Sir Gene Speaks

0076 Sir Gene Speaks with Dude Named Ben

July 14, 2022 Gene Naftulyev Season 2022 Episode 76
Sir Gene Speaks
0076 Sir Gene Speaks with Dude Named Ben
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Sir Gene:

This is sir Jean and with me is always is sir dude named Ben named Ben. See, I got your name right today.

Sir Ben:

Hey finally.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, it only took what three months.

Sir Ben:

it's all good,

Sir Gene:

Oh, it'll be wrong again. Next time. Don't worry.

Sir Ben:

Yeah,

Sir Gene:

How are you today?

Sir Ben:

man. It has been a busy busy week.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, that's what you said last week. Can't use the same thing over and over again.

Sir Ben:

Well, this week was busy keeping up with the news though. I mean

Sir Gene:

Oh, busy in thate. I

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Shinzo Ave.

Sir Gene:

the Japanese dude that got killed.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

What about him?

Sir Ben:

Well, I'm just curious. Is this gonna be the arch duke Ferdinand moment?

Sir Gene:

Well, we are in a quickening, so

Sir Ben:

and what do you exactly mean by quickening?

Sir Gene:

it started,

Sir Ben:

I never watched Highlander. So if that's the reference it's lost on new man.

Sir Gene:

You should watch Skylander it's a little, little goofy, but it's, it's a fun movie.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I had cousins that were very much into the Highlander movies and I just never, never followed, suited.

Sir Gene:

If you got some time in the afternoon, some time or plane flight for that matter might be something to watch.

Sir Ben:

Maybe we'll, we'll see if we'll see if I can even put my headphones on, on this plane flight.

Sir Gene:

Well, maybe not this one. maybe different one.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Maybe a

Sir Gene:

You're going off on vacation here.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I'm gonna go not be at a hundred degree plus weather.

Sir Gene:

You're gonna be at 98 degrees.

Sir Ben:

no 90. Ninety's gonna be the high the entire time we're there. So that's like way better than, you know, the 106 it's gonna be here today.

Sir Gene:

Yes.

Sir Ben:

This is seriously the hottest summer I remember here. Hmm. Yes. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Well, when I first moved to Austin, I think 11 years ago it was a hundred days over a hundred degrees. I don't know if we hit 106, we might have during that time, but I remember that year was the year that convinced me. I need a boat. Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Well, I'm probably gonna sell mine, so there's that

Sir Gene:

oh yeah. Well, I already sold mine a few years ago, so yeah, that, that does happen on the regularity

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And then I'll get another one later, but yeah, with the kids as little as they are right now, my boat's really, I bought it years ago just for me as a fishing boat, but you know, it's not really a family boat, so.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm mm-hmm yeah. There's I, I think boats will probably get cheap as a lot of people start selling. 'em when the economy takes.

Sir Ben:

Is tanking.

Sir Gene:

Well tanks to the degree where people are literally going to be out of money.

Sir Ben:

Well, are you paying attention to the housing market?

Sir Gene:

Not really.

Sir Ben:

Well, it's flipping quick. Like it is moving away from a seller's market very, very quickly.

Sir Gene:

Hmm. Interesting. I wonder if Austin's still affected at all or not?

Sir Ben:

well, I don't think college station or Austin are affected yet, but the, I mean, many areas across the country. My mom's a realtor, so she keeps track of all of this. And apparently it is moving very quickly. And the amount of people who can qualify for loans is shifting his interest rates are shifting, you know,

Sir Gene:

oh yeah, yeah, yeah,

Sir Ben:

on interest rate really matters if you don't have much of a down payment.

Sir Gene:

What matters even if you do. Yeah. I mean, it's, it's literally doesn't how many points is it to double the amount of lifetime payments over 30 years?

Sir Ben:

I don't remember, but you know, the average person thinks of a mortgage very differently than you and I are I right? It's the same way people think of a car payment, which is unfortunate. You know, they, they're just looking at what that payment is a month. They don't really care how long or whatever else, which is why you have 50 year mortgages coming

Sir Gene:

50 now. Shit. I didn't even know that.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, they, they they're there was one new story about 50 year mortgages in the UK that you could inherit,

Sir Gene:

Mm.

Sir Ben:

that's, that's a wonderful thing.

Sir Gene:

So you can pass on your debts to your children. That's awesome.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. The what could possibly go

Sir Gene:

they start shipping people to Australia?

Sir Ben:

again? Yeah,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Again,

Sir Ben:

Debtor's prisons will, will. I, I, I, I will predict now. Debtor's prisons will come back.

Sir Gene:

oh yeah, totally. Well, we've never lost them here in the us.

Sir Ben:

Hmm. How so?

Sir Gene:

Oh, plenty of people are in prison for not paying taxes.

Sir Ben:

Well taxes. Yes. Yeah. Tax Eva. Asian is the one debt you can go to prison for. Agreed.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm yeah. Well, and well was debtor prison in the UK, just for private company. I thought that was also for government related payments.

Sir Ben:

There were several different aspects. I'd have to go back and look at history to be sure,

Sir Gene:

I've never really looked into it. I just, I always just assumed it was money owned to the queen and the queen can throw you into Australia.

Sir Ben:

well, let's a look

Sir Gene:

All right. Well, here you look at that. I'm gonna grab a cup of tea.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, that that'd be very entertaining. Audio I'm sure. So debtors prisons for people who are unable to pay debt. Well, duh so yeah, it was for commercial debt. Essentially there was no way to declare bankruptcy and it could also be for criminal fees in the us, a debtors prison would be considered for like child support would be the only

Sir Gene:

Oh child

Sir Ben:

civil duty one here. But yeah, no, in, in Europe there was a history of instead of bankruptcy, you went to a debtors prison

Sir Gene:

makes sense.

Sir Ben:

for private debt.

Sir Gene:

Speaking of prison, there's a guy named, well, he had a YouTube channel called FPS Russia. I don't know if you've ever seen him. It was a really fun channel cuz he got to play with some really fun toys, a lot of guns. And he, he guy's name was Kyle, but he created this Russian character where he did a fake Russian accent. He a little bit I'm pretty sure.

Sir Ben:

yeah,

Sir Gene:

But I always liked the guy it, and, and I think I still have one of his shirts a t-shirt somewhere. But I mean he made, he was one of the big, I think he had the, he was in the top five YouTube channels back when he was on.

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

He's making real money off YouTube.

Sir Ben:

When YouTube would allow such things.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Cool gun stuff. And now last week I watched some videos of him post prison and he, the guy is a wonderful storyteller. He's just got a ton of stories of his prison experience. Cuz he got railroaded into going to prison.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm what did he go to prison for?

Sir Gene:

He went to prison for having like a quarter ounce of marijuana.

Sir Ben:

Okay. That's typically

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

prison sentence in the us at this point.

Sir Gene:

And I don't thought he gets any prison sentence in the us at this point, but

Sir Ben:

Depends on where you are, but yes.

Sir Gene:

they were basically saying, look, we can take all your stuff and then come up with a whole bunch of charges related to guns for on you. Or you can plead guilty to this one. It's up to you.

Sir Ben:

And we can take all your stuff.

Sir Gene:

They, he said they took $800,000 worth of guns and that he will never get back.

Sir Ben:

that. That just hurts.

Sir Gene:

He seemed to be okay with it.

Sir Ben:

I, I don't know how, but, okay.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm well, and he's a felon, so you can't.

Sir Ben:

own guns anymore. Anyway.

Sir Gene:

But he did mention that he's a really good bow and aha. Now

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I mean, okay. I, you know, felonies, I, I don't think necessarily felonies should disqualify you from voting or gun ownership depending on what the felony was, you know? I, I, I think that you have to the whole story about prison and what we're trying to do is reduce the recidivism rate. Right. We're trying to reconcile and,

Sir Gene:

we were trying to teach new skills to prisoners now to be better prisoners.

Sir Ben:

well, there is the forced labor laws, but, you know, I, I think if there's not a redemptive path, then you're just really forcing people into bad situations, you know? So I, I don't know. I

Sir Gene:

that's kind of what their point is, is that's what they're trying to do.

Sir Ben:

I, I don't think that is the stated purpose of prisons, but okay. I think it's the actual purpose. I think it's what happens, but, you know, I, I, I think restricting someone's rights arbitrarily for, you know, let's say someone commits a financial crime, why should they be removed to their rights, to own bear arms? You know,

Sir Gene:

As a punishment.

Sir Ben:

But it's a punishment that makes no sense. Right? If someone commits a violent act, someone murders someone, or,

Sir Gene:

punishment.

Sir Ben:

well, it's a removal of a right for no, in my mind, just cause you

Sir Gene:

sure, sure. But like, how about whipping, do you think whipping would be an appropriate form of punishment for certain crimes?

Sir Ben:

you mean like a flogging?

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Flogging whipping. Sure.

Sir Ben:

Sure.

Sir Gene:

Can I tailing whatever you wanna call it history

Sir Ben:

I, I, I think in up until modern history, punishment was very different than what it looks like today. You know, the, the term cruel and unusual punishment is very dependent upon the era and history in which you live

Sir Gene:

yeah, like I think the reason I brought that up is because I think most people would say that flogging whipping, whatever would be cruel and unusual, but removing a, a man's right to own a gun for the rest of his life is not cruel. Wow. I would say it's the other way around.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I mean, you ask, do I wanna,

Sir Gene:

Would you rather get wet to lose your guns for lifetime

Sir Ben:

well, or, you know, take X, Y, Z lashings, or go to prison for a year or whatever it is, you know, I, but that. I'll take it, you know, but you know, we're, we're masochist gene, so

Sir Gene:

Well, true enough, but but I think

Sir Ben:

harder. You bastard harder. Sorry.

Sir Gene:

is that all you got mm-hmm exactly

Sir Ben:

hell for that one.

Sir Gene:

gotta help. Plenty of other things too.

Sir Ben:

Oh yeah. yeah.

Sir Gene:

anyway, so I, I think that there's a, well, I, again, onto the topic simply by saying that if anybody hasn't, if you know who Kyle is, or you, you you've watched FBS Russian, you'd probably enjoy listening to his prison tales because he is just a great, he does all the voices, like the fake Russian accent. Isn't the only one he can do. He can do a Hispanic accent. He can do a black accent, and boy does he, and his stories are just fun. They're interesting to hear like he, when he got into prison, you know, you hear the thing about how well you gotta, you gotta find the meanest, baddest looking dude, and then get in the fight with him. It,

Sir Ben:

So th this is actually kind of interesting. Does, is this a YouTube channel or what?

Sir Gene:

yeah, yeah. Yeah. It's not his channel. He was on another show with like a bunch of other gamers. And then, you know, when, I guess he was on there before the prison thing, and then after he came back, that naturally was the topic of convers.

Sir Ben:

So this, this brings up an interesting point. So is that channel monetized?

Sir Gene:

I think so.

Sir Ben:

So there are laws in the us that prevent you from profiting from a crime. So I don't know. It's, it's always interesting when you see stuff like oranges, new black and or Kazinski publishing a book and you know, how loosely enforced those laws are, but they exist.

Sir Gene:

I think there's a difference between profiting from the crime and profiting from the prison experience, like writing a book about your heist would be one thing, writing a book about what happened after you get caught. I think isn't covered by that.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I don't know. It's interesting cuz like industrial society in its future is still available and in print, I don't think Kazinski gets any of that, but cuz that's directly related to, you know, the bombings.

Sir Gene:

could write a book about his prison experience.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. He, he writes a lot of philosophy though.

Sir Gene:

I know there are a lot of people in prison that have published in the past.

Sir Ben:

Hmm. So anything else in the news happen this week that you might want to talk about?

Sir Gene:

Let me think. Well, the, the guide still in the beginning blow up. That's obviously the beginning of the quickening.

Sir Ben:

Dude, that, that actually, I, I was talking to people about that this week and I, I, first of all, it's shocking to me how few people know what the Georgia Guidestones are.

Sir Gene:

Me too, dude. I was talking to my ex-wife yesterday and she's like, what are those? I'm like, you gotta be shitting me.

Sir Ben:

yeah. It it's a, it's amazing how few people realize you know, the globalist monument that it

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

you know, the relations there. But so the Georgia Guidestones being taken down and demolished I think that's really a pretty bold statement of our time.

Sir Gene:

I agree. I think it's a, I mean, I

Sir Ben:

very

Sir Gene:

the video it's it is, but that's all it is. It's just symbolic like that nobody's heard nothing happened. It was basically it's it, it is like in a lot of movies, at least the way it looks like right now that know that that first step of we're not gonna take it anymore.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. A statement of defiance

Sir Gene:

It is a statement of defiance. Exactly. That's a good way to put it. And it is you know, it's not blowing up a building with a bunch of people in it, which the government seems to do without too much care. It's it's really more, it is a statement. I mean, it's, it is like, you'd have to go out there and do this. It's not gonna happen casually. It has to be planned. There is no like, well, I just happen to be walking by with some Dyna weight. But I think it's pointing a finger very directly at the people responsible for the current collapse of society.

Sir Ben:

Absolutely. So we've talked about this on the show previously, but who do you who's your top person that you think was involved with the Guidestones in the creation of them?

Sir Gene:

Oh, I, I, I really have no idea that I don't know. really. I mean, this is it happened so long ago that I, I was not really tracking that topic back then.

Sir Ben:

Come on. You're like 120. You, you weren't paying attention in 1979.

Sir Gene:

no. I, I had other thoughts on my mind in 79

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Uhhuh

Sir Ben:

If you remember the seventies, you weren't really there. Right?

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I've heard that before. Yeah, no, I think the look there, there've always been the, the sh Claus' types. We've seen them in bond movies in the past that, that didn't come out of thin air.

Sir Ben:

I agreed. There's an archetype there.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And certainly oh, what's his name? The Hungarian dude. He was around back then.

Sir Ben:

George

Sir Gene:

Soros was around back then. Yeah. You know, there was, there was plenty of people that fall into the category of post country kind of mentality. Like they've gotten so rich that countries don't really mean much. Governments don't mean much borders don't mean much. They, they saw themselves truly as citizens of the world.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, and when this was put up that there was the whole movement for like Esperanza and everything

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

and really the massive, massive globalist push of getting those ideas out there.

Sir Gene:

And I think that we were trying to move the us to metrics.

Sir Ben:

Yes. Well, there was also the idea of the north American union being floated and the AMERO all that.

Sir Gene:

Was it 79? I thought it was 83, but

Sir Ben:

I would, I mean, we can, you know, you can consult the

Sir Gene:

probably Google that. Yes, exactly.

Sir Ben:

you know, tragedy and hope was written in 66. And that really was the start of a lot of that movement.

Sir Gene:

That was that book Obama read

Sir Ben:

No tragedy and hope by Carol Quigley who was,

Sir Gene:

I'm I'm just kidding.

Sir Ben:

oh, okay.

Sir Gene:

No, what was the book? That, but there is a similar sounding book named that Obama wrote, right? Hope, hope of my father's or something.

Sir Ben:

I, I, I

Sir Gene:

Yeah. You haven't read Obama's

Sir Ben:

read one of, one of Paula's books. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

1980. Yeah, it was in 1980. Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Yeah. The the planning and the original commission of it, I think was started in 79 though, because the, the, the way the Georgia Guidestones came about for those who don't know was essentially someone gave a lawyer a bunch of money and told them to go buy this land and to erect this monument and. We have no idea who, the person who actually paid for it was

Sir Gene:

Interesting. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

done in secret on private land. Just all of a sudden, boom, Georgia Guidestones are there.

Sir Gene:

right. I mean, clearly what we now see is this is an arc piece, not anything that was truly meant to survive nuclear war

Sir Ben:

Well, I mean, it's out in the middle of nowhere. It's not like it's gonna be hit by, you know, a bomb and any stone monument or anything like that would likely survive given if it, you know, if it's not at ground zero,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

so meant to survive time weather and things like that, not necessarily a direct hit. So people making those jokes, it's kinda like, eh, you know, I don't know. You,

Sir Gene:

Should have been made out of carbon fiber

Sir Ben:

you mean graphing

Sir Gene:

yes. Ian made out of graphing.

Sir Ben:

yeah. I tried to watch Tim cast last night,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I watched, I watched a little bit of it. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Ugh. That was not

Sir Gene:

The graphing thing is really getting old.

Sir Ben:

yes, that,

Sir Gene:

The look on Ian's face is what makes this so funny because he's so fucking serious looking. If, if somebody doesn't know what we're talking about, Tim cast as a show done daily by Tim pool and has a regular on it named Ian can't remember his last name, but he is the sort of the token crazy guy. That will just say things that start off sounding like he's going somewhere, you know, relevant and quickly take a left turn and everyone's going, what, what the did he just say? I, I think, I think this is why Luke's on there only occasionally, because he cannot deal with being around Ian full time. Yes.

Sir Ben:

well, anyway, he had ho up Jesus on there last night and

Sir Gene:

I've watched that guy before

Sir Ben:

yeah, me too. And there there's lots of things that he covers that I find interesting. And it's him coming to, you know, he brought up what was the, oh my God, the agreement. I,

Sir Gene:

which one?

Sir Ben:

I was gonna go down this whole road and make a point. And now I'm just absolutely blanking the agreement in 1940 basically made the us the reserve co currency of the world.

Sir Gene:

oh, right, right, right. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

I'm trying to think of the name of it

Sir Gene:

The, we won the war bitch's agreement.

Sir Ben:

more or less

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Uh, I've lost that train of thought. So never mind.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Well, that was one of the things that my ex-wife bro mentioned, which she is keeping up, I guess, is the the bricks thing.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

And how, when in Western UC, well, Russia is being isolated by the rest of the world. It's like the rest of the world, dude bricks is literally over half the population of the planet. So what rests the world?

Sir Ben:

Yeah, I mean, bricks is also growing, which is interesting. And by the way, it was the Britain woods agreement. Good God, the Britain

Sir Gene:

I w I did not know that name, so I couldn't have helped you. Mm,

Sir Ben:

Really, definitely something to look at. The Britain woods agreement basically established the current monetary system globally and replaced gold as a median of exchange between nations with the us dollar. It's how it's the actual international agreement that created the us dollar as the reserve currency,

Sir Gene:

got it. So how

Sir Ben:

to Britain woods. It was, you know, if you were exchanging currencies between nations, it was literal gold movement that was happening.

Sir Gene:

Yep. Yep. Makes sense. Hmm. Well, and I can definitely exchange my rubles for gold.

Sir Ben:

I don't know if you're legally allowed to in the

Sir Gene:

No, I'm not, I'm not legally allowed to. I mean, I, theoretically I can exchange, I have no access to my rules right now.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, that which they're digital. So

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

that, that's one thing that I've never understood on currency trading and people who buy, you know, paper gold and things like that. Just kind of defeats the purpose to me.

Sir Gene:

yeah, there is something to be said for that. But to me, this is, this is just kinda like Bitcoin. It's a nice little better to have it than not have it kinda thing.

Sir Ben:

Oh yeah. Just not one of your major investments, you know, a minor

Sir Gene:

an investment. It's a retirement fund.

Sir Ben:

Uhhuh Uhhuh. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm But my retirement fund's doing than most people right now.

Sir Ben:

you gotta move for Russia to use it though.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm true story. Or at least go on vacation there.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

So I don't know when

Sir Ben:

Just not a, not, not a top 10 vacation spot for me.

Sir Gene:

Oh, it may turn out to be, you know, I mean maybe the place you can actually go that has food.

Sir Ben:

maybe, maybe man. Another thing, the, the, in the terms of the quickening, you know, one of the things that's really heated up is with the Dutch farmers, actual, you know, gunfire being shot at them for no justifiable reason.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, the guy was making a turn too close to a cop car.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

That's what it was. And it was also, I mean, it was kind of getting blown out a little bit. It was one cop that shot three rounds at one farmer.

Sir Ben:

Any cop shooting, any rounds at any farmer just sounds totalitarian to me, it doesn't really matter how much or anything else

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

that cop should be absolutely strung up to dry over that.

Sir Gene:

I agree. But remember, these are the people that gave up their bicycles to the Germans.

Sir Ben:

I, I understand it, it, it, I understand that, that the Dutch capitulated very quickly during world war II,

Sir Gene:

yeah. I mean, if, if somebody wants to to make the Dutch people throw out the current politicians, it's not that hard. The farmers just need to not collect their crops. Other people starve for a while. We'll see what happens.

Sir Ben:

well, the only problem there is that would be giving into what the government wants them to do.

Sir Gene:

Sometimes you have to demonstrate how bad decisions will impact somebody before people realize they're bad decisions.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And sometimes those people deflect and, you know, try and move away. And for those who don't know the Dutch

Sir Gene:

mean the Putin gas tax

Sir Ben:

yeah. The Dutch government is trying to limit the Nitrate emissions from farms and, you know, they, they are basically telling the farms and cattle farmers that fertilizer, bad cows, bad half of you have to shut down and they're not having that

Sir Gene:

it's not just cows either. It, it is literally the drainage from fertilizing other things it's not yeah. Other crops. Yeah, so I, I did a whole blur run yesterday on unrelenting on the Seppic too. It it's, it is stupid and it's not like they're living in the fricking desert there. They can build desalination plants and provide fresh cleaning water with no nitrates at all to the entire population, which is not that big.

Sir Ben:

Desalination has its own issues though, because what do you do with the brine?

Sir Gene:

You kill off the sea life. I mean, everybody knows that who cares?

Sir Ben:

that that's problematic.

Sir Gene:

Eh, you sell it as salt to you know, countries that need salt.

Sir Ben:

yeah. Yeah. I mean, we could just refill the great salt lake, right.

Sir Gene:

Well, we could refill the great salt lake for sure. Yeah. It's just gonna be, I mean, we created the the, what was that lake in California? It's all dead. No salt and sea. Yeah. I, I think, you know, yes, there are issues with desalination. I'm just throwing that. I was one of the examples, but I think reducing the amount of food production of a small country, like that is very dangerous. It's bad enough that they rely on somebody for their energy. You don't wanna rely on another country for your food.

Sir Ben:

well, it's, it's any reduction in food capacity right now, you know, the population has grown to the point that it has through modern farming. Otherwise we wouldn't have the

Sir Gene:

be 500,000. Everybody knows that or a million. I mean,

Sir Ben:

no, it was 500,000 or 500 million. Yeah, you're

Sir Gene:

It was a million. It was not 500,000.

Sir Ben:

million. That this is a reference back to the Georgia Guidestones by the way. And one of the principles written on it. But regardless, modern farming is the only reason that the global population is what it is because we can E out that many calories per acre. And you know, the us, we produce a lot of food. We are net exporter when it comes to our farming and food.

Sir Gene:

well, we were until this year. Yes.

Sir Ben:

Yes. This year is an exception, which is terrifying. But I think if all of all the countries, I don't think the us is gonna starve because we are capable of producing much more food generally than we can consume by our population.

Sir Gene:

Absolutely. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

there is that.

Sir Gene:

Although they are massively and have been for years trying to convert our food into petrol

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So yes, the the, the corn subsidies for ethanol and so on is, you know, why would you have your energy source competing with your food source? That makes no sense to me.

Sir Gene:

and it's not even all that efficient to source.

Sir Ben:

Well, and it's a, for people who haven't used it E 85 ethanol, the, the biggest problem with it is, you know, if your engine was not designed for it, the fuel lines, everything just gets eaten up. You know, alcohol basically attracts water. Yes. There's lots of problems there.

Sir Gene:

Yep. Yeah. And, and you, you can certainly build a motor that runs an ethanol, but but you're, you're gonna get a lot worse MPG running on pure ethanol.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And, you know, gasoline per pound per volume is just very efficient, fuel source.

Sir Gene:

I think diesel's a little more, so isn't that.

Sir Ben:

Well, it depends on what you're going for. Right? So the average car runs on gas for a reason. Diesel is actually up until they put in the new sulfur rules. Diesel was way easier to refine now with the sulfur rules. It's not but you know, depends

Sir Gene:

from a BTU standpoint, the amount of energy per kilogram

Sir Ben:

gasoline's more efficient.

Sir Gene:

it is, I thought diesel was,

Sir Ben:

I mean, diesel can, diesel motors generally produce more torque, but if you're looking at jewels of energy per kilogram, the more refined fuel's gonna be the better fuel.

Sir Gene:

Mm, okay. Well more refined. Doesn't really say what it's doing. I mean, it's you saying? Just from a less impurity standpoint, more refined or what

Sir Ben:

Well, well the actual hydrocarbon that you're combusting is more a fine, there's more of the, there's more hydrocarbon chains in gasoline than in diesel, just because of the refining process.

Sir Gene:

so, and though, each of those chains is what you're wanna break up.

Sir Ben:

It's what you're combusting.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. So, yeah. Okay. I just looked it up. You are correct. Yay. By 4%.

Sir Ben:

Yes.

Sir Gene:

All right. And then ethyl ether is even better

Sir Ben:

Yeah, but the,

Sir Gene:

methodol is even better than that.

Sir Ben:

it all comes down to stability though. Right. And various things. Gasoline is just a fairly stable compound. That's. The other problem with gas though, actually is it's much less stable than diesel. So if you have gas, that's a year old, two years old, you're probably not gonna be able to start an engine with it because it, it it's volatile. It does lose you know, off gas as

Sir Gene:

so like they've got natural gas has a range and the range is from about what diesel is all the way up to 55 mega Joles per kilogram from 42 to 55. So you could potentially have better energy density with natural gas, I guess. Hmm. Interesting. I never really looked this stuff up. But firewood is way the fuck. Less it's 16

Sir Ben:

yeah. Well, it it's. Yes.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Now, if you take that firewood and you put it in a gasification unit and you take the volatiles out of it and you use that, then, especially if you have an efficient gas of fire, essentially you're breaking any biomass down to two things hydrogen and co which both are extremely combustible. So when you combust hydrogen, you end up with water H two O and then you end up with when you combust carbon monoxide, you end up with CO2

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm that's cool. Uranium is 39,000 giga jewels.

Sir Ben:

and genes, just reading a table of energies densities at this point.

Sir Gene:

is cool, man. Well, I mean, okay, if I'm reading this table of energy densities, wouldn't it make sense? If I was in charge of the country to fuck all other fuels and focus on uranium and focus on the most energy dense energy that we have,

Sir Ben:

sure. But I mean, it, it all depends on how you extract that energy. So in light water

Sir Gene:

buy it from Russia.

Sir Ben:

it, when youre, when you're talking about a light water reactor or something like that, you know, you're, you're really not getting a lot of energy out of that.

Sir Gene:

again, 500 giga jewels for kilogram.

Sir Ben:

Well, it depends on how they're measuring it. So if you, you know, Einstein's equals MC square well equals MC square is for a atom that is at absolute zero, not in motion, no other energy in it. And then that being converted 100% to energy that energy conversion does not happen anywhere. Doesn't happen. Infusion doesn't happen, infusion, you know, theoretically a matter anti-matter reaction is as close as you can get to that sort of energy release,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

but we don't have that. So, you know, I, I'm not looking at the table. You are, but depending on how they're measuring it, you, you need to

Sir Gene:

natural is 3,900 sorry. Enriched uranium, but in light water reactor it's 500 that's way less.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, because that's the extraction rate, right? So when, when you've got a lightwater reactor and you've got the fuel rods in there, regardless of the type you know, you, you're just generating free neutrons that are bumping into other splitting atoms, releasing a fraction of the energy that's contained in the atom. you're taking a really heavy element and decaying it into lighter elements.

Sir Gene:

yeah, it's based on the 45,000 megawatt reactor, I guess,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I, I.

Sir Gene:

Burn of 3.5% in which uranium and light water.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, it, it would totally depend on, you know, the

Sir Gene:

Shut up, dude, I'm reading a table. anyway, point point being that that in all this stuff ethanol is way crappier than uranium. That was the point I was trying to make

Sir Ben:

well, I

Sir Gene:

as a fuel source.

Sir Ben:

could have told you that

Sir Gene:

Well, I did tell you that, but I'm, I'm just proving it with a table. That's all that, which you, nobody can see, except for me.

Sir Ben:

Yes.

Sir Gene:

Exactly. Well, you, you know, we could, we could do the show you know, with video feed, just strictly for the websites we're looking at too,

Sir Ben:

Yeah, we

Sir Gene:

a thing I've, I've tried doing that in the past. Have a companion companion video to the podcast. If you're curious, you can watch the video and see exactly the table that Jean is looking at

Sir Ben:

Well, what we could do is take screenshots of what we're looking at and then introduce it as chapters.

Sir Gene:

God damnit. You're just making me do work now. All right, I'll do that. This, this will have this will. I know I stopped doing chapters cuz it takes too long.

Sir Ben:

No, I, I wouldn't bother.

Sir Gene:

I just did. I took a screenshot so y'all will see the table in the chapter thing. It's there.

Sir Ben:

Well, then you gotta mark where you're gonna put the chapter and

Sir Gene:

That's not that hard. That part of it's actually not too bad. But it's, it's gathering the, the pictures that always took the longest for me,

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

because they're not ne they're a lot of times I'm watching a video. So then I have to pause clip, you know, and while you can easily clip a picture of a video on the phone, it's it's actually trickier on the computer cuz a lot of these video websites really go out of their ye to try and prevent you from doing that. So mm-hmm screen capture, video capture any, any of that stuff. And I was somebody had a, oh, I went to try and listen to a podcast. Somebody recommended on Apple's website cuz you know, normally you download it right from the RSS feed, but pretty much any podcast has a website. If you can find it that, that goes to the actual podcast and you can listen to it there. Well, these guys had it on, on the apple something and I go there, get this. I didn't realize this, but apple will not play a podcast episode for you unless you download a DRM extension for your browser. Yeah, that's what I said. What these are free. What, what, why do I need to install Apple's DRM

Sir Ben:

they

Sir Gene:

something apple doesn't own and is also free.

Sir Ben:

This has to be part of the move to have sponsored content or something like that. But even then

Sir Gene:

I know

Sir Ben:

can think of is if

Sir Gene:

has like a year ago or something. They introduced this ability for podcasts to come out with, you know, a paid podcast. That's only for your fans or whatever when they pay em money, but that's not what I was trying to listen to. Literally just went to, so I'm like screw that clicked on the Google link and then I could listen to it for free without Dr. DRM.

Sir Ben:

That it also could be, if they're doing dynamic ad insertion or something like that, doing some

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. It could be something like that, but it was labeled as DRM something, and maybe it's like already built in on the, the safari browser. So you wouldn't have to download dilly squad, but being in a PC, it gave me the, the, the extension download dialogue. It's like, oh, screw that.

Sir Ben:

as a browser.

Sir Gene:

Well, I mean, what do you use on your iPad?

Sir Ben:

I don't have an iPad.

Sir Gene:

There you go. That's why people would use safari cuz they have iPads.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Even then I, I, I just wouldn't

Sir Gene:

Well, I use, I use brave on the iPad or Hardy, Hardy, har whatever I like. I like brave on the iPads. It works pretty good.

Sir Ben:

yeah. My, my, my tablet is a surface go to running Lennox. So.

Sir Gene:

It's not even running. The Google thing.

Sir Ben:

Nope. It's running Linux. It's it's actually pretty nice. It's my main travel computer. Huh?

Sir Gene:

what, what do you do with it? You can't, I mean, it's Linux, there's no software. So

Sir Ben:

I can do everything I need to do when I'm traveling. I don't take my main laptop. I take that.

Sir Gene:

what do you just listen to podcasts and that's it then? Or

Sir Ben:

No. Any web browsing, anything I need to do? It's right there. I've got everything.

Sir Gene:

Webre don't sites, like check what OS you're running and don't display anything from UX. Cuz those people don't have any money to buy shit.

Sir Ben:

No,

Sir Gene:

Huh?

Sir Ben:

it, it works for me on

Sir Gene:

Okay. I don't know. I don't know, man. That's

Sir Ben:

Hell. I could even do the podcast from it if I need to

Sir Gene:

oh God, no. I well technically you could do the podcast from an iPad too, because the, the motu just works when you plug it into anything with USB

Sir Ben:

Yeah, well

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm I last, my last experience with Lennox was I wanna say red hat four.

Sir Ben:

Oh God, you need you. You've got to try a modern. Yeah, you really should. I mean, hell Jean load meant on something and it's meant as any windows user I can hand Lennox meant too. And they can use it. It's. It's stupid easy at this point. I'm not a big fan of the Dian releases. I being doing what I do. I'm far more in the CTO S red hat side of things, but, you know, at the same time there's been some really good work done over there, and Buntu has done a lot of stuff for just basic user usability. You know, obviously that's new Linux, but, you know, Hey, getting people started, isn't a bad thing.

Sir Gene:

Yep. Yeah. The, the big thing I remember from tu was just the repositories were very easy to access

Sir Ben:

Yeah. You know, for me, I, you know, yum is just what I am used to versus get. There's just some different things, but that's fine. You know, I, I, BSD is a thing for me too. I use BSD quite a bit on the back end on things, but,

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

you know, that's because I've been in that world for a long time. You know, I, I think everyone, a, anyone who really wants to know anything about computers or do anything you need to be using an operating system that makes it difficult for you because you'll actually learn what's going on. And, you know, I, I, I think about the kids today that are growing up with these phones and computers that just work, they have no idea how that works because they're not having to make it work. Whereas when I grew up, even in the. Early nineties and so on. It was not trivial to make things work.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, no, I, I agree with you. Although I think there are other things that are difficult to make work now, now that the phones and the computers are just sort of easy,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Like your audio routing issue.

Sir Gene:

like my right. Fuck you.

Sir Ben:

we were dicking around for like 20 minutes before the show cuz, and I've still got an echo in my ears, but you know yeah. We, we gave up no, I, I mean like I, I remember the first computer I built, I ended up with IQ conflicts and issues like that. And so I had to go in and change IQ settings and that took me down the road of, okay, what is this? Oh, it's an interrupt

Sir Gene:

why is it such a shitty design?

Sir Ben:

Well, I mean it

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

actually modern processors are that way for a reason. You know, it used to be that IO was pulled. So, you know, the PDPs of the world and things like that used to have poll IO. So what that means is, all right, I'm gonna read my IO. I'm gonna take that instruction from the input, what the user has done on the keyboard or whatever. I'm going to execute that I'm gonna write the output and then I'm gonna pull the input again.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Well, on a modern PC that wouldn't work, right? We have interrupt driven IO, which means the computer, anytime you interact with input is interrupting the process and the process is adapting to the new input. So when we were having interrupt request collisions back in the early nineties and so on it would be two devices trying to utilize the same interrupt request. And that obviously isn't gonna work now today. All of that is managed by modern bios, but the bios of today in the bios of 19 nine, I mean, bios on a server today is a full fledged Linux operating system.

Sir Gene:

yeah,

Sir Ben:

It's insane.

Sir Gene:

yeah, no dude, my my bios on my gaming PC is like fully graphic mouse driven.

Sir Ben:

Oh yeah. Yeah. But I'm, I'm, I'm, I'm talking down to diagnostics and installation stuff. I mean, modern server bios and out a management systems. It's, it's a full OS. And when you're thinking of it from a security standpoint, that that's problematic in, in and of itself. Yeah. Well, I mean it, the, a good analogy for your cell phone would be the baseman processor, right? The base band system, you can do whatever you want to secure the OS on top, but the base band handles everything underneath.

Sir Gene:

need to secure the OS if it's actually a nos mm-hmm mm-hmm Yeah. And that's, that's how people end up totally putting in different OS onto their Google phone.

Sir Ben:

Well, even if they do put, let's say, I, I mean, I've got a pixel five sitting right here. If I put graph OS on it, there's some things that can be done to limit access to base band. But the, the ultimate reality is if you have a nation state that wants access to that, or a carrier that wants direct access to that base band processor, then you're, there is no security layers that you can add onto that.

Sir Gene:

Right.

Sir Ben:

Now, if you get something, you know, what's the freedom phone, not the pine, but the the, the Liberty one that has the actual hardware switches and they've done the hardware, themselves. So they've secured the base man processor. If you believe what they've said, check, what is that phone called?

Sir Gene:

I know the one you're talking about. I think the dudes from that phone were on temple

Sir Ben:

No, no, I'm talking about a different one.

Sir Gene:

Oh, are you okay then? I don't know. Yeah, no, I got my I 13, third plus super duper ultra. That one works good.

Sir Ben:

yeah. yeah.

Sir Gene:

Hmm. Looking forward to the 14. That should be coming out. That'll probably be the last one. Before that we lose apple as a.

Sir Ben:

why do you think we're gonna lose apple as a company?

Sir Gene:

Cuz apple just published some information saying that they're in high risk because if China occupies Taiwan, apple loses its ability to make chips for all its devices.

Sir Ben:

Well, they should be building factories here.

Sir Gene:

You'd think so. Wouldn't you, but apple hates the America

Sir Ben:

They're an American company though.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm yeah. Most American companies hate America.

Sir Ben:

Well, that seems counterintuitive

Sir Gene:

yeah. Yeah, you would think so, but I think it comes from the fact that they're not really responsible to America. They're responsible to their stockholders and their stockholders don't have a problem with them hating America. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

most of the American companies are held majority wise from American stockholders. So, you know, if, if you live in America and you own any stocks in the stock market, those companies should have a fiduciary responsibility to you and the country.

Sir Gene:

a whole lot of people own individual stocks. It's mostly the, the retirement funds that own stocks.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, I guess man, I don't know. I, I invest differently than most people.

Sir Gene:

do. And I used to, I don't anymore, but I guess I sort of do cuz I bought rules, but it's if you just look at the stats, the. Individual investors are not even blips on the radar because the, the volumes that are getting moved by retirement

Sir Ben:

and everybody else.

Sir Gene:

are insanely big.

Sir Ben:

Yeah.

Sir Gene:

And a lot of those people don't just don't love America. They genuinely have a disdain for America,

Sir Ben:

Hmm.

Sir Gene:

too much. Freedom, too many guns, not enough abortions.

Sir Ben:

you saw Biden's executive order.

Sir Gene:

Yep. Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Did you see his prompter flub?

Sir Gene:

I didn't watch, I heard he had the pro for flaw, but I didn't watch it. What did he say? Do you remember?

Sir Ben:

Oh he, he was quoting a CEO and then he read the instructions in the quote, repeat the line.

Sir Gene:

that was an, so he was supposed to say something and then say it again with more

Sir Ben:

supposed to read the quote and then repeat the quote and instead he read, repeat line

Sir Gene:

oh my God.

Sir Ben:

yeah, you can't make that up. Anyway, the phone I was thinking of is the prism Libra five

Sir Gene:

Okay.

Sir Ben:

the Prism's been making hardware for security mind folks for a while, and they've got, you know, they've got some. Clout in the

Sir Gene:

It's called the prison. Labor five. Really? That's the phone

Sir Ben:

prism Libra five Librorum is in Liberty.

Sir Gene:

you sure it wasn't purism I,

Sir Ben:

Purism yeah.

Sir Gene:

I heard PR prison. Labor five is what you said.

Sir Ben:

Well then that was just a Freudian slip. I don't know what to tell you.

Sir Gene:

Huh? Okay. And this is some kind of Android thing or whatever.

Sir Ben:

no, it it's it's running their own OS. But it's a Linux based OS and you know, hardware switches associated with the camera. So you can literally hardware switch it off hardware, switch on the radio, things like that.

Sir Gene:

okay. Mm Hmm.

Sir Ben:

So physically able to kill the phone can physically pull the battery still on this phone,

Sir Gene:

No way it has a battery. Oh my

Sir Ben:

Yes. It has a user removable battery. Sure.

Sir Gene:

Like replaceable. So you can buy a battery instead of a thousand dollars phone. How much is this thing? Let me buy one

Sir Ben:

order now.

Sir Gene:

order now.

Sir Ben:

$1,200.

Sir Gene:

12, it is literally a cost of iPhone.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, but I mean,

Sir Gene:

Here's a problem. Seven 20 by 1440 display. Would he kidding me? I need at least at least a 4k display in there.

Sir Ben:

On a five inch screen. Why.

Sir Gene:

my God. That is pathetic. Well, that's what I have right now. Oh my God. Downgrade. No, this thing had comparable specs. I would totally three Meg of memory. That's all. It's got that cloud Scott. Wow.

Sir Ben:

Well, again,

Sir Gene:

Did I not have like the ultra version of this or something that I can, you know, well, I need to be able to surf the web and talk on the phone.

Sir Ben:

yes.

Sir Gene:

Well, I don't wanna compromise my experience.

Sir Ben:

okay. Well, anyway, I, I actually know a

Sir Gene:

you have one these,

Sir Ben:

No, I do not, but I've, I know a few people who have gotten previous versions and been pretty happy with it. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

hold on, hold on, hold on. Lead time for new orders. 52 weeks. So they take your money for a year before they give you a phone. Fuck that shit.

Sir Ben:

Well, they're doing batch processing, right? So they're getting orders together, then doing the order, shipping it out. I mean, this, this, this has been an iterative process with them for a while and it's supposedly getting better and

Sir Gene:

Is this supposed to be the fifth version of the phone that they're selling? So you could order this phone right now. And version six comes out six months from now and you still won't get your five for another six months after that. So

Sir Ben:

well, again, they're doing it in batches. So here's the design specs for this one. We're getting in these orders, we're running a manufacturing run while we're designing the new version. And then we're gonna do that and repeat, this is the model they've used for quite a while. They also have some decent laptop hardware. That's pretty security minded as well.

Sir Gene:

these, these are like laptops that only run legs. It's

Sir Ben:

Well it's no, you could run windows on it. But it's very much security focused design from the ground up

Sir Gene:

got a 1920 by 10 80 display. What's the deal with these guys using low res shit everywhere.

Sir Ben:

again. It's just the point is not to be your gaming PCG. The point is being able to have hardware that you can trust is the entire idea here.

Sir Gene:

kind of thickish too.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But,

Sir Gene:

does trust require a bigger thickness in the shittier display? I'm just saying there's no reason for this. There's no reason a company couldn't create a product that's competitive and add security.

Sir Ben:

you haven't looked at the custom laptop world very often. Have you cuz you're not gonna get, like I sitting in front of me is a Dell XPS 15. It's a nice thin, you know, beautiful computer.

Sir Gene:

Yep.

Sir Ben:

You're not gonna get that in the custom laptop space anyway. Yeah

Sir Gene:

do we need a custom on space? I thought we just need a little more security. I don't know, man. I, you know, back in the day we were working on tough books.

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

Those things were fucking brick.

Sir Ben:

Yep. They still exist.

Sir Gene:

and you drop 'em off the table and it bounces and it's perfectly okay.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And you know, what would be a good idea for everyone to do is go to eBay and get a, you know, reasonable, tough book, download Wikipedia and lots of other contents in it and throw it in a fair day cage and save it for the apocalypse lifts.

Sir Gene:

well, I've got a a Lenovo tablet that I use well, when the battery has anything, I don't, haven't actually used it for a while, but so I've got that. And then I've got a Lenovo laptop from years ago that I have just in case

Sir Ben:

yeah, I, I I, I used to love Lenovo, so I, I was on IBM think pads and, you know, Lenovo think pads for a long time. And then you know, the CCP ended up essentially acquiring Lenovo and I've moved away since,

Sir Gene:

yeah, but it doesn't, it doesn't make the old equipment any different. It's just the new shits made by CCP.

Sir Ben:

I don't know. Are you gonna do a driver update on it?

Sir Gene:

It's not been turned out in years.

Sir Ben:

Okay. I'm just saying, you know, it's same thing with Motorola. Motorola, you, I used to have Motorola phones all the time because they were awesome. And then, you know, Google bought spun off some stuff and then ended up selling it to Lenovo.

Sir Gene:

Hmm, you could buy a used Panasonic tough book and Amazon for 600 bucks right now.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

And these were like $7,000 devices back in the day.

Sir Ben:

Well, I mean, Dell makes hardened a, you know, hardened as in environmental conditioning computers as well. In, in some of the power plants I've been in that Dell has a hardened windows, tablet. That's actually pretty useful for a lot of guys to use. Yeah, so like having operator manuals, things like that in environments that are pretty rough, you know,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm Yep. No, that makes sense. So I don't even remember how we get on this topic, but let's move on. What else going on? Yeah, we could talk about, I got a couple things, but I've I'm more curious to see what what's making the rounds with you

Sir Ben:

I, I mean the Shinzo of thing the Georgia Guidestones was definitely up there. And then yeah, that was, I mean,

Sir Gene:

but all the gold being stolen out of Ukraine and moved to pond

Sir Ben:

yeah, up until yesterday. I hadn't heard of that. So tell me about it.

Sir Gene:

Well, all the gold and Ukraine ISS getting stolen, moved to PO.

Sir Ben:

Well, I, I think said differently the way the Ukrainians would phrase it is Poland is being gracious enough to hold onto our gold for now.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, hold our gold for a while. Will ya? So it is, it is I, this is, this is the kind of shit rose really makes me feel bad about for Ukrainians like actual people living in the Ukraine, not people working in the government of Ukraine that are the puppets of the us because they, this brings back a lot of memories, certainly for older people of the Nazis in their retreat, from their losses in Russia moving huge, huge amounts of Russian gold treasure back to Germany with them. Some of which it literally only got returned to Russia in the last 20 years because it was in private collections in German families. But the idea of moving a country's gold under the guise of for protection is completely transparent. I, I don't know who couldn't see through this. Thi this is literally the west getting ready to, for reality, to set in, which is that there's only two alternatives. One is Russia fully captures Ukraine. Installs a government or two, the people of Ukraine have a revolution to get rid of the current Monarch of Ukraine Zelensky and then get their freedom back because remember Zelensky government and really the couple of governments for the previous eight years are in occupation force. These are, these are people that came in really powered by the Nazis in Ukraine and took over the government.

Sir Ben:

Well

Sir Gene:

there were no free elections.

Sir Ben:

in the us, if you remember Victorian Kagan Noodleman

Sir Gene:

Yeah, yeah, yeah,

Sir Ben:

you know, fuck the EU.

Sir Gene:

Fuck. Are you? Yeah. No, it was, it was absolutely driven by the us. This was a successful state department operation. No two ways about it to the average Ukrainian farmer, whether it's somebody who's corrupt and friends with Russia or somebody who's corrupt and friends with the us does not make a whole lot of difference. Corruption has always been a way of life in Ukraine. That's just historical fact. That's not anything against Ukraine. They they've have a long history of being the place to go to, to do deals.

Sir Ben:

Now I am gonna challenge you on the whole gold thing, because what I would say is when you look at China during, you know, world war II, as the Japanese were invading and so on the Chinese aristocracy did the same thing. They fled with the nation's gold and lots of other things, you know, lots of different, anything they could carry and get out of China. They did. So, I actually had some family, friends that, you know that there was some involvement there, but anyway so I don't think that that's unique to the Ukraine. I, I can see powerful interests seeing, Hey, you know, Russia is going to take over either a large portion of the Ukraine or Ukraine is gonna have a collapse of some sort. Let me get out with as much treasure as

Sir Gene:

gold is never coming back.

Sir Ben:

absolutely.

Sir Gene:

That is a one way trip. That is the rape of Ukraine that is currently happening and it has nothing to do with Russia. It has to do with the west taking what it can out of that country

Sir Ben:

Well, I'm, I would say it's not necessarily even the U the west. It it's, Ukrainian's probably taking it and it's, Ukrainian's making the decision. So.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I, I don't think it's quite that simple. I think it, there, there are certainly people in Ukraine that, that made money. During the last eight years of being on the side of the west and pushing this conflict and causing the genocide in Eastern Ukraine. And those are the people that are currently gonna be stealing money outta Ukraine, and it will never come back to Ukraine. So that, that is definitely happening. Now they could be Ukrainian national nationals. I'm, I'll give you that. Sure. I'm not saying it's necessarily non Ukrainians doing it, but, but Ukraine as a country will have no gold reserves at the end of this. And I, it doesn't matter whether Russia fully occupies Ukraine or whether Russia stops exactly and where they are right now. And the, the next government of Ukraine will not be friendly to Zelensky. That's a fact that is that there's no way it could be any other way. The, the population of the country has been cut by 60% right now.

Sir Ben:

return either.

Sir Gene:

No, they're not. No. So Ukraine is gonna be both a shell, its former self in terms of population, but now will also have no ability to set up a banking system. It'll have to rely on forward banks. Because the country itself will not have any money, regardless of who's running it.

Sir Ben:

you're assuming that gold is required to have a banking system.

Sir Gene:

It is for a country. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Well,

Sir Gene:

You can't set up a banking system without gold. You can, you can shuffle things around later, but as a country, you have to have assets to set up the country's banking system. Otherwise you're relying on other nations doing it. And this, this has happened in, in places before, too. There's nothing unique about it. You can have only foreign banks, but that's not what most countries want.

Sir Ben:

I think it's what, again, you, you made a call fairly early on that. You know, that Ukraine was going to end up being split between Russia and Poland and that, that, that could happen. It's a possibility I don't know that it's a super high likelihood, but it's a possibility. I, I think that there is a buffer state that will exist in some form or fashion.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I mean, there, there would, there could very well, not be a fully Russian controlled Ukraine, but but man, who's gonna wanna live there because that, that state will. Will be the, the place that all the gorilla warfare is launched from. I mean, they're basically turning a European country like Ukraine into a Syria or Afghanistan.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, I mean, this, this is a proxy war. There's no doubt about it. You know, it, it, I, I don't know. It's gonna be interesting to see where this actually ends up landing because it, it could land that, you know? Okay. So Poland takes the you know, the Western half

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Russia takes the Eastern half. Then what,

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

you know, then Russia has a NATO country on his border that it didn't want.

Sir Gene:

Well it's, I don't think that that Ukraine will ever be a part of Russia. I think it's always going to be a, you know, autonomous zone, an autonomous Republic, whatever you wanna call it for that very reason to be a buffer state. Right. So you'd be much better off living in Russia than living in Ukraine, autonomous zone. So the idea of a Russian controlled Ukraine still leaves there, a Ukraine, it's just that it's gonna be friendly with Russia and unfriendly with the west.

Sir Ben:

you think that Don bus and so on, doesn't actually formally rejoin Russia. You think it stays its own autonomous thing.

Sir Gene:

It's I'd say it's probably about 60, 40. I think there is certainly a desire by some Russian people living there to become part of Russia. I don't, I don't think it's necessarily the best thing for the country of Russia. And so people may want that, but ultimately Russia it's, it's kinda like Texas joining the us. Right. There were people that won in it, but the us kept refusing for quite a few years cuz the movement to become part of the us started literally with the independence of Texas.

Sir Ben:

And it would've been far better off at Texas remained its own Republic. I, I fully agree with that.

Sir Gene:

Yep. So I, I think that there are gonna be people and there are people right now already trying to petition Russia to formally acknowledge that this whole region is now part of Russia. But from a Russian standpoint, I don't think that's really the best choice. And so it'd be better to have Ukraine as a friendly autonomous zone.

Sir Ben:

Okay. Well, we'll see what they decide to do.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

I know CSB is probably just pulling his hair out right now.

Sir Gene:

don't understand why that he listens. I seriously don't understand why he listens. The I think I would still am, am, am with my original sentiment from five months ago that I think Polands could end up taking Lavi because that, that was a Polish city historically. And it, it it's really, it got reassigned to Ukraine.

Sir Ben:

What context would they use to justify doing that?

Sir Gene:

They could do the exact same way. It's gonna be an autonomous zone controlled by Poland for the freedom of Ukraine. you know, I mean, it's like you, you gotta use politics speak here. It's, it's, it's gonna be phrased in a way that makes it seem like they're doing it for the benefit of Ukraine. Just like taking the gold for the benefit of Ukraine, but ultimately it's just gonna be part of Poland. And again, I don't really have a problem with that. I've never had a problem with that. I think it makes sense to me, the, the redrawing of maps during world war I and world war II has placed people that are of one ethnicity on the other side of the border, from where they used to be.

Sir Ben:

well, we'll, we'll see where it where it lands, man. Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

And, and the difference there too is like the, the Polish predominance Catholic, the Russians and the Ukrainians are Eastern Orthodox. Western Ukraine is mostly Catholic. So it's a religion, not just ethnicity. I mean, when you, when, when most of your relatives and your family are across the border, there's definitely a question as to why does the border exist on that side?

Sir Ben:

Well, yes and

Sir Gene:

not through immigration it's through redrawing of borders.

Sir Ben:

you know, well, and that, that happens anytime. There's a conflict, right? The, the borders do shift. It, it, but man, we have moved. So you think so in the us, I think this is a hard concept for a lot of people in the us, not necessarily Europeans, but to think of nationality as tied to ethnicity because in the us, it isn't right. I think that's a hard concept for a lot of people to really understand that, you know, a great example that we've used in the past on the show is Hitler, right? Hitler. Oh, Hitler was Austrian. No Hitler was German. He was ethnically tied and very much felt that he was German. That sort of thing, which is, which is interesting, especially in Europe, when you have those borders being redrawn, the way they have been over the last hundred, well, 150 years.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Because and, and while Austrians and Germans speak German Austria was part of the Austria-Hungarian empire. And and so there is a distinction in culture, I guess, the way I would phrase it from a standpoint of, of the us, I think, other than the civil war which, you know, we talk about way too much. We've been getting comments from people it's like, yeah, this is the civil war podcast,

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

That were in Northern aggression. I, I think people have a, a very particular perspective on what states are and that the country is the United States of America in Europe. And this was actually something I was, I was also talking to my ex-wife about, is like, you know, the world is isolating Russia, what you mean four countries, us, Canada, Britain, and EU. That's only four countries that I count that are isolating Russia. Who else.

Sir Ben:

the EU is a conglomeration of countries, but yes,

Sir Gene:

Well, they, they don't get to be both and that's the way they're acting. And it's like, when it's convenient, the U has like 30 countries in it when it's not convenient. The U EU is a country and it has states. So they're trying to have their cake and needed

Sir Ben:

with the capital S yes

Sir Gene:

it states exactly in the way that the United States has states with a capital S

Sir Ben:

no, no. So the United States is supposed to have states with the capital S in a much different way than we do, right. The 10th amendment states rights. Some of what the Supreme court has actually been doing here lately is returning decision power to the states. We are supposed to be in a far weaker federal system than we actually are in practicality. The E I, in fact, I would argue that we are supposed to be with more representation in the federal government, but far closer to what the EU is today. So, you know,

Sir Gene:

I'm saying is the UA, the UA, the UE is modeled effectively on the United States. Not, not the United States in its practical current form, but the United States in its design.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. With some major notable exceptions, you know, with lack of actual representation you know, the

Sir Gene:

Yeah. A bunch of unelected Kings running things. Correct. But still, I, I just like to poke that and it's like, no, it's four fucking countries, dude. That's not the rest of the world. It's four countries with not a particularly large population.

Sir Ben:

I mean, I, the population far exceeds the Russian population, so

Sir Gene:

Well, it does far exceed the Russian population. No, that's totally true. But that's hardly the rest of the world.

Sir Ben:

I, I would say in comparison via land AMA it's, it's a pretty good chunk of it.

Sir Gene:

It's about comparable to Russia.

Sir Ben:

The us and Canada plus Europe, I,

Sir Gene:

Oh, I meant I meant EU, but yeah,

Sir Ben:

okay. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

yeah, yeah, no, no, no Canada. And, and, but remember Canada is not as big as people think it is because most of Canada, if you look at it on a globe, instead of a flat map is much closer together up north than it is on represented on what's the projection called the square map projection. I can't remember,

Sir Ben:

I don't know. You're I don't, I don't know the term that you're asking

Sir Gene:

but you know what I mean? Like when you, when you stretch a globe out to a flat square surface, you, you exaggerate, you, you blow up everything in the south and the north. To make it look bigger in relation. Alaska is not nearly as big as it appears on square maps. That's why, if you wanna look at the projection from a globe from actual sphere, then you can see Alaska's true size, a lot better, but on a square map, Alaska looks almost as big as the entire lower 48,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Alaska's pretty damn big though. I mean, it's over double the size of Texas, so that's, that's pretty damn big.

Sir Gene:

but it looks like it's four times the size of Texas on the

Sir Ben:

I, yeah. Yeah. I gotcha. I gotcha. And it's just because you're taking a sphere and yep.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. There's a name for that. It's something projection, but whatever. So Europe is about 450 million. What's the us right now? Like 3

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Three 20 I

Sir Gene:

20. Okay. So that's like, 800 th million ish at Canada's negligible. That's probably like a million

Sir Ben:

think it's a little more than that.

Sir Gene:

I I'm just kidding. 38 million. It's not a whole lot more,

Sir Ben:

No, I mean, the population of

Sir Gene:

800 and 850. And then what's the UK. UK is 67. So eight 50. So about, so under a billion people that are in NATO or that NATO covers

Sir Ben:

Well, you're forgetting Turkey.

Sir Gene:

That's true. They're not in the UK, but they are in NATO.

Sir Ben:

They're not in the EU. Yes.

Sir Gene:

They are 83 million.

Sir Ben:

And there's

Sir Gene:

I mean, technically, I guess Norway and Finland would be added to that as well. Cuz they're not on the, either

Sir Ben:

Yep. There are 30 members. You also have to add

Sir Gene:

5 million from Finland.

Sir Ben:

Albania, you know,

Sir Gene:

Okay. Those, we just don't need to count. seriously. 5 million from Finland, 5 million from Norway. These are not countries. These are small S states. Yeah, so, population of earth, what is that right now? Seven and a half billion. So we have 1 billion out of seven and a half billion being represented by the countries that are referred to as the what do they refer to as the uncooperative countries or something, but basically the countries that have a, a boycot of Russian stuff,

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

although not really. I mean, they still want their energy. So my, my point with this is simply that there's an extremely. Distorted view that is being presented to the to the Western populations as to the impact and relevance of what the west is able to do to any country, not just Russia, but the same, same thing with China. If, if us and Europe decides to start putting sanctions on China, because China wants to unify with Taiwan, that's going to be even less effective and more negative effects for I mean, I just, I don't at, at some point, some party will emerge and it may very well be a communist party that will just simply say, no, we are not going to be involved in these wars. We're gonna focus on providing food for our own countries. And they will win then whether they win through elections or whether they win through revolution, that's, what's likely to happen because the, the course we're on right now is very much for Europe, hopefully even Canada, but certainly Europe and the us to get to a point where. People's basic human instincts will start guiding them rather than they're artificially created. You know, current political drives like L G B T fairness and shit like that. And black lives

Sir Ben:

I, I

Sir Gene:

that's not gonna matter.

Sir Ben:

I think the backlash against that has already started pretty hard

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Cuz the Georgia Guidestones just get destroyed.

Sir Ben:

Well, not, not just that, but just, you know, seeing what has happened with Disney recently on both the Baymax episode, and then what happened with light ear?

Sir Gene:

So I'm not aware of any of this shit, cuz I don't have kids

Sir Ben:

yeah. So in light year buzz light ear, so a, a new movie from the toy story franchise should have been a blockbuster hit basically was a dud in the box office. And.

Sir Gene:

made by the pedophile company.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, it was made by Disney, but the problem a lot of parents had was that there's a lesbian kiss in the movie. Some movie theaters even went to the point, trying to get traction on this of saying they would fast forward through the scene in the movie theater. So if that tells you anything on the backlash of the parents, there's that in an episode of Baymax, which is on Disney plus Baymax is in this tampon is trying to help a little girl with her first period. And he's asking people, you know, Hey, what should I get? And there's a what appears to be a, someone in a trans shirt that represents as male saying, oh, I use these that sort of thing. And there's some pretty major backlash on that.

Sir Gene:

Oh, and then the what's sort related to that. I dunno if you saw, I posted in no social, the Canadian military has changed their dress code to be more inclusive, allowing any of the clothing to be worn by anybody, meaning men can wear skirts. They've also removed restrictions on coloring nails, facial tattoos, and colored hair. And you know, I mean, all, all kidding aside as crazy as this is, I think the reason they're doing it because they did a, a study showing that their enlistment numbers will go to zero. If they don't do this because gen Z falls into that category to such a high degree that the there's nobody left. That to recruit that will follow the past dress standards.

Sir Ben:

maybe, but you know, military, military thrive on conformity. And without that, I don't know that you can have an effective

Sir Gene:

I go, well, beyond that, I said they require conformity

Sir Ben:

yeah, I would say so. I mean, units, cohesion, everything, it's you you're, you're just asking for a lot to fall apart there.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm yeah. It's not gonna, it's a joke. It they're they're already, I mean, Canadian military, I'm sure it has some

Sir Ben:

the Canadian military is a joke to begin with, right?

Sir Gene:

Exactly. Well, it's why I was going. I'm sure there's some individuals in the Canadian military that are fine, fine military people, but in general, it's it is a bit of a joke. This is gonna put it over the top. in terms of joke, militaries of the world.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, well, I'm sure there's some Canadian listening going, oh, you bastard. We have a fine proud military tradition.

Sir Gene:

exactly, you know, the first they would apologize for calling us masters of course, but yes,

Sir Ben:

yeah, yeah, yeah. It then that's one thing that I learned is, you know, Canadians they, they do not know how to form declarative sentences. A everything's a fucking question.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. They do have played hockey very well. You gotta give 'em that. I I'm

Sir Ben:

I,

Sir Gene:

totally on board with that statement.

Sir Ben:

yeah, the hockey's a, not a sport I watch, but sure.

Sir Gene:

Mm. I don't watch it a whole lot, but I used to play hockey. So for me, hockey's really the closest sport that I have any interest in. Tristan don't give a shit about football, baseball, any of the other ball games. But hockey's a little more interesting plus I grew up in the north, so, you know, I had, we had like snow season for nine months a year.

Sir Ben:

so just as a reference so light year opened at 51 million in north America, 85 million worldwide toy story for the last toy story. Opened at 120 million in the us 420 million worldwide and ended up crossing a billion dollars in revenue. massive difference.

Sir Gene:

yeah, well, that's good. That's good. It's a start, but I, I think things have to get a lot worse before they start getting.

Sir Ben:

Well, I, I, I think there is this, I think there's a pretty big backlash against ESG. You know, Musk has been pretty PO vocal about it. You know, I've held Disney stock for a very, very long time and it has been very profitable for me. It has gone through multiple splits and has done very well when the pandemic first hit and Disney stock tanked. I bought more and you know, it went back up this is not financial advice by any stretch, but, you know, I sold mine. And the reason why I sold mine is out of principle, not, you know, not financial reasons, but I've, I've sold off my Disney stock because I just, I don't like what the direction this company's going of. And I, I think that people have to start voting with their feet and their dollars and, you know, your 401k, you may have limited options on what you can invest in, but vet out what they're

Sir Gene:

your money out of your 401k and put it into a, a,

Sir Ben:

self-directed IRA.

Sir Gene:

Yep,

Sir Ben:

Yep. Which you're depending on the company and how long you're working for them, you may or may not be able to do that until you terminate that employee,

Sir Gene:

Yep.

Sir Ben:

employee, employer relationship, but yes. Yeah. So for instance, my my 401k from my last job, I did not roll it into my current 401k. I actually rolled it into a self-directed IRA.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm. yeah. That's I think a wise move on your part.

Sir Ben:

Well, I, I just want the investment options more than anything, you know,

Sir Gene:

Hey, you know, while we're talking here, I just look at some random facts and you know, the last time the population of the earth was 500 million. It

Sir Ben:

I, a very long time ago,

Sir Gene:

was around 1700.

Sir Ben:

really

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah.

Sir Ben:

I would've imagined a lot longer ago than that. Huh. Maybe,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm it was right around 1700, maybe 1690. So, that was a goofy number to begin with. I mean, why didn't they just do 1 billion

Sir Ben:

I don't know. Maybe may who knows, maybe there's some reference material there that shows how well we were, you know, living then.

Sir Gene:

that's when the surfs were the easiest to control.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. The, the, the, the, the, the number of surfs were manageable.

Sir Gene:

right, exactly. Cause you want a lot of service to do the work, but not so many. You can't control them.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. You don't want the the rebel rising.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

Which by the way, book recommendation

Sir Gene:

Gotta have that.

Sir Ben:

red rising this series I'm finished. I, I just finished the first trilogy and I'm onto the second one. I don't know how

Sir Gene:

the one you told me now, did you not give this recommendation already? Or did you just tell me privately that that's a book I need to read

Sir Ben:

well, I, so the, the first book was the one that I had read at that point. This I've read the entire trilogy and I can recommend the entire trilogy. The first trilogy at this point is what I'm saying.

Sir Gene:

I bought 'em all I bought. 'em all. They're I think number a hundred eighty two, a hundred eighty three and 184.

Sir Ben:

you gotta catch up, man.

Sir Gene:

look, I I think I'm gonna be wrapping up my job in about a month, which for other people is I'm not gonna be working and that'll gimme more free time to listen to audiobook and amongst other things to do like finding a job. But

Sir Ben:

moving the podcast to a, you know, some day during the

Sir Gene:

yeah, I, at, during the day that point, I just I'm, I'm literally like nonstop on conference calls all week long. So, so yeah, I mean, hopefully I'll find something quick, but I, I'm also hoping that I won't necessarily start it quick. So I'll have a little bit of time, maybe a couple of months in between that would be ideal. And that would give me plenty of time to catch up on a lot of things that I've been meaning to do that have just haven't had the energy do during the weekend after work hours. And I'm too busy playing video games on the weekends.

Sir Ben:

Well, you know, you could just not play the video games.

Sir Gene:

Well, you know, people could just not have kids.

Sir Ben:

well, there wouldn't be very many people left for a while. Would there be?

Sir Gene:

Maybe get to the appropriate number that way faster as well.

Sir Ben:

Yeah, well, you know, the amount of people who are having issues. Oh one thing I wanted to talk about, and I'm not gonna talk about who this was,

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

um, ran into a colleague that the last time I had saw them they were pretty ill from a bad, bad reaction to the vaccine.

Sir Gene:

vaccine.

Sir Ben:

And when I say a bad reaction to the point where an ovary had to be removed

Sir Gene:

Oh, that's definitely bad.

Sir Ben:

and inves absolutely tied directly to this and to the point where the doctor, you know, is going down this road. But yeah, they, I, I really think the Russian roulette theory of the vaccines is, is a real deal sort of thing. And I think that there are some people having massive reactions and, you know, people have, poo-pooed the idea of this affecting fertility? Well, I have someone I personally know that it directly did affect fertility. So yeah, I don't know. It's, it's a

Sir Gene:

I've always expected that to be the case. It, you know, it's, it's good seeing some evidence thereof, even though it's sad for the people that have experienced it, but there's a reason that I, I spent the last two years telling people not to take the vaccine. Because it is untested, not that there's anything wrong with the concept of vaccination,

Sir Ben:

No.

Sir Gene:

but there is something wrong with being a Guinea pig without signing up to be a Guinea pig and being compensated for it and having some sort of a safety net of what happens when you're a Guinea pig. And you have a bad reaction. Cause you have none of that right now.

Sir Ben:

so this person asked last year had asked me to do a guest lecture for one of her classes at a and M and you know, during the mask mandate, they were trying to get me there. And I, you know, I said, well, I'm no, I, sorry, I'm not gonna come on campus when there's this mandate. I'm just not gonna comply with that. And at one point they had called me up and said, Hey they're, you know, they've dropped the mask mandate for the vaccinated. And I go, well that, okay, that doesn't help me any. And anyway so it was very interesting to hear because, you know, they were kinda like, well, Ben, why is this such a big deal to you to now hear, you know, over a year later going, oh my God, I wish I had, I, I wish I had, you know, going down the, the rabbit hole that I was already down. So, so to speak.

Sir Gene:

you know, you know, what, what sort of unites people like us in terms of, of thought.

Sir Ben:

what's that,

Sir Gene:

Is the mistrust at a much higher level than the average American

Sir Ben:

Mistrust of what though?

Sir Gene:

mistrust of things that somebody tells you, who you don't see as qualified in that area. Like when you hear something on the news or you hear something from the government for the average American, they're like, oh, okay. Interesting for me, it's like, that sounds like bullshit to me.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But I don't think that inherently makes me mistrust full. I think it makes me a student of history and saying, you know, the, the vast majority

Sir Gene:

maybe mistrust, not the right word, but suspiciousness. I mean, it's, it's like, here's what comes down to and I, let me just speak for myself. Maybe not speak for you or other people. I know enough about a lot of topics to have a, a level of understanding where my questions can be. I can delve into questions to dig for the truth of a particular statement and to discover whether it's actual truth or whether this is like the sugar coated projected version of the truth they wanna portray.

Sir Ben:

well, you know, and what, what a lot of people have problems with is if you start Googling on the internet or going down rabbit holes, you know, there there's a, you can find a study that'll say just about anything. And in science today, there is a huge replication problem. Meaning studies come out say with XYZ findings and no one can replicate it. So, you know, for people who don't necessarily know statistics or can look at evidence and say, well, that's obviously bullshit a, a real easy way to determine a good researcher from a bad researcher is just look at the number of citations that they

Sir Gene:

Yep. Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

they are highly cited, they're probably a decent researcher. If they don't have a lot of citations or any citations, you can pretty safely ignore anything. They say.

Sir Gene:

yeah. And, and generally I would agree the there's a problem though, is that if we start looking at what used to be referred to as global warming now, as climate change science, the, the studies with the highest number of citations are also

Sir Ben:

It, it I'm, I'm just giving a general rule of thumb there. You know, Peterson got roasted on some of his statements around climate models, but he's statistically correct. And when I say statistically, I'm saying, when you make assumptions and you have a complex model in which you have to make a lot of assumptions, those errors compound out the further out you go. That's just the nature of the beast, because if I get one thing wrong here, it's, it's why you can do when you're talking about weather is a great example. When you're talking about predicting weather in the next hour, you can do a lot because you know, you, you have good data as you take that out further and further, you know, and this is why we joke about weathermen being paid to be wrong all the time, because those errors compound it's also why in physics, you can estimate a horse to be a sphere and project, lots of things about it. But again, those errors compound in the more complex of a system that you create over a longer period of time. So the fact that the matter is with any computer modeling or anything like that, you have garbage in garbage out, right? And the, the fact is. Trying to wrap your head around something as massive and as complex as the Earth's climate. I, I just don't think you can, that there is not enough data points and modeling capacity to do that today. There's just not,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

does not exist. You know, and they're solar energy, the, the waxing and waning of, of, of the Star's out son's output has a lot to do with the impact on climate. In fact, a couple weeks ago, when I was in Baltimore, I got asked, do I think climate change is real? And I said, well, it depends on what you mean. If you think anthropomorphic climate change, then no, I'm skeptical on that. If you think does the Earth's climate change over time? Absolutely. That's a normal natural phenomena, so

Sir Gene:

Yeah. Yeah, no, that's totally true. And, and the, the best example of anthrop more climate change, I would say is the micro climate around windmills. But the, the fact that the, the sun is 99% responsible for the, the temperature on the surface of the earth is undeniable. I mean, there there's, if every nuke that we have in stock exploded today, it would have a less than 1% change in the temperature on the planet compared to the sun.

Sir Ben:

the, if it was in space and not inside the atmosphere causing other issues. Yes.

Sir Gene:

I don't mean long term effect. I mean, like the actual output of energy,

Sir Ben:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely.

Sir Gene:

I'm being hyperbolic obviously, but the I'm trying to just make the point that the sun is the source of energy.

Sir Ben:

and what's genes saying there, because I misunderstood him at first, but correct. Three way communication here, gene. So what you're saying is the amount of energy that would be introduced and the rise in temperature because of that,

Sir Gene:

Directly resulting from that. Yes. Yep. Not, not the effect of the cloud cover being generated and then you know, having a

Sir Ben:

Nuclear, winter.

Sir Gene:

yeah, exactly. Or maybe even the clear winter as well. So I'm sorry, I can't help, but it's just so

Sir Ben:

it's okay. It's okay.

Sir Gene:

the, the other thing is in terms of temperature is, you know, when I was younger, it was global cooling in the freezing of the earth. That was the concern and the coming ice age, because from about 1940 to about 1978, the NASA observed temperatures were falling. So it it's a

Sir Ben:

yeah.

Sir Gene:

it's the, what we're studying is the wrong thing and where the concern is in the wrong place. In my opinion, what we need to do is redirect any bit of money that is currently spent on trying to prevent global climate change to spending that money on how does humanity take advantage of the changes that occur in the climate of the planet?

Sir Ben:

well, and, you know, in the 1970s and during that era that you're talking about, whereas global cooling, one of the things that was even discussed was putting carbon on the ice caps to sequester more of the sun's energy. So, you know, the, what I would say is engineering, our environment is beyond our capabilities at this point. So I, I think anytime you start screwing with weather manipulation that can have drastic unforeseen consequences, sort of like messing with, you know, DNA and the RNA vaccines. it's beyond our current level of understanding. And I think it takes a lot of hubris to assume that you can do something in that complex of a system. You know, that said, I, I would say that anthropomorphic climate change, you know, lake effect, weather is a perfect example where we build a lake and it does affect the local climate. Now, does that have a larger butterfly effect on the global climate? Probably not because it's such an insignificant local change.

Sir Gene:

Well, I think it probably does have an effect on global climate

Sir Ben:

right. But how measurable of a change?

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And, and is that effect completely canceled out by something else that happens 6,000 miles?

Sir Ben:

Right. If I put if I put a drop of cyanide it will, you know, it could kill you if I put that same drop of cyanide in a hunt.

Sir Gene:

that take Sinai on a regular basis to prevent that. But go

Sir Ben:

okay. But I Dr. Put that same dropper cyanide in a hundred gallons of water and you drink some not gonna hurt you. So it it's that delusion effect.

Sir Gene:

Exactly.

Sir Ben:

Sure. I mean, there are other poisons gene. I, I wouldn't be too worried about, you know?

Sir Gene:

Sinai.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But maybe that's just your KGB training. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

That's so easy to make. That's the thing I've heard. So from a from a focus standpoint it it's, I think this just shows the difference between people that are not referred to as conservatives actually being conservative in that they want to prevent all change and they want stasis. And then people on the other side, like me who want to be able to be flexible enough to adapt to changing conditions and are not concerned with maintaining stasis.

Sir Ben:

well, you know, it's, it, it's really an interesting paradigm because the true conservative is someone who has that high discussed reflex. The true liberal is someone with a low discussed reflex. But what we're seeing in our politics is what we call a conservative today.

Sir Gene:

Classical liberal

Sir Ben:

Yeah. It doesn't have the, I mean, there are people in the Republican party that are very traditionalists that have a high discuss reflex, but it's really an interesting separation that's occurring because you have the people who are, you know, on the liberal side today who have that, it's, it's really the extremes that have that high discuss reflex,

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm yeah. On the extremes.

Sir Ben:

demand conformity to whatever they see as their normal.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

Right. So I, if the term turf has come up, right. Trans and radical turfs trans exclusionary feminists, they're considered by the left as abhorrent because they don't accept the new normal

Sir Gene:

right? Correct. Yeah. No, that's, that's very true. And, and I think that right now, and I think I've even shared some videos with you. There are lesbians that are feeling. Like they're getting pushed out of LGBTQ plus plus whatever, because the idea that a, a man who becomes transsexual should be considered a woman by every right means that a lesbian should be expected to date people that were born as men and have penises

Sir Ben:

well

Sir Gene:

and engage in sexual activities because she's a lesbian she's into women. And that's a woman now. And th I mean, this was literally from an interview with us a lesbian and she was like, I don't wanna suck cock. I've never wanted to suck cock. I have no interest in doing it no matter what that person calls themselves.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. Well, you know, here, here's the thing. I, I don't care what you do with your own body as an adult. Once you reach the age of majority, you wanna do anything and we can have a debate on what that age should be. That's fine. The teachers having you know, literally closets of clothes in the classroom so that the kids can change when they get there. Not telling the parents, the, referring to a child by a different name, not telling the parents, you know, things like that. And this is more common than people think. And COVID has really part of, I think part of the globalist misstep was by taking the kids out of school and doing video classes and the parents who normally aren't that involved maybe have met the kids' teacher couple times, you know, go to the classroom if maybe once or twice a year started really seeing what their children were taught. And I think that's a big part of the backlash

Sir Gene:

And that, then that's a very good thing. And again, this is another example of maybe it had to get bad enough to start making people realize that change needs to happen because the, the idea that these children can be treated in a way that they should keep secret from their parents that's treat us. I mean, that, that, that is literally something, somebody would've in the olden days been strung up for

Sir Ben:

Well, the idea that a lot of these teachers and what I would say the current radical left have in common and what they think is that kids are not something that the parents have. They are beholden to the group.

Sir Gene:

Takes a village E

Sir Ben:

it I have, so it does, it takes more than just the parents to raise kids, but that does not mean that the, the village gets a say in how the parents raise the kids.

Sir Gene:

right, right. Well, that's why I'm quoting Hillary here,

Sir Ben:

Yes, I understand.

Sir Gene:

it's. Every total Italian totalitarian regime has separated children from parents. It was done in Germany. It was done in Russia. It was done in China. It was done in all regimes that needed to have a fast way to program the kids without the confusion of what their parents might be trying to tell them. So what's happening right now in the us. Isn't quite that extreme, but it is pretty damn obvious that the state

Sir Ben:

it's analogous.

Sir Gene:

it's analog. Yes, it's analogous. And it's that the state is encouraging the teaching of children to be contrary to what the parents may want.

Sir Ben:

Well, in, in, in, in Nazi Germany and in the USSR, it was literally the state forming, you know, in, in Germany, the Hitler youth. But in the us,

Sir Gene:

a member of the young communists,

Sir Ben:

yeah, in, in the us,

Sir Gene:

I was a leader in there.

Sir Ben:

my explains a lot.

Sir Gene:

Proud achievements of youth, you know?

Sir Ben:

Are, are you marking this down CSB? Uh

Sir Gene:

Yeah, yeah. Yes. He's beat ha. I knew it. He in Russian SP he's still in the Russian military.

Sir Ben:

yes. Anyway, so

Sir Gene:

Huh.

Sir Ben:

anyway,

Sir Gene:

That's literally how he talks.

Sir Ben:

So anyway, I think in the us it's more insidious because it's it, it's the Fabian socialist, it's the total compromise of the universities and the education system in the us that has come over the last several generations. And really the drastic change from when I was, you know, a child to now is night and day. The, the exposure that even my stepkids had to this is drastically different than what we're seeing in elementary schools today. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

it I've said pretty much since I was a kid myself that, oh my God, I can't imagine parents send their kids to school. I will never do that. I'm gonna homeschool and I just didn't have kids, but it's a it, it seems like one of those areas that if parents realized what school actually was, a lot more of them would want to homeschool.

Sir Ben:

And, you know, I think that it's not practical for everyone, unfortunately, because we do live in a country at this point where most households require two incomes.

Sir Gene:

You, feminism. No,

Sir Ben:

it's not just that it, it, I mean it, thank you inflation, you know, thank you, Jimmy Carter. Thank you. Lots of

Sir Gene:

no, no, no, no. All of that is the result of feminists pushing this idea that women should be able to work for their whole life. No, that's this all started. I thought we talked about this already, but this all started in the sixties and you can look at the average in income of American families and you can look at the buying power of that income. And between 1950 and 1990, we went from the, we kept the exact same buying power, but we went from a single provider to dual providers to achieve that same level.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. And part of that is because you have, what is essentially an artificial wage suppression, because you've nearly doubled the supply of

Sir Gene:

do, you, you literally doubled the supply of labor available.

Sir Ben:

I, I don't think it's a 100% one to one, but yes.

Sir Gene:

I think it's pretty damn close because there are more women than men and only a small percentage of women don't work.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So the analogous of this would be if you took the average starting wage of a job and then looked at today's minimum wage today's minimum wage versus the 1960s, average starting wage should be around $25 an hour

Sir Gene:

yeah.

Sir Ben:

Whereas in most states it's under 10,

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And it should be zero. The government has no business controlling wages.

Sir Ben:

100% agree. A minimum wage is a socialist construct that does nothing to help the economy. All it does is price people out of out of entry level jobs. And inflation

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm Yeah. But because this occurred over the course of about a 40 year period, so essentially like one and a half generations, maybe even two generations we didn't see a decrease in wages. What we saw was a slower rise in wages as the number of women came into the workforce with inflation outpacing. It that's exactly correct. So the seventies was definitely a, a much higher rate of inflation rise late seventies and early eighties. But overall, you can look at those graphs across like in 1950s, very few women worked and only, or virtually only women who were not married. So women may have finished high school and then get a, a job as a secretary up until the point that they would end up getting married. And then quit job and do their real job, which is having a family raising kids. Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

and it's interesting because another impact on the education system is that the, the very high achieving women in the 1950s and early sixties, typically they were teachers as a result of them, then moving to corporate America, the quality, average quality of teacher dropped.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

So. anyway you know, what I would say is what we should have done is we should have said, you know, what, if women want to enter the workforce, that's fine. I'm sure there are some men who would love to stay home and take care of the kids. Let's do that. Let's keep it a, you know, single provider, household old,

Sir Gene:

be the good thing for the kids while I do think there is probably some historical preferential for the female being the, the, the, you know,

Sir Ben:

certainly in infancy. So you know, women and men are typically temperamentally different. Now they're, this goes to the overlap of any group. There is enough overlap that when you're looking at the groups, it's not necessarily that statistically different, but when you're looking at the it tail ends, it is. So there are plenty of men who are temperamentally the same as females and plenty of females that are temperamentally the same as men. There's a lot of overlap, but when you're looking at the extremes, that's the differential.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, I, I think, and it has nothing to do with like, well, you just wanna prevent women from being able to no, no, no. This has to do with what, what we are biologically designed for. If you want to use that term or evolved into, if you want to use that term, the, the idea that man can do everything, a woman can is just a false statement. And likewise, a woman can do everything. A man can is a false statement.

Sir Ben:

Well, it depends on the man and it depends on the woman because there are plenty of equals.

Sir Gene:

a woman can birth a child. Yeah. Well

Sir Ben:

Yes. And that, so that's a biological difference, but I was speaking temperamentally

Sir Gene:

the temperamental is Desi. Well, again, they're using the word design here, but it could be whatever word you would prefer to use in whatever your per your religious beliefs are. But the temperament is there along with the physical differences, like they're not separate, they come hand in hand. If you are, if you are capable of birthing a child, You need a certain temperament that allows you to do that because all the women that didn't have the right temperament to birth, a child didn't have children and didn't pass on their genetics. So you end up with a, a very strong preference of the alignment of both the temperament, along with the biological differences, a man who couldn't go out

Sir Ben:

variation

Sir Gene:

there is random

Sir Ben:

temperament does skew towards the tail ends is what I'm saying.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. And those generally don't reproduce, they're generally biological mistakes.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

Tail ends that both sides.

Sir Ben:

Well, it depends on what your measurement is. So

Sir Gene:

well, the

Sir Ben:

the measurement of success, if you're looking at it purely biologically is the reproduction of your

Sir Gene:

Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. So I might be the smartest dude anywhere, but if I don't have kids, I'm not gonna pass on my genetic intelligence to anybody.

Sir Ben:

Well, but intelligence, the, your intelligence in your children's. And so I, people with high IQs don't necessarily have children with high IQs.

Sir Gene:

you're Jewish. Yes.

Sir Ben:

I, again, looking at the individual versus the group, yes. The higher IQ group will generally have higher IQ children. But at the individual level, that is less true. So, you know, one of the things I always preach is that the right level of analysis is always the individual. Cuz when you start looking at groups in it, it, it just gets too muddy, man.

Sir Gene:

Well, the problem with the individual is that there's too many of 'em.

Sir Ben:

It doesn't scale. Well that that's not

Sir Gene:

count well, you're, you're not really doing a study when every study has a sample of one.

Sir Ben:

Fair enough. Fair enough. But my point is there's a lot of overlap. That. So I, since you brought it up IQ research, you know, the tail ends. Yes. There's differentiation, but for the vast majority of people. So if we take you know, Jews and non-Jews, there's enough overlap there and you couldn't have chosen a worse example, well, you could have won, but Asians and non-Asians there's enough overlap that any one randomly chosen person is likely to have a similar IQ than the other. However, when you look at the tail ends of either direction of the bell curve, that becomes far and far, you know, less likely, but in, in that center, two quart tiles, the odds are pretty high. I'm just saying it's a, it's bunched up in the middle and then there's a parade of distribution off to the tail.

Sir Gene:

well, and then there, there's also the, what I thought was absolutely the brilliant opening of Idiocracy that has the intelligent couple keeping keeps talking about when the appropriate time to have kids is meanwhile, the, the the redneck idiot is now had like a half dozen and his kids are getting to the point where they're having kids. And,

Sir Ben:

yeah, yeah, yeah.

Sir Gene:

you know, so reproduction is not, not based on on intellectual success or fitness. It's really, it's also very much based on the the ability to find somebody to reproduce with

Sir Ben:

I mean, there is that, but there's also so modern society has actually kind of changed that because if you go back to just a few hundred years ago, the, the odds of you reproducing based off of your intelligence, you know, really did matter.

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

So I, I don't know. I,

Sir Gene:

No, I, that that is one of the other, that's the other hot rail topics that I've talked about in the past. We don't have time to get into today which is that modern medicine and other practices associated with life saving have completely fucked up our standards as far as genetics, being able to be utilized, to maximize the potential of healthy and prosperous individuals and, and minimize those that have you know, genetics that lead to problems, whether they're, those are psychological, whether those are physical, whatever else

Sir Ben:

So, what I'm hearing is Gene's a secret eugenicist

Sir Gene:

I am. I'm not a secret Egen. So I've said this plenty of times. I absolutely think eugenics is, is necessary for the survival of the species. So we, we cannot

Sir Ben:

a diverse gene pool is necessary for the survival of the species.

Sir Gene:

I think a diverse gene pool does nothing. If you allow every single gene in that pool to reproduce

Sir Ben:

Well, not every single one, but you know, and you, you allow natural selection to take its course. So I, I, you know, I'm not in

Sir Gene:

natural selection would be letting. Those you know, that require assistance for the entirety of their lives to survive. Allowing them to survive is

Sir Ben:

Yeah. But those people who require assistance for the entirety of their lives have a lower likelihood of reproducing.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. So you're in favor of sterilization then. Okay.

Sir Ben:

No, not at all.

Sir Gene:

Well, my point is that if, if we don't let nature take care of what it's been doing for literally millions of years, if not over a billion years we're going to end up in a we're, we're gonna be a species that can only survive the aid of our own constructions. Like we'll be effectively having to live in bubbles. I don't think we are. I think if you take a you know, a pack of, let's say a hundred kids and you drop 'em off in the jungle, that you'll end up with a couple of strong kids surviving.

Sir Ben:

I, I don't

Sir Gene:

Why?

Sir Ben:

at what age. Okay.

Sir Gene:

Mm it's gotta be an age where they're they have some sentience already.

Sir Ben:

So, and then what tools do they have? Because I, I think man man is incapable of surviving in the actual wild at this point in time without

Sir Gene:

I've watched plenty of episodes of survivor, man, man, you can build tools.

Sir Ben:

if you have the knowledge,

Sir Gene:

Sure. If you have the knowledge, but you certainly have the capability. So it's really the knowledge. That's the only piece. What I'm saying is we're gonna go from you need knowledge to survive to no, you can't breathe the atmosphere to survive because you're just a amorphous blob that can only live inside of a you know, a, a gas VA container, because that's, that's where we've let things go too.

Sir Ben:

huh? So what do we do with diabetics today?

Sir Gene:

Well, we shouldn't let 'em reproduce that's for

Sir Ben:

What if it's what if it's environmentally caused not genetically

Sir Gene:

Well then it's then there's no issue with reproduction. Yeah. And I, I mean like I'm totally open talking about this shit. So I've got diabetes, my genetics, which I've had tested have a lower a risk for diabetes by four X. So my diabetes is 100% environmentally cost. So there's no, no issue with passing on bad genes for diabetes, but it doesn't mean that you can't have the disease.

Sir Ben:

okay. So should we require genetic tests and everything

Sir Gene:

know, Gaga was a great blueprint for the future.

Sir Ben:

Uhhuh, yes. Yes. Ultimate totalitarian state.

Sir Gene:

at all. It's totally voluntary. What are you talking about? If people want to make sure that their kids are healthier than they themselves are, there is nothing that should be standing in their way.

Sir Ben:

I think playing around with genetics and eugenics is a very dangerous road to go down.

Sir Gene:

Oh, I don't disagree. That's dangerous. I'm just saying we're doing the opposite right now with it. Look, it's, it's very humanitarian to try and save everybody. I'm just saying that it's contrary to what has gotten us to where we are.

Sir Ben:

I, I think

Sir Gene:

We are the products of a hundred million years of eugenics.

Sir Ben:

Okay. I, I, I'm gonna go be John and live on the reservation. Thanks.

Sir Gene:

Well, the reservation only exists because of a hundred million years of eugenics.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. reference to brave new world by the way.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm I, I think that the, the,

Sir Ben:

Which brave new world is definitely the dystopian future we're living in.

Sir Gene:

it's yeah, well, I mean, it's a mix of all of 'em right there. There's plenty of 1984 that we're living in right now as well. That's very hard to argue, but yeah. Brave new world, 1984 then what's the other one? The It's usually the, the trilogy of the dystopian books that are all kinda,

Sir Ben:

Have you ever said, have you ever read the world set free,

Sir Gene:

No

Sir Ben:

predicted nuclear nuclear war and how the world would change afterwards and it it's really the idealized

Sir Gene:

well, so here's a, in the last five minutes that we have here. Cause I know there's a hard stop here for both of us, but so let's say that the, some,

Sir Ben:

no.

Sir Gene:

some war monering happens and we do get into a hot war with nuclear weapons being used on both sides. You think that that's it humanities over,

Sir Ben:

largely I think that you would,

Sir Gene:

not everybody is gonna get killed. Right? There'll be plenty of people that survive. But do you think that we're incapable of going back to a pre-industrial society right now?

Sir Ben:

I, I, I, I think that even with a limited engagement, if it, if you were to knock out the power grid in the us, more people would die as a consequence of living without modern. The modern world then would die from the actual conflict

Sir Gene:

mm-hmm so just if we just took out electricity. That would be sufficient enough, like for a prolonged period of time, let's say a year, a year without electricity. What percentage of the population in the us do you think would be dead high nineties. Okay. So we go from what? 350 million or whatever it is, or 400 million down to 40, 40,000

Sir Ben:

I mean, it would, it would very much depend on, I, I don't know. I mean, E even if you're a prepper, even if you've gone down that road and you think you're prepared, there's so many exigent exigent circumstances that would, you know, potentially get you you know, most of the diabetics, unless they have ways of producing insulin themselves are done for you have random accidents where you need life saving treatment and you can't get it. So you're

Sir Gene:

Yeah. It's all still a pretty small percentage. I mean, most people,

Sir Ben:

I know because most people, most people's immune systems are not healthy enough that they can fight off the common cold and, or bacterial infections on their own. I mean, the look at how often people run to antibiotics to fight off, you know,

Sir Gene:

well, that's just stupid.

Sir Ben:

but they do it.

Sir Gene:

I know, but that's just stupid.

Sir Ben:

Okay.

Sir Gene:

Maybe those people shouldn't survive.

Sir Ben:

food refrigeration's gone. So, you know, PE people don't know how to hunt.

Sir Gene:

So people

Sir Ben:

butcher animals. People don't know how to preserve meat.

Sir Gene:

But, okay. But those are, so some of those can be taught. Like you can teach somebody to hunt, you can teach somebody to Butch. So if there's one guy in a group that knows how to do that, you can teach people that.

Sir Ben:

okay. Modern houses, aren't equipped with a fireplace. So what are you gonna do during winter?

Sir Gene:

Exactly. So stuff like that is gonna be a bigger problem. Cuz you can't light a fire in the middle of your house, unless you knock out your roof, which kind of defeats the point of having the house.

Sir Ben:

Yes.

Sir Gene:

Yeah.

Sir Ben:

So anyway, I, I think it's it, it would be very difficult for the vast majority of people to survive. A good book on that is Lucifer's hammer Jerry porn and Larry Nevin. Anytime they kind of teamed up, they did amazing stuff and Lucifer's hammer isn't, you know, a war scenario, but it is a, a catastrophe and you know, how some people survive and some people don't and the devolution of man into cannibalism and everything else, and, you know, modern society. And the tranquility that we live in is really predicated by three days worth of food and water.

Sir Gene:

yeah, I think certainly. Yeah, three days of foods. I mean, people can go without food for three days is not a big deal, but water is definitely an issue when, when the, if the water pumps stop and the water towers are no longer refilled and you turn on your faucet and nothing comes out of there, there's gonna be mass panic.

Sir Ben:

Mm-hmm

Sir Gene:

And we are, I think, pretty damn close to that in a lot of places in Europe, because those water pumps are driven by gas.

Sir Ben:

Well, and you well and electricity, but yeah, when, when you look at Texas, like we said, it's gonna be a hundred, 406 ish between somewhere in between. There, here today. A lot of, without electricity, a lot of people die from heat exhaustion.

Sir Gene:

Mm-hmm

Sir Ben:

A lot of people are borderline dehydrated, pretty much chronically. And you know, it doesn't take a lot to, for that person to end up with heatstroke. We are, we have weakened ourselves tremendously and voluntarily.

Sir Gene:

for the sake of convenience.

Sir Ben:

Well, and I mean, I don't know about you, but I am very thankful for air conditioning.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, no

Sir Ben:

it.

Sir Gene:

dude, it got to 83 and there was yesterday and I was not a happy camper.

Sir Ben:

They turned up your thermostat again.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. I don't know how, I mean, I thought I'd dis all that.

Sir Ben:

Just disconnect it from the wifi.

Sir Gene:

I guess I could, but I kinda like being able to control it myself from the wifi.

Sir Ben:

I'm gonna go take a picture of my thermostat for you again.

Sir Gene:

mean, I could also just like, I could probably just, you know, get a different thermostat. Yeah. I don't, I don't have to,

Sir Ben:

Yeah. I mean, did you sign up for a program

Sir Gene:

Yeah, yeah. I signed up for it.

Sir Ben:

Well then there you go.

Sir Gene:

I know, but I also unsigned up for it.

Sir Ben:

Well, apparently they don't think so.

Sir Gene:

Apparently once you sign up, you're on it permanently, that's it you're screwed you. We get to control your, your temperature in your house who thinks that 83 is a reasonable temperature for inside the house in the government.

Sir Ben:

Well, they may be assuming that you're not there during the day that you're actually going to work and doing something.

Sir Gene:

Yeah, but this is in the evening, like at 7:00 PM,

Sir Ben:

Wow.

Sir Gene:

who's gonna be eating dinner at 83 degree. Temperatures. Look, I I'm actually not that far from it normally because I, I have pet reptiles that like warmth. And so I kinda keep it at 78. So 78 to 83 is only five degrees difference, but it's not comfortable at 85 unless you're outside by the pool, having a drink and sitting in sunshine.

Sir Ben:

do it so he do an experiment. They may, why don't you lower the temperature from 78 to, you know, 73 and see if they

Sir Gene:

Oh,

Sir Ben:

raise it, but they may just be raising it five degrees.

Sir Gene:

You're right. Oh my God. I haven't thought of that. I think you're onto something. So may, maybe all they're doing is saying bump it by five and I'm bitching about what kind of idiot puts it at E three, but I'm the idiot that puts that on 78. Okay. I'll put it on 75 and see if it goes to ed

Sir Ben:

exactly. Yeah.

Sir Gene:

that that's actually very that's a very good point. Cause I never thought of that.

Sir Ben:

I, I would bet that's probably what they're doing.

Sir Gene:

Yeah. That would actually make more sense. Wouldn't it? It's just like, well, we'll just make people slightly uncomfortable cuz they're probably keeping it somewhere between 74 and 76.

Sir Ben:

Yeah. So we'll make a five degree adjustment to what they're used to.

Sir Gene:

So like it'll be 78 or 79.

Sir Ben:

Yep.

Sir Gene:

Yep. You're probably right. Uhhuh and I'm like, why would somebody put everybody's houses at 83? That makes no sense. And it doesn't make any

Sir Ben:

Yep.

Sir Gene:

Well, and that, on that note let's wrap up, dude. I think we're in the, at a good stopping point here.

Sir Ben:

yeah. All right, Jean, we'll talk to you on the other side

Sir Gene:

Good, good chat as usual. Have yourself a wonderful time. In Floreta and yeah, let me know how things are and then we'll be back.

Sir Ben:

Later.