's also manufactured after the cutoff date, but which is what, 1984, I believe it's cutoff date.

Sir Ben:

I, I don't know. I'd have to go look.

Sir Gene:

I think that's what it was and the, the whole, the whole

Sir Ben:

go buy one in a different country, you know, on your trip. And then when you're coming in,

Sir Gene:

Could definitely

Sir Ben:

know, just fly back private and there,

Sir Gene:

But the whole point of it is it does two shots in one impulse, which is super cool

Sir Ben:

you know, you can get triggers for your AR to do that legally.

Sir Gene:

to do two shots in one

Sir Ben:

Yeah, binary triggers.

Sir Gene:

How does that work?

Sir Ben:

So a binary trigger and I've looked at this, but I just, it, it would just be a toy. Has three positions, one is safe. Two is semi and then three is binary and the binary fires on the pull and the release.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. That's totally different, dude.

Sir Ben:

I understand, but it's considered semiautomatic. So as you pull the trigger and then release the trigger, it's

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I mean, that'd be, that would still be kind of cool. I'm sure it's illegal,

Sir Ben:

no, it's legal, perfectly legal,

Sir Gene:

Until they change their mind and it becomes illegal. And then now you're on the list, but this thing,

Sir Ben:

bought one, but

Sir Gene:

yeah, this, this, this literally shoots two rounds before the the impulse to your shoulder from the first round actually is, felt

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

it it's. The first two rounds are at like 1200 rounds per minute.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

So it's, it's super fast. So it literally as soon as the first bullet is fired, it sticks the second one in, before the cartridges even kicked out.

Sir Ben:

Well, how does it do that with one

Sir Gene:

Well, no, I mean, it's obviously it's in motion already being pulled out, but before it flips out of the gun, there's already a second one loaded in shooting,

Sir Ben:

Uhhuh.

Sir Gene:

but it's a, it's a really cool gun. It's a really cool gun. The problem was, it was slightly overly complex and therefore not adopted but it was manufactured for about a six year period.

Sir Ben:

So we should probably call it given we're at almost three hours.

Sir Gene:

Oh yeah. Yeah. People like that long form though. Okay. Fair enough. We'll wrap it up, but you, you get me talking about some of these cooler guns that are not popular. I'm I'm happy to do that for a long period of time, but if anyone hasn't seen it, definitely check out the a 94. And by the way, do you know what the, a in AK or a N stands for

Sir Ben:

What

Sir Gene:

automatic?

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

It's the Russian word FTA, which means automatic.

Sir Ben:

Gotcha.

Sir Gene:

Oh, and then in this particular, and in this particular context, it's an automatic weapon, not just automatic, but the word itself was just automatic. But it means like Colossian co, which is just means Colossian cuffs, automatic

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Versus AR meaning yeah, not automatic

Sir Gene:

armor light. Yeah. Yep. Yeah. And why wasn't it called the, the ES 16, the Eugene stoner 16 or something, or the stoner automatic, the essay,

Sir Ben:

I don't know.

Sir Gene:

the SA 16.

Sir Ben:

should have taken more credit

Sir Gene:

He should have. Did you ever see that video where stoner and Klasko met?

Sir Ben:

no, no,

Sir Gene:

They, they met once. Yeah. They met once after the fall Soviet union. And

Sir Ben:

Wow. That, that would, that, that would, I would like to be a fly in,

Sir Gene:

right. Well, there was a camera there, so you don't have to be fly. But they actually, they recorded that, that meeting. It was they were giving each other shit about the weapons

Sir Ben:

They didn't say, Hey, let's design a new weapon together. Let's let's make the perfect item ever.

Sir Gene:

the best gun to kill them all. Yes,

Sir Ben:

yes.

Sir Gene:

no, no. It's but

Sir Ben:

that's what, that's why that's why Russia should have been allowed to join NATO

Sir Gene:

I totally agree. I mean, you imagine like NATO would've become like every other country would've been afraid of NA then

Sir Ben:

It would've it. Well, I mean, had Russia joined NATO, it would've become the defacto

Sir Gene:

thanks George Bush.

Sir Ben:

Yep. Well, I think it was Clinton actually, but yes,

Sir Gene:

No, it was Bush. Wasn't it? Bush, are you

Sir Ben:

they didn't approach joining NATO until the Clinton administration.

Sir Gene:

So 92.

Sir Ben:

Was the

Sir Gene:

Yeah, that would've been cl yeah. And the bushes. Yeah, you're right. You're right. So that was Clinton you're right? Yep. Yeah, it just, it was a delayed reaction,

Sir Ben:

Yes.

Sir Gene:

By Russia there, but see, they should have reached out to Bush. Maybe you would've had a different answer.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Right. The CIA spook.

Sir Gene:

Hey Russia, you should join the CIA Uhhuh.

Sir Ben:

all

Sir Gene:

Anyway, I'm getting kind of tired talking. So let's go ahead and get this puppy wrapped up. Huh?

Sir Ben:

Yep.

Sir Gene:

All right. So everybody, thanks for listen. Which I said an hour ago, I think. But this time actually and if you have anything to say, go ahead and write Ben Ben, what's your email

Sir Ben:

Dude, at name bend.com.

Sir Gene:

due to name ben.com. Perfect. And we will see you once again next week.